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Old 11-02-2014, 12:48 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by BryanF View Post
So I have two anchors on the bow.
The small anchor is, I think, an old navy anchor.
The larger (second picture) looks sort of like a Danforth but I am not sure hence this post. I wondered if it was just a knock off or if it has a type of its' own. Any thoughts? I am thinking that we might keep that one and upgrade the old navy one to something from a more recent century.
The one on the top is a fordjord safety anchor. Alaska fisherman all had them.
I don't know if it is all they had or just all the boats had that kind? Still make them in seattle. (Not sure of spelling)
I had one on my old north sea trawler and never used it much. There is still a lot of them around. If you every come by Anacortes I would love to see your boat.
Don
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Old 11-02-2014, 07:56 AM   #22
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Don't replace the Danforth with a Fortress if you anchor in tidal or river currents, They are so light they take off like a kite and it's almost impossible to get them down where you want them i.e. that sand patch among the sea grass.

I would suspect that doesn't apply so much to the larger Fortress models. Given the FX-125 weighs about 70-lbs... I wouldn't expect it to sail too much...

I think I'd be inclined to investigate whether a Fortress might be better than the existing Danforth... but actually changing might be dependent on whether a replacement Fortress would actually be larger than the existing Danforth. Or if the different fluke angles might be an advantage. If not, maybe no advantage to Fortress.

The optional 45 fluke angle on the Fortress might or might not be useful. Better than the Forfjord in mud? If so, maybe permanently set the Fortress to the 45 angle? Or perhaps the 32 angle might be better than the Forfjord in some other substrate? (I have no insight into the Forfjord's strengths or weaknesses...)

Otherwise, changing the Fortress angle on the fly doesn't look like it'd be very easy in that particular installation...

Neat boat!

-Chris
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Old 11-02-2014, 10:44 AM   #23
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I have to agree on Boatpoker with this one...it's the very reason I had several friends get rid of theirs in all sizes...

The specific gravity of aluminum is only around 2.7 depending on the alloy. No matter heavy the anchor is...if it sized up proportionately...they all still tend to sail in a current without a lot of chain.

I still think Fortresses are great anchors...I'm just not betting on one for emergency use..and as a single engine guy...my anchor has to have my trust for setting when I need it even more so than just when it suits me.
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Old 11-02-2014, 11:20 AM   #24
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If it were me I'd keep the Danforth type but I see the opening at the fluke tips is quite wide. Higher chance than most to jam a rock between the fluke tips. I have an Danforth type that you'd probably really like but it was made by a salvage company. If your Danforth type works fine and dosn't snag rocks I'd keep it. If not I'd find the mother of all Danforths for a replacement.

As to the Forfjord I personally don't like them. I had one and couldn't get it to set where my Danforth set easily.
I think they also have a tendency to penetrate w one fluke and not the other. Unless the bottom is very very uniform one fluke would be very likely to get ahead of the other and soon one fluke would be straight down and the other straight up. Kind of like a kedge. So if it were my boat I'd ditch the Forfjord and put a Claw in it's place. The Claw fits in a Hawse pipe. Well if the dia is big enough.

Not long ago they installed the anchors on the Susan Gael. First time I'd seen a Claw in a hawse pipe.
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Old 11-02-2014, 02:21 PM   #25
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These older designs of anchor still work, but there are some better alternatives if you can fit them on your boat easily.

This is an Admiralty Stockless anchor (a relation of the Forfjord from a similar era) dragging on a Super-yacht. Notice the clouds of substrate produced by the dragging anchor.

The anchor concerned was several hundred kilograms, but has not even managed to rotate horizontal. Modern designs do much better.

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Old 11-02-2014, 08:16 PM   #26
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The fishermen in Alaska don't think so ... for what ever that is worth. Marin said he saw some in lower BC but I've never seen a new gen anchor on a fish boat in AK.

Generally speaking I think the new anchors have more holding power but are less dependable. With an increase in anchor size staying w an old anchor could be a better mousetrap over time. But the increase in dependability (if it exists) would come w a small weight penalty. People here seem not to worry about 50 to 100lbs (and more) of extra anchor chain to make their modern anchor perform but I think universally older anchors are not so dependent on chain. So perhaps the overall performance per pound of rode (including the anchor) may be higher .. w older anchors like a Danforth or Claw.

My first new gen anchor held us solid for a day and a half in a 50 knot gale but when deploying it the new gen anchor would set less than 50% of the time. I know most new gen anchors do much better than that but there's a reason most people use older design anchors ... probably because they work. It's not that simple though. But they all work .. those that have stood the test of time. Every anchor has it's weakness but the old ones have no secrets.

I have old anchors and new ones ... and appreciate both.
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Old 11-04-2014, 07:00 AM   #27
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>People here seem not to worry about 50 to 100lbs (and more) of extra anchor chain to make their modern anchor perform but I think universally older anchors are not so dependent on chain.<

Mr OGG , inventor of the Danforth initially used them with NO CHAIN .

A few years later the chain was added when they began to be accepted by White boats.
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