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Old 06-30-2014, 06:25 AM   #21
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When we power set the anchor we use a snubber - a bridle actually - so that the pressure is off the windlass. Once with my old windlass the bridle slipped and the pull hit the windlass and snapped the windlass' break bar.

While we have a well mounted beefy windlass, I don't think that either the deck or the windlass were designed for the loads that are present when we power set or even when the boat is at anchor in 30+ kt winds.
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Old 06-30-2014, 12:14 PM   #22
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Power setting the anchor

Being on the Mississippi River I've found the current does a fine job of setting my FX-37 and the longer I stay the deeper it goes. In less current or slack water I use 1 engine in reverse at idle for 30 seconds or so, I normally anchor in 10' to 20' and put out 100' to 150' of chain.
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Old 06-30-2014, 12:54 PM   #23
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I have a 35 Danforth and all 5/16 chain. I let the wind "tease" the anchor in to set it initally at approx 60 feet (maybe 5 or 6 :1), then I let out to 9 or 10:1 then let the wind set it a little deeper. Then I rig my snubber (single 1/2 inch 3 strand nylon) then I'll use idle or maybe up to 900 rpm in reverse to dig it in. Single FL 120 so that ain't much power.
That has worked fine for me.
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Old 06-30-2014, 03:21 PM   #24
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I have twin 270 cummins and only use idle. Anything more could case damage to the boat in my opinion.
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Old 07-01-2014, 01:56 PM   #25
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Same as articspud for us. I have all chain out so I just idle until the boat arrests and then set my snubber. I have given it more power but it is not necessary. I prefer to keep the strain off of the windlass and bow pulpit....
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Old 07-02-2014, 04:29 PM   #26
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Just for a contrary point of view, dropping a new design hook, then immediately backing down on it makes zero sense to me, and we never do it. In my (apparently solitary) view, powering in reverse on an anchor that isn't set in order to set it does the opposite. The rode goes tight, the shank lifts off the sea bed and an anchor that might be settling in for a good set starts plowing. If you must back down, do so a couple hours after dropping the anchor. That gives time for the hook to nestle into the sea bed and dramatically improves set. IMO and experience, the kind of tug and release that is experienced at anchor will bury most hooks, while power backing with an immediate steady strain equivalent to 40 knots on them will pop many hooks out.
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Old 07-02-2014, 05:41 PM   #27
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Delfin I think you're right.

Slow setting an anchor is best.
But most of us don't have that much patience. An attitude of "get-er-done" like we do everything else in this culture prevails.
Pulling on the rode lifts the shank unless you've got out lots of scope and lifting the shank is the best way of breaking out there is.
I often look at an anchor's geometry and judge if it should work better at short scope. I think it can be easily seen that the Claws should have less of a tendency to pitch up and break out (w the same angle of pull from the rode) as other anchors. This angle is adjustable on the Fortress and the Super Max. And I think many anchors that set normally on their sides suffer because their throat angle can't be very wide or they will not set well. The tip of the fluke will be too much "sideways". And the reputation of Claws holding well at short scope is well known.
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Old 07-02-2014, 08:11 PM   #28
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IG36, twin 120 Lehmans, Super Sarca. We idle reverse paying out chain. Once it sets, idle reverse until resistance, then give it a little more reverse, depending on depth, chain out, conditions. Snubber goes on post set, seems ok on the 33yo. Muir windlass, it got a new motor recently, gearbox/drive needing no service other than greasing.
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Old 07-02-2014, 11:41 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Delfin View Post
Just for a contrary point of view, dropping a new design hook, then immediately backing down on it makes zero sense to me, and we never do it. In my (apparently solitary) view, powering in reverse on an anchor that isn't set in order to set it does the opposite. The rode goes tight, the shank lifts off the sea bed and an anchor that might be settling in for a good set starts plowing. If you must back down, do so a couple hours after dropping the anchor. That gives time for the hook to nestle into the sea bed and dramatically improves set. IMO and experience, the kind of tug and release that is experienced at anchor will bury most hooks, while power backing with an immediate steady strain equivalent to 40 knots on them will pop many hooks out.
Couldn't agree more Delf, with respect to the newer designs. With the old CQR types if you didn't give them a quick tug to engage the bottom, often they would just lie on their side, and especially with that damned hinged shank, they could just gayly bounce along the bottom forever. Especially if there was weed around or a firmish bottom.
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Old 07-03-2014, 12:37 AM   #30
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Seem to always have a two-knot-or-so tidal current, so hadn't the need to use the engine to dig in the anchor. I'm more concerned of the four-times-a-day tidal reversal rather than the initial anchor setting. So far, the claw has kept stuck in the heavy SF estuarian mud.
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Old 07-03-2014, 07:15 AM   #31
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I use idle reverse on one engine for about 10 sec observing 2 static points abeam to ensure the anchor is set. Then I repeat the procedure with the other engine. Engines are Cummins 330 hp each. Idle reverse only. Crossing my fingers, I've never dragged.
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Old 07-03-2014, 09:32 AM   #32
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I let my 45# CQR set on its own in the current and not dragging. Before leaving the boat or going to bed, I test it with idle in reverse. So far no dragging in reversing tides. Then again I'm still a newbie with the CQR.
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Old 07-03-2014, 10:44 AM   #33
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I have seen the "anchor" on the bow of Delfin... I think that due to its weight is is more of a mobile mooring anchor... when they weigh that much it sinks into the sea bed on its own. Not a wonder that Carl can let is "settle" on its own.

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Old 07-03-2014, 11:06 AM   #34
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Again, that's why I only use idle for a short moment. With enough scope and gentle backing down, the chain should still be on the bottom and hook will get an initial bite. If there is no wind or current, I am talking about 1 knot. Just a bump or two.
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Old 07-03-2014, 12:46 PM   #35
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One thing to remember...just because an anchor "grabs" by no means does that mean it is set unless you check visually.

The tip could have hooked something such as a rock, grass clump, mussel patch, shopping cart, etc...etc...

The only way you know it will hold to the conditions that might arise is to destructively test that set...whether immediately or after letting the anchor "settle" which I think is silly unless you are over deep silt or extraordinarily soft mud...which I wouldn't knowingly anchor in anyhow.

That's why unless I'm in water that I can dive on my anchor....I don't trust most anchoring situations to save my boat. Sure I buy and do what is the norm for anchors and techniques...and I feel secure when I do it...but I also don't anchor or stay at anchor if I'm expecting more than mild conditions...and I don't think the average local area thunderstorm even in FLA is a threat unless I'm going to be off the boat.

People have made fun of me and my anchoring philosophy here...I really don't care because my boat is the only roof over my head that I have and that's pretty important to me....basically the same as betting anyone a million bucks that their anchor will hold though anything short of a Cat III cane and above.

What works for you is great till it doesn't...then what?
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Old 07-03-2014, 03:05 PM   #36
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What works for you is great till it doesn't...then what?
After 35 years and 40,000 miles when it stops working I'll let you know.

If weather conditions warrant, by all means check the set. If you think the best time to do that is to power in reverse as soon as the hook hits bottom have at it. However, you can do a little experiment to see whether it is a good practice or not. Anchor 30 times powering down immediately. Count how many times the anchor drags. Now anchor 30 times and go have a beer and take a nap before powering down and compare. My guess - you won't drag with a decent anchor and appropriate scope if you give the anchor a bit of time to do its job.
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Old 07-03-2014, 04:14 PM   #37
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Yes Delfin,
I read about slow setting anchors on an anchor test and several other places. Haven't ever done that the way Delfin describes but I do take my time setting the anchor, watching the rode and enjoying the view from the bow. And if you want to know ... no I get it over with in the wind and rain.

And I think if one got a fast set when wind or current reversed the anchor should reset or set again w almost bullet proof dependability. However if you had an iffy first set ....

Peter if you've not welded the CQR hinge together how would you know if the hinge was good or bad. I'd like to try that. Got no CQR though.
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Old 07-03-2014, 06:36 PM   #38
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After 35 years and 40,000 miles when it stops working I'll let you know.

If weather conditions warrant, by all means check the set. If you think the best time to do that is to power in reverse as soon as the hook hits bottom have at it. However, you can do a little experiment to see whether it is a good practice or not. Anchor 30 times powering down immediately. Count how many times the anchor drags. Now anchor 30 times and go have a beer and take a nap before powering down and compare. My guess - you won't drag with a decent anchor and appropriate scope if you give the anchor a bit of time to do its job.
I'll agree that the anchor needs time to align and start it's dig...and your point about setting it later isn't a bad one if convenient...

I believe that motion and tension on the anchor rode is what sets an anchor...not just weight...so there has to be something keeping a bit more tension on an all chain setup if the boat is just being held by chain and no tension is getting back to the anchor.

I don't think in most bottoms I would anchor in...just time letting the anchor laying on the bottom does anything without the rode being involved.
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Old 07-03-2014, 06:51 PM   #39
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Quote:
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... Anchor 30 times powering down immediately. Count how many times the anchor drags. Now anchor 30 times and go have a beer and take a nap before powering down and compare....
Nigel Calder recommends making a cup of tea before a final set check. A beer and a nap, why not? Try some "horizontal folk dancing"? Make anchoring fun, not a chore.
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Old 07-03-2014, 07:50 PM   #40
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Again...it's more art than science...a visual is the best and why the saying "it's better in the Bahamas" rings true to many a cruiser.

What works for you is what you stick with...but like I posted before...only till it doesn't.

That point is that sometimes we all can learn a trick or two more. Locals often are FOS and sometimes they give up a jewel. The trick is to be able to decipher the FOS lines and focus on the jewel...it can be written also...even right here by our very own.
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