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Old 09-06-2014, 12:18 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Bay Pelican View Post
Ted

If you are going to the Caribbean (not just the Bahamas) suggest you buy 400 ft new while you are still in the United States. Have one 400 ft rode. The other rode for a backup should have 50 ft of chain and 300 of line. If weight is an issue the first rode could be 350 ft of chain and 50 of line.

Many anchorages are deep 30-45 feet and the winds are strong with even stronger gusts. Many trawlers tend to anchor out at the back of the pack which means even deeper water.

Last year alone coral/debris cut the rope rode of two friends and there is a good argument for a chain rode. Also dropping and lifting all chain can be easier and you will be doing a lot of that.
I have heard many folks at Cruiser Forum echo this same advice for Mexico. Seems the boats that woke up on the beach typically are combo rodes with parted lines. Finding a boat on the beach with an all chain rode is about as rare as rocking horse poop. Coral is to blame there too.
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Old 09-06-2014, 12:54 PM   #22
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Apophyge wrote;
"We had a second anchor that had a boat length of chain spliced to 300' of 3/4" nylon rode. I think a boat length is a good rule of thumb for chain, it will keep you anchor shank down till you ought to awake anyway."

I agree. I think Chapman's says as much. We have 400' of nylon "Brait" and about 16' of chain but the first 3' is much heavier than would normally be used on a 30' boat.

I like a long rode not so much for anchoring but to keep off a windward shore when the engine quits. I used to say if the engine quits but now that it has I say "when" the engine quits. People smarter than myself would start off w "when".
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Old 09-06-2014, 02:15 PM   #23
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Unlike Marin you make a very good point Scott.

When I carry my box about w the rode inside I'm always amazed at how much it weighs. The wet line IS quite heavy and as Scott stated it sheds weight slowly. My rode has been in it's box for two years now and it still is considerably heaver than I would have thought. But I do think nylon is the better rode. And so does Chapman.

Marin all the anchors I have, have never dragged or failed me in ant way. Jay Leno has lots of cars ... I have lots of anchors.
I think having no windlass (does that make you windlass-less?) is a good reason for having little or no chain. It's a lot of work lifting a boat's length of chain. I can't imagine hoisting more than that by hand.
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Old 09-06-2014, 02:45 PM   #24
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I second the suggestion of adding a length of soft line to your chain which allows you to cut your rode free in time of emergency. You don't want to be wishing you had bolt cutters or working away with a hacksaw.
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Old 09-06-2014, 03:40 PM   #25
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Al your point is well made even though I do have a capstan. I just winch up the rode until chain comes over the roller and then pull by hand. Just pulling the last few feet is real easy compared to the whole rode and I often anchored in 50' of water in Alaska.

But pulling the rode w the capstan requires some physical effort too. But I'm only 74 Al and when I get to 84 let's re-evaluate.
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Old 09-06-2014, 04:15 PM   #26
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I added 100 feet of yellow poly to the end of my anchor chain..in a real emergency cutaway...and no time to add a buoy...it may help when looking to pick it up at a later time.
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Old 09-06-2014, 10:04 PM   #27
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We have 220' of chain on our boat and I have thought of adding another 100 as per Marin's thought. Have not decided if I want to go with line or chain yet, but the deep waters of B.C. Make me think adding more rode is a good thing. We have yet to drag and I do like the peace of mind our chain gives us. I have dragged/drug a CQR in our Albin 25 which had 80 ft of chain and 200 feet of three ply nylon. But I am not the anchor expert by any means and will continue to uses what works for us. I believe the extra weight of the chain is a benefit as the slack gets taken up when the boat is in a high wind situation. I have watched our GB extend the rode and watch the rode sink back down to slack conditions as the gusts move through.
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Old 09-06-2014, 10:13 PM   #28
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I have heard many folks at Cruiser Forum echo this same advice for Mexico. Seems the boats that woke up on the beach typically are combo rodes with parted lines. Finding a boat on the beach with an all chain rode is about as rare as rocking horse poop. Coral is to blame there too.
How long were their lengths of chain and how deep was the water they were anchored in?
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Old 09-06-2014, 10:25 PM   #29
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After reading everyone's comments, I have no clue as to what I should do with my system.
Exactly when it comes down to picking anchors chain and or rode despite all the tests and #s it comes down to opinion. What do you feel comfortable with and who do you want to believe? I apply the use factors location-depth-expected weather -type of boat etc. Then I apply some of the published test results. Then I pick an anchor and rode based on my biased opinions.
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Old 09-23-2014, 04:48 PM   #30
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I love this thread...
I have a Lofrans Project 1500 24v windlass with a gypsy that handles 3/8" chain and 3/4" nylon. It also has a warping capstan on top. I own a 60 lb. CQR anchor and have a HUGE anchor locker, so all chain? 300' to 400' ? I am sure I should get a Danforth too....what size/weight? And should it's rode be all chin or combo?
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Old 09-23-2014, 05:30 PM   #31
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Oh-oh! You opened a can of worms.
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Old 09-23-2014, 05:39 PM   #32
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Worm #1,

I tend to view chain and it's weight as an assist to setting.

Unless one has an anchor that does poorly at short scope chain has little if any benefit to holding excluding one's swing radius. It will take more wind to raise an anchor's shank at lower velocities but when the chain is straight from a very strong wind holding power wise chain has no advantage.

Heavy chain will greatly reduce one's swing radius though so perhaps if an all chain rode on a given boat was 300lbs putting 280lbs into the first 100' and nylon line for the rest would deliver a really small swing radius. But what advantage would that be if someone like me anchored close w almost all nylon line rode?

I've seen fishing boats in Alaska w heavy ground tackle basically not move at all. Anchor chain straight down the whole time. That would be a good motive for me to consider chain. However I rarely get any water on my windshield and assume a big reason for that is my light bow.
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Old 09-23-2014, 06:36 PM   #33
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However I rarely get any water on my windshield and assume a big reason for that is my light bow.

I've heard you claim this before with the same level of uncertainty Eric. Why not load the equivalent of 300' of anchor chain on your bow and go for a ride to test that theory one day?
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Old 09-23-2014, 08:33 PM   #34
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I am not uncertain.

It's obviously going to increase the probability of that happening. As you know I'm against unnecessary weight on a boat but not to the extent of switching to plastic cleats or removing the ballast that Rod Smith (Willard designer) thought was necessary. But the benefit of half of an all chain rode is so questionable I take a stand against it.

And if I was to do the experiment you suggest and not get (as far as I could tell) my windshield any wetter do you think I'd want to go for the chain? Not so. Unnecessary weight on a boat is bad. And needs to be reduced or eliminated when found. For a better boat. I'm always trying to make my boat better. Sometimes I do that by the direction and deeds of others and sometimes I think for myself. Sometimes I may make a fool of myself but I think it's not often.

Think of this. If a chain has 1 or 2' of catenary while the wind is blowing how much good is the weight of the top half of the all chain rode doing to help catenary lower or keep down the shank of the anchor? I think I can actually show that it helps raise the anchor shank and increase the probability of the anchor breaking out. Perhaps in two ways.
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Old 09-24-2014, 03:40 PM   #35
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Eric, just for the sake of discussion, 300' of 1/4" G4 chain with a WLL of 2, 600 lbs weighs 225 pounds. If you put out 200'+ in a 10 to 1 scope, run a proper snubber to eliminate shock loading, your boat hasn't got enough surface area water and / or wind to lift the first 5' out of the mud. The same isn't true for rope with a smidgen of chain. If 225 pounds less your current rope and chain is too much additional weight in the bow, you're already way to close to the limit.

Glad you setup works for you. Arguing that an all chain road would compromise the safety of your vessel or would be inferior in a blow is going to be a hard sell.

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Old 09-24-2014, 04:29 PM   #36
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Thoughts of splicing rope to chain. Directly to end link with an eye splice? Eye splice to a thimble to be schackeled to a swivel or a splice weave into about 3 feet of chain? Thoughts?
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Old 09-24-2014, 04:46 PM   #37
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Why 3 feet of chain? Seems hardly worth the trouble.
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Old 09-24-2014, 05:10 PM   #38
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Why 3 feet of chain? Seems hardly worth the trouble.

I hope ur kidding... 3 foot weave into the chain from end of weave to anchor all chain perhaps 200 feet. from end of chain to end of rope perhaps 200 feet of nylon.

3 different techniques of attaching chain to nylon.
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Old 09-24-2014, 05:19 PM   #39
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Mule, If you have an iPhone or iPad, get the app called Grog Knots. Look at the marine section and choose "chain splice". It's similar to an eye splice. Works well and looks good!

I would, however, use an eye splice with a thimble and connect to the chain with the appropriate-sized shackle. Stronger with less stress on the line. Forget about the swivel; all that does is keep the swivel manufacturers in business, IMO!
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Old 09-24-2014, 05:24 PM   #40
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I thought the rule of thumb was the length of chain should be about the same as the length of your boat. I don't recall where I heard that but it sounded good to me and, so far, it seems to be working just fine for me in the Chesapeake.
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