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Old 08-23-2016, 08:48 PM   #21
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You've got to be kidding 78. One inch thick?
I have a 35lb Dan that's heavy construction (IMO) w a 3/4" thick shank. It's probably mild steel though as the shank is obviously cut out of steel plate. But it could be high carbon ... I don't know. I could test it but have other priorities. Unlike the high performance Danforth brand anchors this one is/was made by a marine salvage co. and has a low aspect ratio.

But re your specific anchor I've not seen one like that. Don't recognize that tag line D ring and see no other distinctive features. One distinctive feature you should eliminate is the bent stock. And in the process the flukes should be aligned by the same bending. Danforth anchors need to be straight ... from what I hear. I've never used a bent one because of that. And using it you may have better luck setting it light.

If I pull it off here are some pics of my HP 22lb Danforth and my regular high end Danforth. Look at the shank length and width. Notice the bent flanges only on one side of the cheaper 18lb anchor flukes. The best Dan anchor has forged fluke flanges on both sides. The shank is longer, stronger and thinner. That clearly be seen in the pics. But these are the best Dans made. The cheaper ones are not of much value as anchors so I hear and read but these high performance Dans are quite good .. if all goes well.

Did'nt go well. I'll retake pics w proper camera and i-mac.
Went fine w proper camera and computer.
Notice strong serious shank stop in pics 1,3 and 5. See in pics 3,4,5 and six the wide and rugged shank end at the stock. The forged fluke inbd edges are much more knife like than the bent over plate in the cheap anchor. This "cheap" anchor is the best compared to all other Danforth anchors that I know of. But the best Dan can be found as in pics #1,2,3,5,7 and 10.

This of course excludes the Fortress line.
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Old 08-23-2016, 08:55 PM   #22
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No, not kidding. Its one inch thick by about one and half inches. Weight on my home scale about 40#. Interestingly, there is another identical anchor on another CHB on my dock, same anchor. I wanted to replace the hardware between chain and anchor a while back and had to buy an oversized shackle to fit over that humongous shank. With this anchor I got today I can dispense with it and go with a normal size shackle.
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Old 08-24-2016, 06:18 AM   #23
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"Murphy says you probably won't rig it when you will need it."

Rigged properly it is set to go 100% of the time with no effort.

Lower the anchor it gets pulled off by the anchor.

On deck unlowered it is still useful as a lead line.
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Old 08-24-2016, 11:53 PM   #24
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Eric, the 20-H I got yesterday is exactly like yours, even has the little white rubber ends. I am keeping the "monsta" for a spare storm anchor. It has the same fluke style as the 20H with the welded flange instead of the bends. I note also there is two other boats on C dock with that same monsta anchor. I think the 20-H will work out well.
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Old 08-25-2016, 06:00 AM   #25
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The H series is probably the best series to chose.20H 35H 60H 90H

The S is fine for lunch.

IMO
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Old 08-25-2016, 07:52 AM   #26
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FF,
The better Dan in my pics is an "H" series?
And the bent flange guy an "S"?
Sounds like you know your Dans.
What else can you tell ....?
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Old 08-25-2016, 07:54 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 78puget-trawler View Post
My poor Lofrans was getting hot and working its arse off tying to get that anchor up.
Poor Lofrans indeed! I think it is poor practice to break out the anchor that way and it said so right in the manual for the Lofrans I bought for my last boat.

I use Mantus anchors which I love but which are the very dickens to break out. (If an anchor is going to have a flaw, that should be the one.) I keep a chain hook on a short line handy. SOP is to pull the anchor to straight up and down, put this line on, and back off the chain a few inches. In calmer conditions and open anchorages, I often do this before breakfast. I then break the anchor out under power. With the Mantus, I usually see the bow go down a few inches and then bob back up when the anchor breaks out. Bump the chain in a few inches, remove the chain hook, and retrieve. Doing it this way every time saves strain on the windlass and keeps it a smooth and practiced operation.
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Old 08-25-2016, 08:10 AM   #28
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Poor Lofrans indeed! I think it is poor practice to break out the anchor that way and it said so right in the manual for the Lofrans I bought for my last boat.

I use Mantus anchors which I love but which are the very dickens to break out. (If an anchor is going to have a flaw, that should be the one.) I keep a chain hook on a short line handy. SOP is to pull the anchor to straight up and down, put this line on, and back off the chain a few inches. In calmer conditions and open anchorages, I often do this before breakfast. I then break the anchor out under power. With the Mantus, I usually see the bow go down a few inches and then bob back up when the anchor breaks out. Bump the chain in a few inches, remove the chain hook, and retrieve. Doing it this way every time saves strain on the windlass and keeps it a smooth and practiced operation.
I like that. Seems so simple and I never thought to do that. Thanks.
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Old 08-25-2016, 09:25 AM   #29
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That spot you were anchored in didn't look very protected. I know that was an uncomfortable day. I hate sitting on anchor and bouncing around like that all day. A few hours is my max. I've been there and I have a Danforth. They stick well.

Your new one is better suited for your boat in my opinion.
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Old 08-25-2016, 09:41 AM   #30
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There have been threads (maybe on cruisersforum) on rigging methods and devices that can be used to get a retrieval line to the "heel" of the anchor. I might go back and have a look at those.
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Old 08-25-2016, 11:25 AM   #31
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That spot you were anchored in didn't look very protected. I know that was an uncomfortable day. I hate sitting on anchor and bouncing around like that all day. A few hours is my max. I've been there and I have a Danforth. They stick well.

Your new one is better suited for your boat in my opinion.
Yes it is exposed but having been there many times in the summer, never had any kind of wind blow in like that day, not fun. With my smaller boats I usually set closer to shore where its a little more protected, but with this boat and a nice day, just dropped it where there was lots of room and not too close to other boats. Oh well.
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Old 08-25-2016, 11:27 AM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Long View Post
Poor Lofrans indeed! I think it is poor practice to break out the anchor that way and it said so right in the manual for the Lofrans I bought for my last boat.

I use Mantus anchors which I love but which are the very dickens to break out. (If an anchor is going to have a flaw, that should be the one.) I keep a chain hook on a short line handy. SOP is to pull the anchor to straight up and down, put this line on, and back off the chain a few inches. In calmer conditions and open anchorages, I often do this before breakfast. I then break the anchor out under power. With the Mantus, I usually see the bow go down a few inches and then bob back up when the anchor breaks out. Bump the chain in a few inches, remove the chain hook, and retrieve. Doing it this way every time saves strain on the windlass and keeps it a smooth and practiced operation.
thank you.
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