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Old 12-19-2010, 08:01 AM   #21
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RE: On the Hook

Quote:
Woodsong wrote:

Larry, Was your previous boat sail or power? Sounds like fun to me!
It was sailboat, a*Slocum 43.* We lived and cruised on her for 10 years.**And it was fun.* Thanks for asking.

Larry/Lena
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*
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Old 12-19-2010, 08:12 AM   #22
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On the Hook

Quote:
Moonstruck wrote:

*
rwidman wrote:

Of course, if you can teach your crew and guests how to conserve water and power, you can stay longer in the same boat. Running the water while you wash the dishes or brush your teeth is a good example of how not to conserve water!*
If you don"t get carried away with conservation* I read where one couple on a sailboat in the Carribean chewed out their guests for washing the backs of dinner plates* They realized that then*they had gotten a little over the top!

*


Since the sink on my boat looks like the sink at home and water comes out when you operate the handle, it's a little difficult for some folks to realize that there's a limited supply of water and it will eventually run out.* It's possible to wipe each plate, pot, etc. with a paper towel, and then use a minimal amount of detergent and water to finish the job.* At least that's how I look at it.*

I figure if I say anything, the response will be "Do you want to wash them yourself?"

*


-- Edited by rwidman on Sunday 19th of December 2010 09:12:41 AM
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Old 12-19-2010, 08:41 AM   #23
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RE: On the Hook

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FF wrote:

For most cruisers its the water supply that is the limit .*
**



-- Edited by FF on Sunday 19th of December 2010 06:08:17 AM
I know that for long periods away from a fresh water source that some folks (mostly sailboats) will use a rain catchment system to replenish their supply (mostly in the tropics).* I have read that as long as the rain is coming in from the water (ocean)*and not the land, that it should be ok to consume. *It doesn't sound like rain water is used by many of you folks to replenish your tanks.* Any particular reason?*** KJ****

*
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Old 12-19-2010, 08:49 AM   #24
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On the Hook

*

*
Who does dishes when paper/plastic work.* If it can not be prepared and eaten out of the same container in under 5 minutes its to complex and messy.* We have not washed dishes, turned of the stove/oven for 5 plus years.* Our electric water pump has a low PSI, and it makes a lot of noise so I can hear it.* There is nothing that can not be done in 15 seconds, except a shower which should take a couple of minutes.* A small water heater fixes that problem. **After years of living a board you lean to conserve.*

Many long range boats have trash compactors as standard equipment.*

-- Edited by Phil Fill on Sunday 19th of December 2010 09:50:13 AM

-- Edited by Phil Fill on Sunday 19th of December 2010 09:51:26 AM
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Old 12-19-2010, 08:56 AM   #25
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On the Hook

Quote:
Phil Fill wrote:

*
*
Who does dishes when paper/plastic work.* If it can not be prepared and eaten out of the same container in under 5 minutes its to complex and messy.* We have not washed dishes, turned of the stove/oven for 5 plus years....
*You're kidding, right?


-- Edited by Larry M on Sunday 19th of December 2010 09:57:15 AM
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Old 12-19-2010, 09:18 AM   #26
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On the Hook

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Phil Fill wrote:Who does dishes when paper/plastic work.

After years of living a board you lean to conserve.*

We enjoy the "luxury" of eating off our K Mart matched set of white tableware.*And dollar store*utensils.* *Paper plates sag and drop food, are difficult to cut (steak and such) on, and tend to bolow over or into the water if there's any wind.* Plastic utensils?*

And pots and pans are going to get dirty if you cook food.* If nothing else, I have to wash the coffee maker and cup.

Conserving is one thing, living like a hermit is another.* I have a nice home to go to, spending time on my boat is a luxury for me.* It's my "second home".

BTW: I don't think using "throw away" plates and utensils is really "conserving".* At least it's not environmentally friendly.

*


-- Edited by rwidman on Sunday 19th of December 2010 10:22:11 AM

-- Edited by rwidman on Sunday 19th of December 2010 10:27:39 AM
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Old 12-19-2010, 09:25 AM   #27
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RE: On the Hook

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KJ wrote:


FF wrote:

For most cruisers its the water supply that is the limit .*
**



-- Edited by FF on Sunday 19th of December 2010 06:08:17 AM
I know that for long periods away from a fresh water source that some folks (mostly sailboats) will use a rain catchment system to replenish their supply (mostly in the tropics).* I have read that as long as the rain is coming in from the water (ocean)*and not the land, that it should be ok to consume. *It doesn't sound like rain water is used by many of you folks to replenish your tanks.* Any particular reason?*** KJ****

*


If you're not on the ocean, that wouldn't work so well.* Every surface that collects the water would have to be very clean at all times.* How about bird droppings?

We have a wide variety of boats here, also a wide variety of boat uses and lifestyles.* What may be standard proceedure for some would not begin to work for others.

*
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Old 12-19-2010, 10:03 AM   #28
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RE: On the Hook

From what I understand most catchment systems are kept pretty*clean and it's generally excepted that you let it rain for about 15 minutes before collecting any water*to rinse off surfaces, and clean stuff out of the air. *A lot of the systems have double filters that keep*the bad stuff out of the*tanks. Some folks will*just fill up a bunch of 5 gal jugs for non consuming purposes.* A couple of folks have written that they have crossed the big blue and have never used water from shore, or only sparingly.* *
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Old 12-19-2010, 11:25 AM   #29
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RE: On the Hook

Our longest period of time on the hook "Unexpectedly/Unplanned" was for one week. Last year while traveling south on the Inside Passage we had to hole up in one heck of a blow. The wind blew day and night to the point where we felt that the smart move was to hold tight. The name of the bay on Admiralty Island escapes me at this moment, sorry. *But it was SW of the Brothers Island Group.*It always pays to have plenty of provisions aboard. Our only company was a few Brown Bears on the Beach and a ton of Bald Eagles that were feeding on fish as the tide turned. We would walk the beach when the tide was out and try to walk out to take a look at Stevens Passage, we had very poor VHF radio contact because of the local Mts. Admirality Island is one of the few place that We always carry a shot gun while on the beach, I always hate to carry a gun! But I'm happy to report that we have never had to use a gun while on our cruising adventures. We ate well and stayed warm.*When the weather calmed down we made our way over to Petersburg a few days late to visit our kids there.
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Old 12-19-2010, 11:51 AM   #30
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RE: On the Hook

We don't really anchor out long enough to have to worry overly about conserving water.
If I did, or do in the future (I hope), it would not take me long to install a separate raw water source at the galley sink maybe tee off of the washdown pump. Wash dishes in raw water, salt or fresh, and a quick rinse with potable water.

Steve W.
I believe this is common in sail boats and earlier trawlers?
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Old 12-19-2010, 07:57 PM   #31
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On the Hook

We've done two weeks at anchor (in several locations) without topping anything up.*

Pioneer holds 180 gals of water which will last two*of*us up to 20 days, but add two additional less frugal crew and we are empty after 7 days - unless it rains a lot. The wheelhouse roof is plumbed for rain-water collection. We let it rain heavily for 15mins to wash the crap off and then connect to the tanks.

-- Edited by Bendit on Sunday 19th of December 2010 09:08:06 PM
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Old 12-19-2010, 09:36 PM   #32
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RE: On the Hook

I suspect the true intent of this thread was to determine how long we could go before resupply. If that is the case, we can go for a week. Fresh water is the limiting factor. Power is via six golf cart batteries, to supply power to lights, electric toilet, and refrigerator. With a 105 amp alternator, we can re-charg quickly. Propane used for range and BBQ will last many weeks. The water must be used carefully, as we have only seventy gallons, but sponge baths with solar showers every other day, it lasts a week.

No, we don't spend more than a few days anywhere, so it's never a problem.
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Old 12-19-2010, 11:47 PM   #33
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RE: On the Hook

So, what is your strategy and favorite tools to clean off*the anchor gear before it comes aboard and fouls*the boat?
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Old 12-20-2010, 05:02 AM   #34
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RE: On the Hook

"I have read that as long as the rain is coming in from the water (ocean) and not the land, that it should be ok to consume. It doesn't sound like rain water is used by many of you folks to replenish your tanks. Any particular reason? "

Most of the posters here are usually inshore , so a stop in the marina for beer, gas and water takes less time than doing the laundry during a lunch break..

ALL rainwater has "dirt" in it called condensation nuclei it is required for the water droplets to form, all is easily filtered out with a Home Depot in line filter.

Sailors may have sun covers (boom tents) that can easily be raised to work as a water catchment, harder for marine motorists.

"So, what is your strategy and favorite tools to clean off the anchor gear before it comes aboard and fouls the boat?"

Simple proper boat and ground tackle design , in advance.


On out 90/90 the anchor comes up in a hawse hole , is carried over the water , so who cares about mud?

Same on the lobster boat a bow roller holds the anchor overboard .

ON both the chain is only long enough to engage the chain stopper bolted to the deck.

A bucket takes care of the 4-5 ft of chain. Since this chain never has to be fed thru a windlass it can be really over sized , to match the strength of the line, and big links are easier to clean than tiny.
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Old 12-20-2010, 07:24 AM   #35
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RE: On the Hook

Quote:
markpierce wrote:

So, what is your strategy and favorite tools to clean off*the anchor gear before it comes aboard and fouls*the boat?
Our favorite is tool Mother Nature.* If we have been anchored in the same spot*long enough for the anchor to start growing stuff, we just let out more chain for 2 to 3 days before we leave.* If we are in 20 feet*of water we'll let out another 25 feet or so.* As the*boat swings around,*the bottom does a nice job of cleaning off*the chain.**We also have a salt water wash-down on the bow.*

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Old 12-20-2010, 07:48 AM   #36
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RE: On the Hook

In our experience the messiest problem is mud on several or many feet of chain.* Our chain and anchor doesn't weigh as much as those of a large cruiser, and the PNW anchorages are fairly deep, so I can generally let the muddy part of the chain down into the water, and then yank it up and down a bit, which easily releases the mud.*

For sticky mud remaining on the anchor, or mud from the chain splattered around on the foredeck, a bucket with a line on it does the job.*

When the anchor brings up a collection of kelp, I'll lean over the bow pulpit rail and remove it by hand, with occasional help from the boathook.

A washdown hose on the foredeck might be nice, but would add obstacles to trip over, and seems unnecessarily complex on our small boat.
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Old 12-20-2010, 09:19 AM   #37
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RE: On the Hook

Our master shower is in the bow, so we use the shower hose.* This year I have to drag the chain out and clean it up as it's a little rusty especially at the bottom of the pile that does not get used.* *Might have to replace the last 50 to 100 ft of the chain. Athough, the chain locker could hold/pile more chain, and having an extra 100+ ft would not hurt in the PNW.
*
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Old 12-20-2010, 09:44 AM   #38
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RE: On the Hook

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...*and having an extra 100+ ft would not hurt in the PNW.
*
Am always curious as to how you anchor in the fjords.

*
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Old 12-20-2010, 10:01 AM   #39
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RE: On the Hook

I dont know yet as we have not anchored that much. Remember, I am a DOCK QUEEN.* *We have a 94 lb Fjord with 200 ft of chain, but would sleep better with the 146 lbs. Fjord and 300 ft of chain.* **A neighbor bought a big Ronoc anchor and swears by it for his 65 ft Pacific Marina.* Most of the PNW commercial trawlers and bigger boats have Fjords.* I tend to follow the commercial more than pleasure.* *
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Old 12-20-2010, 10:34 AM   #40
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RE: On the Hook

Quote:
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So, what is your strategy and favorite tools to clean off*the anchor gear before it comes aboard and fouls*the boat?
A previous owner installed a huge Jabsco washdown pump in the engine room powered by a 1hp Westinghouse AC motor.* It would not have been our choice as we have to start the generator to use it but since it's there I overhauled it a few years ago, repainted it, and that's what we use. It puts out 23 gpm and will blast pretty much anything off of anything.* There are deck spigots mounted at the bow and stern.

This pump is still available new--- it's classed as an agricultural pump--- but it's way expensive and the requirement for AC rules it out for any boats that don't have either a generator or a hell of a big battery bank with a high-amp inverter.

There are DC washdown pumps that would probably be a better choice.
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