Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 06-05-2016, 08:33 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
City: Houma, Louisiana
Country: USA
Vessel Name: M/V LUNASEA
Vessel Model: 45ft Bluewater Coastal
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 405
Placing Cleats On Dock

We have finished building our new dock. We have a 45ft boat, how do you tell where and how many cleats to put. Ropes will stay on dock when boat not there. Boat will only be tied on one side.
__________________
Advertisement

kartracer is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2016, 08:49 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
bilge53's Avatar
 
City: Oriental, NC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: M/V Major Award
Vessel Model: Senator 35 w/single Lehman
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 420
Do you have tall pilings?
__________________

bilge53 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2016, 09:04 AM   #3
Guru
 
caltexflanc's Avatar
 
City: North Carolina for now
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Small Incentive
Vessel Model: Boston Whaler 130 Sport
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 3,801
You can't have too many cleats.
__________________
George

"There's the Right Way, the Wrong Way, and what some guy says he's gotten away with"
caltexflanc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2016, 09:20 AM   #4
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,714
HaHa cal,
You can have too much of anything. Any more than five would be a waste of money and time spent. Or a tripping hazard.

Two spring lines a midship line and a bow and stern line. That's it.
__________________
Eric

North Western Washington State USA
Nomad Willy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2016, 10:05 AM   #5
Guru
 
High Wire's Avatar
 
City: Cape May, NJ and Englewood, FL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Irish Lady
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 1,602
X2 for tying to pilings vs cleats.
__________________
Archie
1984 Monk 36 Hull #46
Englewood, FL and Cape May, NJ
High Wire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2016, 11:20 AM   #6
Guru
 
dhays's Avatar
 
City: Gig Harbor
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Kinship
Vessel Model: North Pacific 43
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 5,093
Depending on the configuration of you dock I would say 4. If the dock makes an angle, i.e. You have a dock at the bow or stern as well then a couple there as well.

Never tied to pilings. With 15' tide changes that doesn't end up well. Your area is likely different.

On the cleats, thru bolt them. Don't screw them in.
__________________
Regards,

Dave
SPOT page
dhays is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2016, 01:03 PM   #7
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,914
Floating or fixed?

Tide range?

Point of boarding?

Hurricane hole or will the boat be moved? How protected if staying?
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2016, 01:17 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
City: Houma, Louisiana
Country: USA
Vessel Name: M/V LUNASEA
Vessel Model: 45ft Bluewater Coastal
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 405
Straight bulkhead no pilings, fixed, tide 2ft, very well protected behind my house. My question is should dock cleats be even with boat cleats, or how far from back and front of boat should they be.
kartracer is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2016, 01:32 PM   #9
Guru
 
menzies's Avatar
 
City: Jacksonville
Country: USA
Vessel Name: SONAS
Vessel Model: Grand Alaskan 53
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 2,204
I would add four to the side the boat will be tied to and at least another two to the opposite side of the dock for doubling up when there is a storm forecast.
menzies is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2016, 01:33 PM   #10
Guru
 
menzies's Avatar
 
City: Jacksonville
Country: USA
Vessel Name: SONAS
Vessel Model: Grand Alaskan 53
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 2,204
Quote:
Originally Posted by kartracer View Post
Straight bulkhead no pilings, fixed, tide 2ft, very well protected behind my house. My question is should dock cleats be even with boat cleats, or how far from back and front of boat should they be.
Put one at each end of the dock. Then the other two equal spaced along the dock.
menzies is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2016, 02:41 PM   #11
Guru
 
O C Diver's Avatar
 
City: Fort Myers, FL... Summers in Crisfield, MD
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Slow Hand
Vessel Model: Cherubini Independence 45
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 4,818
Just like anchors: They're too small and you don't have enough of them.

Ted
__________________
Blog: mvslowhand.com
I'm tired of fast moves, I've got a slow groove, on my mind.....
I want to spend some time, Not come and go in a heated rush.....
"Slow Hand" by The Pointer Sisters
O C Diver is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2016, 04:02 PM   #12
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,914
I would place one fore and aft of the ends of the boat by about 6 feet and one near the middle for an aft bow spring and a forward after spring.

Unless that is going to interfere with boarding...then place a couple where they won't interfere for the 2 springs.

How are you going to attach? Lags don't last too long if there is much upward pull on the cleats....they work loose pretty quick all too often.
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2016, 08:48 PM   #13
Guru
 
koliver's Avatar
 
City: Saltspring Island
Country: BC, canada
Vessel Name: Retreat
Vessel Model: C&L 44
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 2,173
You say the boat's lines stay with the dock.
Therefore, your cleats are for other lines, as those ones will be attached permanently in some other fashion, with the free end to be tied on the boat or if you splice eyes in them, dropped over cleats on the boat.
For visitors, you will need a cleat at each end of the dock and one or two more, evenly spaced to accept their lines.
koliver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2016, 10:30 PM   #14
Guru
 
cappy208's Avatar
 
City: Cape Cod
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Slip Aweigh
Vessel Model: Prairie 29
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 1,131
You have to take into account several issues.

The First is: The strength of the dock.

Second: The Length of the boat in relation to the available dock mooring area.

Third: the range of tide. (this has to include the amount of time you WON'T be there to tend lines in a storm)


Your Lines must be made fast to substantial dock fixtures. Whether it is cleats, bollards or Pilings is up to you. The more substantial the fixture the more serenely you sleep as the wind howls.

From a practical aspect: The boat has three ranges of motion you have to account for.

These types of movement require two distinct types of lines.

Spring lines and Breast lines.

Spring lines are almost parallel to the boat. These prevent 'ranging' up and down the length of the dock.


Breast lines are almost sideways. These prevent 'surging' on and off the dock.

But in NO case are these lines simply straight across to the dock.

They all must be led at an angle to allow for the tide height as well as the wind/current.

From my experience NO line (with a 2' tide range) should have less than a 6' length from boat to dock. Probably more like 8'!

I would also heavily consider an offshore line (to prevent dock side damage) from either an anchor or another fixture to pull the boat away from the dock.
cappy208 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2016, 10:48 PM   #15
Master and Commander
 
markpierce's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Carquinez Coot
Vessel Model: 2011 Seahorse Marine Coot hull #6
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 10,265
Have three cleats in each side of the berth. Works OK but I'd prefer four.

__________________
Kar-KEEN-ez Koot
markpierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2016, 06:55 AM   #16
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,531
Fasten to what is under the deck boards , use BOLTS not screwes.

Extra cleats are fine as it gives a place for extra fenders , useful even on a fully faced dock.

Your boat is there now , in a few years the next owner will love the ability to tie his .

We have almost 200ft of dock, no cleats just tie to the posts every 8 ft or so.

Other folks in the area bolt cleats to the pilings as many visitors no longer know how to tie to a piling.
FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2016, 07:19 AM   #17
Guru
 
jleonard's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 2,740
I like my bow and stern cleats to be even with the boat's cleats or hawse holes, whichever applies. Then fore and aft spring cleats perhaps 1/3 to 1/2 the boat length.
Long lags into the dock supports (2x10 etc) will be fine. That's how our marina is built and they are dock builders. That's their business.
__________________
Jay Leonard
Attitude Adjustment
40 Albin
Mystic,Ct. /New Port Richey,Fl
jleonard is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2016, 07:35 AM   #18
Guru
 
City: Satsuma FL
Country: United States
Vessel Name: No Mo Trawla
Vessel Model: Hurricane SS188
Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 1,681
Have seen a lot of docks destroyed by tropical storms including my own. The pilings usually survive but not always. I would suggest putting the cleats on the pilings. They won't save your boat but likely will be there when you bring it back.
Donsan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2016, 07:36 AM   #19
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,914
There are many ways to tie up a vessel adequately.

Some using just lines, even ways where the number of lines vary .

Using devices other than just lines like tide sliders also can alter the equation.

I find some have very specific concepts of how it should be done and others much more relaxed about it yet the vessel rides fine both ways.

Picking your line use will probably determine the cleat placement rather than the other way around.

A good example would be the stern line. In many situations the vessel may use the near bulkhead cleat yet in other situations or vessel layouts, the outboard stern cleat may do a better job.

A lot of variables to consider.
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-06-2016, 07:42 AM   #20
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,914
Quote:
Originally Posted by kartracer View Post
Straight bulkhead no pilings, fixed, tide 2ft, very well protected behind my house. My question is should dock cleats be even with boat cleats, or how far from back and front of boat should they be.
Just to refresh the basic info.....

And as a final for me.... I stand by my first suggestion and it is similar to cappy's so placing the cleats further out to 8 feet beyond the boats cleats/hawseholes/ends is great too. For a 2 foot tide, the shape of the vessel could easily increase or decrease those lengths by a bit, but around there.....probably fine. Yet too far and the angles make it more difficult to keep the vessel nearer the bulkhead.
__________________

psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:11 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012