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Old 05-04-2012, 08:04 AM   #1
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Real Anchor loads

This months Practical Sailor ran a test in a spot with winds of up to 30K,but in protected waters,so there was no surge load.

At 3-1 (40ft sailboat)the max load veering was 1200-1400lbs.

At 7-1 down to 900lbs. 10-1 was best.

So the anchor has to handle fairly light loads.Even on power boats with higher windage.

The chain tests became bar tight as the boat slewed side to side.

With such light loading perhaps many folks are using line that is too thick to stretch,increasing the shock loads the boat must suffer?

The second problem they pointed out was Burying anchors really DO dig in.

In heavy weather, a trip line on a buoy would reduce the recovery loads on the shank.

WE use a buoy every time as it makes the anchoring picture easier for the next arrival.



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Old 05-04-2012, 10:25 AM   #2
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The trouble with an anchor bouy/tripline is it can get tangled in running gear on a tide change (and cause 'unanchoring').
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Old 05-04-2012, 10:50 AM   #3
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But I can see some real advantages to using a trip line. For one it tells you exactly where the anchor is rather than having a spotter on the deck point to where the rode enters the water. I can't see the rode in the water from the helm so the admiral has to scout for me. Another reason of course is to dis-lodge it if necessary. However I've never had a problem freeing an anchor, maybe I've just been lucky.

One problem though is retrieving the trip line and having to untie it from the anchor, especially on a bouncing deck.

I haven't used one but will consider it.
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Old 05-04-2012, 10:52 AM   #4
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FF,
"power boats with higher windage." An overstuffed sundeck w a big tent on top ....yes ...but I would think most trawlers like an IG would'nt have as much as a sailboat w masts and all that rigg'in. And boats like ours w/o a FB would have much less.

When you say "bouy" you mean trip line? I may start anchoring from the stern w a bridle and I think the trip line w an orange bouy may help tell the next guy into the anchorage that I'm stern anchored.

I agree about the stretch but I think you over stress that one. If stretch were a big deal all chain rodes would out.

FF writes "Burying anchors really DO dig in.". Depends on the bottom much more than the anchor but you use the expression "burying anchors"..... other than a Navy anchor what anchors are non burying?

Fred I'm impressed that you use a trip line all the time. With our deep and small anchorages w 23' tides our trip lines need to be quite long ...100' at times. I need to carry two trip lines. And in shallow water at low tides our trip line bouy may not be anywhere the anchor. And if I guess wrong about the length the bouy could be try'in to pull the anchor out.
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Old 05-04-2012, 12:45 PM   #5
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The trouble with an anchor bouy/tripline is it can get tangled in running gear on a tide change (and cause 'unanchoring').

We use a trip line about half the time we anchor and have never had it come anywhere close to the running gear even when the wind or current moves js fairly close to the float. And certainly not when we're retrieving the anchor. We use sinking line and take up all the slack when the line and float are deployed. So the float sits directly or almost directly over the anchor the whole time depending on the state of the tide.
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Old 05-04-2012, 12:48 PM   #6
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Our trip line is simply tied (bowline) to a shakel on the anchor .

The line passes thru an orange buoy ring and a small lead for sampling the bottom is at the bitter end.

This allows the ball to float directly over the anchor,a boat hook grabs the line if required..

With the anchor on deck,the lead line is always handy.

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Old 05-04-2012, 01:28 PM   #7
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Seems to me that when the tide comes in you guys won't be able to see your trip line float. just say'in

Unless you anchor at high tide ....and then at low tide the float/buoy would not be directly over the anchor.

But have no fear.....one would only need to wait for half a day for the tide to go out to retrieve the anchor.
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Old 05-04-2012, 02:04 PM   #8
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No,we set the length of the trip line to allow for the tide range.
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Old 05-04-2012, 05:58 PM   #9
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We have an "eye" at the bottom of the float. The bitter end of the line from the anchor is inserted through the "eye" and a one-pound weight is clipped to the line. As the tide rises and falls the weight will "adjust" leaving the float directly over the anchor. Regardless of tide height. That way we don't have a wandering float at low tide or a sunk float at high tide. And since the line is always held down by the weight, we don't have to worry about line floating around on the surface and getting snagged in a prop or steering gear. Now if I could only convince other boaters that our trip float isn't a "mooring bouy" for them to tie on...!
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Old 05-04-2012, 06:12 PM   #10
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We have an "eye" at the bottom of the float. The bitter end of the line from the anchor is inserted through the "eye" and a one-pound weight is clipped to the line. As the tide rises and falls the weight will "adjust" leaving the float directly over the anchor. Regardless of tide height. That way we don't have a wandering float at low tide or a sunk float at high tide. And since the line is always held down by the weight, we don't have to worry about line floating around on the surface and getting snagged in a prop or steering gear.
Very clever, Ray. You've got to show me the next time we're at the marina at the same time.
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Old 05-04-2012, 08:50 PM   #11
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That's serious anchoring gear Ray. I'd a never thunk. Is it a bit hard to handle? Just a regular trip line and float is right on the line of being too much trouble. But when I get my anchor stuck I'd be quite proud of myself. Ever happened to you?

Hey Marin......This guy's a mile ahead of us and we do'nt hear from him terribly often. Wonder what else he's got to share.
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Old 05-04-2012, 09:02 PM   #12
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The "counterweight" system Ray describes can be quite effective. We don't use that, however. We simply javelin the float and trip line way out to the side of the boat just before deploying the anchor. Since we have to take the dog ashore once we get the anchor set we just dingy over to the trip line float, coil up the excess line leaving enough slack to compensate for the tide, and clip the coil to the underside of the float.
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Old 05-04-2012, 10:25 PM   #13
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That's serious anchoring gear Ray. I'd a never thunk. Is it a bit hard to handle?
I use it without too much thought now, Eric. By the way, the weight I use is too large to fit through the "eye" of the float.

Ironically, I've never had to use the trip line to break the anchor out. That's why I always use it.. Murphy's Law, ya' know!
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Old 05-05-2012, 05:58 AM   #14
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I always use a trip line and in addition I place a float on the line so that the nylon rode floats up so when the boat moving around the coral is not snagged. The float I am using lifts a few feet of chain and the nylon in calm conditions. In a blow it just sinks. I have to admit I rarely anchor near others, so this may not work in a crowd. I have always wanted to cover my rode lead with a single brad poly (like a cover) and see if I could get it to float.
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Old 05-05-2012, 06:30 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by manyboats
That's serious anchoring gear Ray. I'd a never thunk. Is it a bit hard to handle?

Marin wrote...
The "counterweight" system Ray describes can be quite effective. We don't use that, however. We simply javelin the float and trip line way out to the side of the boat just before deploying the anchor. Since we have to take the dog ashore once we get the anchor set we just dingy over to the trip line float, coil up the excess line leaving enough slack to compensate for the tide, and clip the coil to the underside of the float.

Giggitoni wrote...
I use it without too much thought now, Eric. By the way, the weight I use is too large to fit through the "eye" of the float.
Ironically, I've never had to use the trip line to break the anchor out. That's why I always use it.. Murphy's Law, ya' know!
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Or...guys...you could save all that kerfuffle by just having an anchor with a special trip slot one can use when in the situation where one rarely does foul something in or on the bottom...have you heard of it...I'm sure you have...? It makes all that stuff above totally irrelevant and unnecessary. 'Course if you find all that frigging about fun...well that's another matter...
....He he he
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Old 05-05-2012, 06:45 AM   #16
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Fouled in Cape May ,right behind the Hooligan navy (USCG) on a huge 1 1/4 steel cable.

Didnt bother the hud windlass,but new 5/8 nylon began to pull apart.
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Old 05-05-2012, 06:53 AM   #17
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Fouled in Cape May ,right behind the Hooligan navy (USCG) on a huge 1 1/4 steel cable.

Didnt bother the hud windlass,but new 5/8 nylon began to pull apart.
Interesting...only time I've fouled an anchor bad was out in front (oceanside) of the Cape May Coast Guard Training Ctr on an old cable around 1.5 inches in diameter. Had 2 guys pulling by hand and they almost had the bow of my 23 foot sailboat underwater!

Wonder if all the old cable laying on the bottom is from the days when it was a Navy Air Station.
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Old 05-05-2012, 02:22 PM   #18
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[/I] Or...guys...you could save all that kerfuffle by just having an anchor with a special trip slot one can use when in the situation where one rarely does foul something in or on the bottom...
A trip line only trips the anchor when you pull on it. Attaching the rode to a shank slot can trip the anchor when the boat pulls on it. Like at 3am when the wind shifts. I prefer to retain control of when our anchor backs out of the bottom.
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Old 05-05-2012, 02:26 PM   #19
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Wonder if all the old cable laying on the bottom is from the days when it was a Navy Air Station.
That's the issue here. Lots of the bays had logging operations on them at one time. Old lengths of cable, pipe, you name it ended up on the bottom along with waterlogged logs. All sorts of anchor-snagging stuff.
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Old 05-06-2012, 06:10 AM   #20
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Insurance is usually to protect the "other" guy.

Using a trip line is insurance for the boat.

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