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Old 02-06-2014, 05:51 AM   #21
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Yeah. I've got drag queen.

But it still isn't the same as eyeballing a tree out of a port at 3:00 am in the morning.
You're right... it's a lot less scarier than waking up at 3am when the tide changed and the tree's on the other side of the boat!

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Old 02-06-2014, 06:02 AM   #22
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I use Drag Queen, my plotter and before anchoring if I am near land take a few bearings off my radar.
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Benn, what distance do you set for the alarm to go off. I was fiddling with the anchor alarm setting on my GPS at New Year, as I had not used it before, (we have never dragged since we got the Sarca), but I thought I should at least know what to do. It defaulted to 0.15 nm - I felt that was too far by far. I knocked it back to 0.01nm I think. What distance do you set, assuming normal anchorage conditions. Ie reasonable swing room, no major obstructions etc..?
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Old 02-06-2014, 06:54 AM   #23
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Thread creep! ;-)

Would a golf range finder work? Yea, I guess it might, but you would need a laser one. It's not a bad idea.

As for an alarm, I opted for a stand-alone model. ( http://boathooked.com/articles/anchoralarm.html )This, to me, is a great idea. There's no searching thru menus to find the anchor alarm in a chartplotter (and mine is on the flybridge), uses almost no battery power, portable, the cell apps require GPS enabled that will kill your battery (there are easy ways around that I suppose)... I just like the idea of a dedicated box as an alarm. For some reason, I used to always forget to set the alarm at the DROP point, so it was basically a crap shoot.

Still, dragging in the Neuse in any normal weather, is rare. So I am NOT the anchoring expert. That gloppy bottom, once you're set, sticks like glue ;-)
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Old 02-06-2014, 08:32 AM   #24
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Benn, what distance do you set for the alarm to go off.
Since I usually forget to set my anchor location until after I set the anchor, I double the length of my anchor chain and add 50 feet. Not real scientific but works for me. Dave
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Old 02-06-2014, 08:43 AM   #25
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Benn, what distance do you set for the alarm to go off. ..................... It defaulted to 0.15 nm - I felt that was too far by far. I knocked it back to 0.01nm I think. What distance do you set, assuming normal anchorage conditions. Ie reasonable swing room, no major obstructions etc..?
Since you probably measure your rode in feet, nautical miles on an anchor drag alarm would be pretty confusing.

Without doing a lot of calculations, 100' of rode would allow a swing of about 200'. So, with 100' of rode, I set the alarm to 250 feet or so. If it wakes me up during the night and I determine we're not dragging, I just add a few more feet and go back to bed.
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Old 02-12-2014, 03:18 PM   #26
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Never used a laser range finder before, but if in the middle of the night the current swapped 180* wouldnt it take a while to determine if you were holding or not? With a chartplotter and a waypoint where the anchor was dropped, you can determine if you are still in the swing radius of the WPT in a couple seconds. You're either in the circle or you are not.
I think the RF would be good for checking distance to other boats. Especially ones drifting down on you.
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Old 02-13-2014, 05:36 AM   #27
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>but if in the middle of the night the current swapped 180* wouldnt it take a while to determine if you were holding or not?<

NOPE , a glance at how the stern set anchor was holding would do.

WE use a Bahama more set almost 100% of the time as it takes less time to set than program some electric gadget.

The gadget will tell me after we are drifting out of the bay , the stern anchor PREVENTS the problem.
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Old 02-13-2014, 07:37 AM   #28
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In my experience the "gadget" takes only seconds to set and it wakes me if the boat leaves the circle I've set.

A stern anchor in an area with reversing tidal current will put the current against the stern at some point. I've been taught that the pointy end of the boat should face the current for the least resistance.

A stern anchor would take more time and effort to set and there's no windlass at the stern.
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Old 02-13-2014, 07:45 AM   #29
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I set the tracking on the Nobeltec. Gives a visual representation if we are doing tide swing (normal) or something more(dragging). A longish tail outside of swing circle will alert watchstander.
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Old 02-13-2014, 10:06 AM   #30
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I've used radar a few times to get accurate distance info for other boats. It works pretty well but seems to be a big effort. Also, turning on your radar when another boat is coming into an anchorage (when you have an open array) seems a little unfriendly to me.

I'd love to know which laser rangefinders are being used and which ones work well - 1,000 feet would be a good maximum distance if that's even possible with the technology.
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Old 02-13-2014, 02:58 PM   #31
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The thing I don't like about anchoring from both ends is that when the wind comes from the side the load on the anchors can be very high.

Pointy end fwd? Could be a big advantage to have the bow downwind if you don't like sailing back and forth. And the stern cleats would set up an excellent bridle arrangement.

But drag form a changing tide? Fly stuff I'd say or hardly any difference w a FD hull. I think I could reach my cruising speed going backwards w a RH prop. Don't think I'd be strong enough to control the rudder though.
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Old 02-13-2014, 04:18 PM   #32
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I seem to be the minority here but I use my chart plotter and depth finder.


The size of the alarm circle is dependant on the anchorage depth, but with a little practice you get a system down. No trig for me, I go by gut feeling and experience.

Since I cannot hear the chart plotter buzzer from my stateroom I installed a extremely effective alarm in my staterooom. Very loud, very unplesant.
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Old 02-13-2014, 05:43 PM   #33
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I seem to be the minority here but I use my chart plotter and depth finder.


The size of the alarm circle is dependant on the anchorage depth, but with a little practice you get a system down. No trig for me, I go by gut feeling and experience.

Since I cannot hear the chart plotter buzzer from my stateroom I installed a extremely effective alarm in my staterooom. Very loud, very unplesant.
Most, possibly all chart plotters have a provision for an external alarm. I connected one to mine as well.
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Old 02-13-2014, 09:41 PM   #34
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Most, possibly all chart plotters have a provision for an external alarm. I connected one to mine as well.
Yep, first time it went off in the middle of the night right above my bunk I thought all hell was breaking loose. No sleeping through that bugger!
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Old 02-13-2014, 09:56 PM   #35
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Just re-read this thread and realized that I am in the minority here. Most of my anchoring includes a stern tie to shore. Most of the times I'm tucked in a nice little cove, and any swing would mean probably ending up on a rock as the tide goes out. So triangulating off of a tree is really useful.

Good pictures of stern ties here.
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Old 02-13-2014, 10:30 PM   #36
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I have a range finder, bought from GI JOES just before their going out of business. I use it all the time anchoring. In a busy anchorage, you can pick your spot, take range finder readings off surrounding boats, and drop the hook, and feel pretty good about not drifting into other boats. Eyeballing it I always find that I think I am closer to others than I am. Also good for beach references. I think mine is good for 300 meters. Another not too expensive tool.
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Old 02-14-2014, 06:01 AM   #37
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> A stern anchor in an area with reversing tidal current will put the current against the stern at some point.<

WE set the stern anchor off the stern , but walk the line fwd ( its only 3/8 so not heavy) and give a tug to set the anchor .

In the AM its usually 12 hours since anchoring , so the boat is facing the same way in a tidal current, the stern line is walked aft and simply pulled up.

Yes,,, a pair of old sail winches at the stern are great for any boat , but the use is usually for docking , not retrieving an almost up/down 20 lb anchor and 5 ft of chain.

Total time to set the stern anchor a minuet or two, joy of not getting out of the sack at O dark 30 to check or reset , UNLIMITED.
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Old 07-28-2014, 09:46 PM   #38
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Greetings,
Mr. S. I suppose you could bring your clubs and hit a few balls off your aft trunk.
As fun as that sounds it would never work for me.... I have a wicked slice
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Old 07-29-2014, 12:03 AM   #39
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I set the tracking on the Nobeltec. Gives a visual representation if we are doing tide swing (normal) or something more(dragging). A longish tail outside of swing circle will alert watchstander.
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