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Old 11-07-2011, 11:31 AM   #1
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Forfjord

The Forfjord is a twin fluke anchor definitely related to the Danforth but w three huge differences. Instead of being very light it's very heavy. The flukes are wide apart while the Danforths flukes are close together to very close together. And the Forfjord lacks the stock of the Danforth. At one time (I think) all anchors had stocks and the CQR, Dreadnaught and Forfjord were stockless and were referred to as stockless anchors. Without the stock the Forfjord was free to rotate within the bounds of what the flukes would allow. If the bottom is a little bit more favorable to penetration on one fluke it would dig in and I'm not sure if the other fluke would follow * ...or follow equally. Seems to me there would be a strong chance only one fluke would bury. And then the Forfjord would be much like a Kedge. But I had similar thoughts about the Bruce and as I recall those notions were shown to be wrong. But (also as I seem to recall) those that understand the Forfjord *said the beauty of that is that once buried the Forfjord, if pulled from another angle will allow one fluke to break out temporarily while the anchor repositions itself thus not really breaking out. Most to many anchors break out completely and need to reset completely. But the Forfjord does not have sharp flukes and little of the anchors weight is on the fluke tips when in a setting position on the bottom. And many are modified for better holding in mud by welding extensions onto the side of the flukes but that could make the penetrating issue even worse. Dragging in mud is obviously an issue as many of the Forfjords in Craig have the "mud mod". The Forfjord is probably almost indestructible *....even small ones. I've seen several Bruce's w bent shanks (one bent almost 90 degrees) but I've never seen a bent Forfjord. Since it's not a high holding power anchor one needs to carry a Forfjord about twice the weight of what they would normally carry. I can't recall any fishermen raving about the Forfjord but many do re the claw. I think more and more fishermen are changing to claws. Probably when they drag their Forfjord's and feel the need to change. They get the claw because it looks (and is I think) skookum and many more fishermen have them than anything else. My friend Ed here on the island w a 30' Willard has a 65lb Forfjord and has had good luck w it for well over 5 years and has no intention of changing his anchor. I have only had*a few minutes experience personally w the Forfjord so hopefully others w more experience will be able to expand or correct what I've thrown out here as a beginning.


-- Edited by nomadwilly on Monday 7th of November 2011 12:57:15 PM
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Old 11-07-2011, 06:29 PM   #2
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Forfjord

Quote:
nomadwilly wrote:
... Seems to me there would be a strong chance only one fluke would bury. And then the Forfjord would be much like a Kedge. But I had similar thoughts about the Bruce and as I recall those notions were shown to be wrong.*... I can't recall any fishermen raving about the Forfjord but many do re the claw. I think more and more fishermen are changing to claws. Probably when they drag their Forfjord's and feel the need to change. They get the claw because it looks (and is I think) skookum ....
*Tried out my 33# Bruce imitation today for the first time (finally).* In about 20 feet of water with a "sticky" mud bottom off Commodore Jones Point (Benicia, CA).* The anchor set rapidly and easily held the Coot in a 2-knot current with about a 4-to1 scope or less.


-- Edited by markpierce on Monday 7th of November 2011 07:46:52 PM
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Old 11-08-2011, 09:00 AM   #3
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RE: Forfjord

The Forfjord is our primary anchor as the Forfjord is on 95% of the commercial trawler over 50 ft and*many pleasure boats over 50 ft in the PNW/Puget Sound.* *I have not seen a Forfjord with the added wider flukes.* The Eagle came with two Danforth, bow and stern, and a QCR.* The QCR as the primary and the Danforths secured to the deck.***
*
I went to a commercial swap meet at Fishermans Terminal, Seattle,*and there was a Forfjord #8, 100 lbs for sale, which I bought.* *As it turns out the Eagle needs the next size bigger, a #12 at 145 Lbs.* However, the windless has enough trouble pulling up the #8, that I am concerned about the #12 with all chain.* If you size the Forfjord it is almost twice the weight and size of most other anchors, which is probable the reason you do not see them on many pleasure boats and they are not very pretty.
*
For a long range crusing, I still thing a boat should have at least a plow/claw and a navy/wide fluke*type anchor depending on the bottom.*
*
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Old 11-08-2011, 10:18 AM   #4
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Forfjord

Sounds like you should go shopping for a higher performance anchor or a bigger anchor winch. I'll sell you a reel winch that should have no problem w heavy gear for $400. The ideal anchor for your boat could be the Manson Ray (a fabricated (not cast)) claw. Expensive though. And yes I too see Navy anchors on some larger craft. Here's two examples of Navy anchors as primaries (one on a yacht) and two examples of Forfjords on 30' boats. Heavy anchors still seem to have their place in the modern world. Here's a pic of the winch too.


-- Edited by nomadwilly on Tuesday 8th of November 2011 11:22:17 AM
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Old 07-29-2015, 02:33 PM   #5
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Bump...

In pondering mode for a winter storm anchor and the #4 (40 pound) Forfjord is on the short list...probably with 100' of chain and up to 600' of 5/8 nylon 8 strand Brait. (This rope/chain length combination rode will exponentially increase the number of locations we can anchor. North coast BC's mountainous terrain results in most smaller bays rising steeply from around 100' depth to the shore).

Anybody have positive or negative experiences with the Forfjord?

http://www.seanet.com/~julie321/anchor_info.html
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Old 07-29-2015, 02:51 PM   #6
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The real question is do the have it in polished SS, and how good does it look on your bow. Later, you could add your own roll bar.
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Old 07-29-2015, 03:11 PM   #7
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Not a fan of the Forfjord.

Had one once and used one once. Was in a small bay off Rocky Pass in Alaska when my XYZ of the time would not set. Tried several times. Thought it may be a hard bottom. Was late and we needed to hook up there. Tried several times w a 25 lb Forfjord that I had reciently purchased. No luck at all. Threw out the 13 lb Danforth that came w the boat to me and as new I belive. Hooked up solid right away.

I truly believe they are a poor anchor. I suspect their performance is such that you'd be better off w a Claw .. that is similar in some ways and interestingly fishermen most often choose a Claw w they can't get their hands on a Forfjord. Sold my Forfjord to a fisherman for $25.

For you Murray I'm think'in a SARCA would be best.
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Old 07-29-2015, 04:21 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by manyboats View Post
For you Murray I'm think'in a SARCA would be best.
I'd agree with you, especially concerning the Excel, but if we ever lost one (say to an unmarked old booming ground and sunken logs) a replacement Forfjord from Vancouver would get here faster & cheaper than a Sarca from Australia.

That, and I'm pretty sure our bow can take a Forfjord wth no modifications...has original bow roller (much like in Willard photo) below the anchor pulpit which now holds a Lewmar Claw).
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Old 07-29-2015, 06:42 PM   #9
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I have a 65 lb. Forfjord in a hawse pipe against the port bow. It is a secondary anchor as it is vastly inferior to my primary anchor, a 45 lb. Manson supreme that is mounted on a centerline bow roller.

The primary reason I added the Forfjord, is that I needed to add weight forward to offset the additional weight of the pilot house. Rather than add something that serves no other purpose (like lead), I chose to add a heavy, secondary anchor.

The Forfjord sets reliably but does so with a very gentle and slow nature - not at all like the immediate "knock you off your seat" attachment to the bottom of the Manson. I do not yet have a good sense of ultimate holding power of the Forfjord but my guess it will be far less than the lighter Manson.

As was mentioned previously in this thread, the Forfjord must be just about indestructible and may be superior to the Manson in rock. Also, if very heavy weed is preventing the penetration of any anchor, the sheer weight of the Forfjord will give it the edge.

I would always choose a modern anchor over the Forfjord as a primary anchor.

Steve

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Old 07-29-2015, 06:55 PM   #10
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The Forfjord sets reliably but does so with a very gentle and slow nature - not at all like the immediate "knock you off your seat" attachment to the bottom of the Manson.
Thanks Steve...that's exactly the sort of comparative example I was looking for.
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Old 07-29-2015, 08:16 PM   #11
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I'd agree with you, especially concerning the Excel, but if we ever lost one (say to an unmarked old booming ground and sunken logs) a replacement Forfjord from Vancouver would get here faster & cheaper than a Sarca from Australia....
Mmm. There is a daily direct non stop flight between Sydney and Vancouver. Not sure about Melbourne(Anchorright location)-Vancouver, but there is a daily procession of Melbourne-Sydney flights. If you really want a Sarca it won`t take long. Ask Ksanders, he bought one. True, it won`t be cheaper.
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Old 07-29-2015, 08:27 PM   #12
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There is just "something" about an anchor clinging closely to a boat's hull.





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Old 07-29-2015, 10:23 PM   #13
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It's too bad the SARCA isn't available here .. at WM like the Supreme. Can you accommodate the Supreme on your boat?
The Excel seems a good anchor to really good anchor but still lacks anchor test history. Most anchors that look like it are at least a little weak at 3-1 scope. The SARCA is not. Another thing I like about the SARCA is that does it's business standing up ... not laying on it's side to be effective. Laying on the side seems fine if the anchor actually makes the transition to right side up where all anchors hold well. Most anchors do.

Re the Forfjord it could have an orientation problem as well. As it sets it's flukes are quite far apart and if one fluke digs in well (quite likely) and the other lags behind it's quite likely the Forfjord would wind up like a Kedge. One fluke sticking straight up and one straight down. Obviously holding power would be seriously reduced. It could be prone to do that. The Claw has been reported by several to have on occasion not rotated right side up ... just stayed on it's side. This tendency is not well known re the Claw and may not be known at all re the Forfjord. Some of this is speculation but some is fact.

With a Supreme or Rocna 25lbs should be anchor enough for summer gales. No need for a big heavy hook w a SHHP anchor. You'd need at least a 33lb Claw or about a 60lb Forfjord .. IMO. I have a friend in AK that has a 65lb Forfjord on a Willard much like mine but he rarely anchors out. When I last saw him he was looking for another anchor.

Edit w some pics.
1. A Forfjord w locally done mud fluke extensions.
2. A better looking set of mud flukes. On the drum to the left (in this pic) the nylon rode below the chain is visible on the drum.
3. My friend's Willard w the Forfjord.
4. I really like the way he mounts the anchor on the bow. Very little protruding beyond the boat.

Quit a few of the Forfjords in Craig have the mud extensions so one could conclude that they probably drag in mud. I think the factory where the Forfjord is made offers mud extensions and my #2 pic may be just that.
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Old 07-30-2015, 01:37 AM   #14
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Re Forfjord

I still have mine sitting outside the barn using it as yard art.. which it really isn't all that great looking as yard art.. the reason its not on my boat is it is even worse as a anchor!

In my opinion is is the biggest P.O.S anchor made..
One of these days it is going to the scrap yard..
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Old 07-30-2015, 02:23 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hollywood8118 View Post
Re Forfjord

I still have mine sitting outside the barn using it as yard art.. which it really isn't all that great looking as yard art.. the reason its not on my boat is it is even worse as a anchor!

In my opinion is is the biggest P.O.S anchor made..
One of these days it is going to the scrap yard..
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Yeah, but...

Quote:
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...the Forfjord is on 95% of the commercial trawler over 50 ft and*many pleasure boats over 50 ft in the PNW/Puget Sound.*
So why do so many commercial fishing boats use them then?
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Old 07-30-2015, 02:46 AM   #16
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Yeah, but...



So why do so many commercial fishing boats use them then?
Fish boat operators dont like change..back in the day forfjord anchors were the norm..new better anchors have come along and they still hang on to the old forfjords.. I had a
Bruce that was a vastly superior anchor to the forfjord..and we know what some here think of Bruce's! Pull the heads and pan off a v8 engine block and wrap a chain through it..no doubt it will be a better anchor
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Old 07-30-2015, 02:55 AM   #17
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Fish boat operators dont like change...
Another reason might be cost. I told the owner of a marine store in Prince Rupert all about the new Super High Holding Power anchors these days, and he nodded to a pile of Lewmar Claws in the corner and said, "Yeah, well, I get a lot of repeat customers".

Something tells me if those fishermen were dragging Forfjords in 50 to 60 knot winter storms, they'd have theirs in a field too.

What circumstances led to your opinion?
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Old 07-30-2015, 03:17 AM   #18
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So why do so many commercial fishing boats use them then?
I have wondered the same thing. Here are my best guesses:

-Forfjord anchors fit perfectly in a centerline bow roller that is not cantilevered (no need for a bowsprit). They also stow perfectly in a side hawse pipe (like any other pivoting fluke anchor). Fitting a modern anchor to many of these (plumb stemmed) fish boats would require a fairly major modification.

-Commercial fishermen may be resistant to change. Heck, many of these folks are using boats that are 70 or 80 years old. The Forfjord was developed in the 1950's and was probably the best available at the time. If it aint broke, don't fix it.

-Commercial fishermen (unlike us lubbery cruisers) may be more likely to simply maintain an all night anchor watch or even better, put out to sea if the wind pipes up.

-These anchors (like the bruce) may not scale down well. In other words, the large sizes may work much better than the smaller ones. Most of the Forfjords that I see are well over 100 lbs.

-Lastly, there is another effect of scale that may allow larger vessels to get away with a poorer performing anchor. I am sure a naval architect can cite the exact name of this principle but in a nutshell - the force of a given wind will have a smaller effect on a larger vessel. Consider a tiny toy sailboat on a pond. Even with a deep ballasted bulb keel, the toy sailboat will heel over on its ear in even a gentle breeze. On the other hand, the tall ships of 200 hundred years ago had virtually no keel, all ballast inside the hull and endless tons of spars/rigging high in the air; yet they somehow stood up to storms without capsizing.

Steve
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Old 07-30-2015, 07:52 AM   #19
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Thanks Steve, those are good points, particularly the last one and this one (which I'll look into);

Quote:
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-These anchors (like the bruce) may not scale down well. In other words, the large sizes may work much better than the smaller ones. Most of the Forfjords that I see are well over 100 lbs.
Here's our bow configuration. (The curved pipe & hose in Badger's bow where the storm anchor will go is a chafe guard for the bow line).

The happy path of least resistance would see a storm anchor nestled in under the anchor pulpit with no modifications needed other than a new windlass.
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Old 07-30-2015, 10:36 AM   #20
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Another reason might be cost. I told the owner of a marine store in Prince Rupert all about the new Super High Holding Power anchors these days, and he nodded to a pile of Lewmar Claws in the corner and said, "Yeah, well, I get a lot of repeat customers".

Something tells me if those fishermen were dragging Forfjords in 50 to 60 knot winter storms, they'd have theirs in a field too.

What circumstances led to your opinion?

I think the thing may be great in rock, but I don't try to anchor in rock. In mud it was a very unreliable setter..grass forget about it.. most times it took 2-3 tries.. that is setting with low power..lower than I liked or thought was enough to insure a reliable set.
I have anchored all over the world with danforth, bruce, ultra, rocna, delta, fortress, CQR, .. thousands of times.
I never had 5% of the problem with the above anchors.
If the weight/chain size vs boat is in question it is a 40' Ocean Alexander, 3/8 all chain and a #8 size anchor @ 100lbs.
I swapped to a Delta and I have no issues with it at all.
But again its just from my experience.. just an opinion

HOLLYWOOD
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