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Old 07-17-2013, 04:13 PM   #21
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I never knew word for that....and now I have two! You guys are swell!
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Old 07-17-2013, 11:19 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by skipperdude View Post
Did you splice it yourself?

It is amazing to me how many people that run boats can't even Tye a bowline let alone do a simple back splice or splice an eye.

Sd



I learned how to splice some time ago. I did some eyes for lines on my sailboat. Not that difficult with three strand with a good fid. For the rode though, I had a guy that I know that is a professional rigger splice it. It just makes me feel a little better. KJ
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Old 07-17-2013, 11:29 PM   #23
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We spliced the rope to the chain ourselves and actually found a good video on you tube that went through it step by step. We did make sure the process in the video corresponded to standard nautical references before going with it! LOL.

My rode has the line spliced to the chain also. I had never heard of or seen this configuration before and wasn’t quite sure how it would perform. On my trip down to the Keys and back, we anchored overnight quite a bit and had very strong winds and currents pretty frequently. The ground tackle worked fine, we never dragged, even with a short scope on some real skinny creeks. My rigger friend says that if done right, the splice should provide a very strong rig. I’m glad to see someone else uses it. KJ
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Old 07-18-2013, 12:48 AM   #24
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KJ wow that is cool. We just did a simple splice through the last link of chain. I've never seen anything like what you have!!
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Old 07-18-2013, 01:16 AM   #25
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KJ We just did a simple splice through the last link of chain.
I did the same as you & it's very strong.
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Old 07-18-2013, 06:20 AM   #26
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Originally Posted by KJ View Post
I learned how to splice some time ago. I did some eyes for lines on my sailboat. Not that difficult with three strand with a good fid. For the rode though, I had a guy that I know that is a professional rigger splice it. It just makes me feel a little better. KJ
did he do a long or short splice?
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Old 07-18-2013, 08:48 AM   #27
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Peter wasn't wrong...I's just the way I heard it said in Navy boot camp in 1959. I'm sure that in medical school, the more accepted "flake" is used. (Just joshing you, Peter! You know I love all the posts from "down under.")
Well...actually Walt, I stand corrected, according to that reference you posted. However, I never heard it used any other way than 'flake', so you learn a new thing every day, as they say.
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Old 07-18-2013, 09:23 AM   #28
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I have never seen that type of "splice". Maybe i have been living in a cave but it looks Rube Goldberg to me.
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Old 07-18-2013, 10:35 AM   #29
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I have never seen that type of "splice". Maybe i have been living in a cave but it looks Rube Goldberg to me.
Even if it fit, I don't think my gypsy would accept it.
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Old 07-18-2013, 12:32 PM   #30
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I have never seen that type of "splice". Maybe i have been living in a cave but it looks Rube Goldberg to me.
If you are referring to the long splice to a chin it is fairly common...especially for certain wildcats being able to pass it where a short "back" splice won't work with all windlasses.

That was also why my question whether the "pro rigger" used a long splice or short splice. Weird but the short splice is a tad stronger but like I said the increased diameter of the short or "back splice" to one link limits its use though windlasses and block/tackles.

http://www.theensign.org/uspscompass...hortsplice.htm
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Old 07-18-2013, 01:09 PM   #31
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If you are referring to the long splice to a chin it is fairly common...especially for certain wildcats being able to pass it where a short "back" splice won't work with all windlasses.

That was also why my question whether the "pro rigger" used a long splice or short splice. Weird but the short splice is a tad stronger but like I said the increased diameter of the short or "back splice" to one link limits its use though windlasses and block/tackles.

Mastering marlinespike: Short splice
Thats my point. It doesn't look like a long, or short splice. Not much uniformity through the links that I can see. I'm sure it has worked for them, but you wouldn't see it on my sled. I wouldn't be able to sleep with that set up.
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Old 07-18-2013, 01:33 PM   #32
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Thats my point. It doesn't look like a long, or short splice. Not much uniformity through the links that I can see. I'm sure it has worked for them, but you wouldn't see it on my sled. I wouldn't be able to sleep with that set up.
Are you referring to the picture of the anchor chain splice in post #23?

Didn't study it closely but it looked normal at a quick glance...even had some whipping on it (usually not done).

If it was done correctly I believe it has the strength of most other splices...maybe even stonger than the rope to rope long splice.
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Old 07-18-2013, 06:22 PM   #33
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Back to the faking side discussion/thread creep.

Here's a definition I found that is similar to what I recall doing from my early sailing days.

"Faking down a line is laying it up in the same manner as for coiling down, except that it is laid out in long, flat bights, one alongside the other, instead of in round coils"

Used to do this up and down a deck with rodes to get ready for anchoring.
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Old 07-18-2013, 06:55 PM   #34
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Right from a Yale Cordage White Paper....

"And, once the line becomes wet and is subsequently dried, it can become difficult to handle, resisting flaking or coiling"......

A White Paper Produced by Yale Cordage
September 2005
ANCHORING

TECHNOLOGY
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Old 07-18-2013, 07:32 PM   #35
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what about "splicing the main brace?"
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Old 07-18-2013, 08:08 PM   #36
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Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
Right from a Yale Cordage White Paper....

"And, once the line becomes wet and is subsequently dried, it can become difficult to handle, resisting flaking or coiling"......

A White Paper Produced by Yale Cordage
September 2005
ANCHORING

TECHNOLOGY
Rant time:

Probably written by an under 30 year old who hasn't done his or her etymologic research.

Probably the same person who said a certain boat/ship "floundered and sank". Nope. Sorry. The term is "foundered". That means that it filled with water and sank.

The English language is going to hell in a hand basket at an accelerating rate.

For instance, I cringe every time the weather person says: "Presently it is 80 degrees, but it will be cooler in awhile" when what is meant is: "At present it is 80 degrees, but presently it will be cooler".

End of rant.

Some say the language has been going downhill since pre-Beowulf days, if not before then. Some say its just constantly evolving.

Go here (left column): Making Up a Line

I used to really be into this nautical terminology as a kid. The definition of "Flemishing" a line in the above link lead my mind to "Flemish Horse".

Time for bed.
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Old 07-18-2013, 08:33 PM   #37
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dwhatty....very nice! A lesson from an old Merchant Marine sailor.

I came on here to bring up "Flemishing" but you already covered that.

Everything you said was as I experienced it in the U.S. Navy in 1959.

Thanks!
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Old 07-18-2013, 10:12 PM   #38
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I've been hearing flake and fake interchangeably for over 50 years....here's a source that thinks "flake" goes back to English naval power days...
Nautical Terms

I know there is a subtle difference in the words fake and flake...but to be honest...I'm not sure what it is any more....is one the act and the other the finished product as in "I am about to fake the line" and "that line on deck is flaked out"?

Either way both terms have been around....just most people are bastardizing at least one of them a lot.
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Old 07-18-2013, 11:56 PM   #39
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Well, I for one prefer 'flake', because I would hate to think anyone thought, when I demonstrated my seamanship skills, I was 'faking' it...
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Old 07-19-2013, 12:06 AM   #40
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The line/rope repair is a “short splice”. It appears to be pretty strong.

The line/anchor splice runs through the gypsy and hawse just fine, no problems at all.

As I said, we anchored overnight quite frequently with strong winds and currents and the gear held us in place every time.

Even though I had the alarms set, I would still get up a couple of times during the night to check our position. I kept a very big spotlight on the sundeck and would check our position relative to things on the shore like a particular bush or tree or lights that I had seen when we set the anchor.

Overall though, I had no problems sleeping while at anchor.

Thanks for the terminology dissertation.
Summer project: New interior for the SALOON/SALON. KJ
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