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Old 04-01-2014, 11:06 AM   #41
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HopCar wrote
" Rogerh, when your anchor comes up facing the wrong way, doesn't it just flop over when the shank gets on the roller? Mine comes up pointing all kind of ways but once on the roller it turns so that the point is facing the bow and the anchor hangs nicely on the roller just as it should"

I don't see how an anchor attached to chain could do otherwise. If the chain dosn't twist on the bow roller it would have to come up the way it went over. However this "clocking" feature may not work if any line is deployed. Could be a plus feature for all chain.
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Old 04-01-2014, 11:10 AM   #42
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I wonder if all I have to do is turn the anchor chain over 180 degrees on the windlass. I never tried that. Could it be that simple..........
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Old 04-01-2014, 04:47 PM   #43
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I wonder if all I have to do is turn the anchor chain over 180 degrees on the windlass. I never tried that. Could it be that simple..........
Or remove the anchor, rotate it 180 degrees and reattach it.
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Old 04-01-2014, 05:30 PM   #44
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If my current anchor has never failed to set or hold, how can anything be "much better"?
Kind of what my wife said when I told her we had to get a new $1200 anchor because we are going to explore the west coast of Florida next year. She went on to observe that "$1200 can buy us a lot of time in some really nice marinas. "

She's the navigator...

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Old 04-01-2014, 08:12 PM   #45
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Kind of what my wife said when I told her we had to get a new $1200 anchor because we are going to explore the west coast of Florida next year. She went on to observe that "$1200 can buy us a lot of time in some really nice marinas. "

She's the navigator...

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It will buy about a week at South Seas unless a holday is in there, then less.
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Old 04-13-2014, 06:44 AM   #46
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We finally got out and tried the Delta. Worked much better. Set quickly without issues. Sure is nice not to need to set a second anchor every time. The first time we bought the Delta up she came up facing correctly and pulled right in. The second time I had to use my boat hook to get it turned around to pull into the pulpit. Not that big of a deal but sure would be nice to have it facing correctly everytime. The next project is replacing the badly worn wroller in the pulpit and install the Maxwell switching relay so that we can go up or down. Manually lowering (somewhat freefall is a pain) which is what we need to do now. I also need to pull the windlass and replace the backer plate and reseal. Presently 3/4 inch rotted plywood. Any recommendation on a better backer plate? Again, thanks for all the help.
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Old 04-13-2014, 09:50 AM   #47
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Rogerh, glad to hear the anchor worked out well. G10 Fiberglass panels seems to be the go to backer board these days. Just Google it and you'll find lots of sources.
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Old 04-13-2014, 11:04 AM   #48
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The first time we bought the Delta up she came up facing correctly and pulled right in. The second time I had to use my boat hook to get it turned around to pull into the pulpit. Not that big of a deal but sure would be nice to have it facing correctly everytime.
When my Delta comes up backwards, when it hits the roller the weight of the anchor flips it over to the correct position. Then just bring it on it.
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Old 04-13-2014, 11:17 AM   #49
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When my Delta comes up backwards, when it hits the roller the weight of the anchor flips it over to the correct position. Then just bring it on it.
That's what my claw anchor does as well.
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Old 04-13-2014, 12:47 PM   #50
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Don, I now understand why your anchor flips over if needed and ours doesn't. Our anchor comes up through a slot in the bow pulpit and the slot is only wide enough for the flat side of the anchor neck. So as soon as the anchor comes up into the slot it can't turn over. Hmmm, not sure what to do about that.
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Old 04-13-2014, 04:13 PM   #51
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Rogerh, my anchor comes up through a slot in the pulpit as well but I guess my Delta is small enough that it doesn't have a problem flipping into position. The obvious answer for you is a wider slot but that means a wider roller assembly as well. Probably worth the effort. Windline makes some pretty big roller assemblies.

https://windline.com/index.php?route...&product_id=78
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Old 04-16-2014, 08:04 AM   #52
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Hopcar you suggested using G10 for the backing plate for the windlass. The present rotted backer is 3/4 inch plywood, 12" x 12". Should I use 3/4 G10 or since it is so strong a smaller thickness?
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Old 04-16-2014, 08:39 AM   #53
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I used 3/4" solid wood, not plywood and painted it.
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Old 04-16-2014, 09:10 AM   #54
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Roger, I've never used G10 but I think it is stiffer than plywood and you could probably use a thinner piece. Maybe someone on this forum with more experience with it will comment.
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Old 04-16-2014, 10:03 AM   #55
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A backing plate can never be too thick as long as the bolts are long enough.
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Old 04-16-2014, 10:09 AM   #56
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Don, I now understand why your anchor flips over if needed and ours doesn't. Our anchor comes up through a slot in the bow pulpit and the slot is only wide enough for the flat side of the anchor neck. So as soon as the anchor comes up into the slot it can't turn over. Hmmm, not sure what to do about that.
Do you have any sort of swivel?

If not, you can usually spin it simply by twisting a little the chain twixt windlass and roller.

Or you can go deluxe:

Ultra Flip Swivel | Quickline USA
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Old 04-16-2014, 10:23 AM   #57
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The swivel could be the difference. I have a swivel, and as soon as the anchor touches the roller it starts to flip before coming into the slot. My slot would also be too narrow for it to flip after the shank is in very far.
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Old 04-16-2014, 10:47 AM   #58
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Interesting comments about not powering against the windlass to pop the anchor out of the bottom.

I always tie off to our sampson post when I anchor to take the strain off of the windlass.

Upon retrieval I power forward with the engines until we are right over the anchor, picking up the almost slack rode with the windlass as we go. Then I pull hard with the windlass until the rode is tight. If the anchor doesn't come loose I power forward until it does. With such a short scope (we usually anchor in <20 feet of water) there doesn't seem to be much strain on the windlass. It would be a pain to wrap the the chain around the post at that point as the post is BEHIND the windlass. I'd have to slack the chain.

Plus my post is really shiny....I wouldn't want to scratch it it. :-)
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Old 04-19-2014, 08:10 AM   #59
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It would be a pain to wrap the the chain around the post at that point as the post is BEHIND the windlass. I'd have to slack the chain.

Simply engage the chain stopper , it should be happy to take the weight of the boat.

GalleyMaid Product 5

www.galleymaid.com/deck.htm‎
A chain stopper must be installed on every installation using chain. If chain is not used a suitable cleat or Sampson post must be installed to secure the anchor ...
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Old 04-19-2014, 08:35 AM   #60
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Interesting comments about not powering against the windlass to pop the anchor out of the bottom.

I always tie off to our sampson post when I anchor to take the strain off of the windlass.

Upon retrieval I power forward with the engines until we are right over the anchor, picking up the almost slack rode with the windlass as we go. Then I pull hard with the windlass until the rode is tight. If the anchor doesn't come loose I power forward until it does. With such a short scope (we usually anchor in <20 feet of water) there doesn't seem to be much strain on the windlass. It would be a pain to wrap the the chain around the post at that point as the post is BEHIND the windlass. I'd have to slack the chain.

Plus my post is really shiny....I wouldn't want to scratch it it. :-)
Agree a chainstopper is best practice. Or put a snubber on there, can be as simple as a line attached with a rolling hitch. If anything, the shallower the more stress on the system. Be nice to your windlass and it will be nicer to you. Your described technique is decreasing its useful lifespan.
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