Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 06-07-2010, 09:19 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
marinetrader's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 301
Choosing the Right Anchor for Your Trawler

Youve just bought that new 44 foot Albin Sundeck trawler and shes everything you wanted in a trawler.* After upgrading some marine electronics, you will be prepared to do some cruising.* You cant wait to drop the hook and savor your time on the water.

But before you charge into it, is the anchor the right one?* It was on the Albin when you bought her so it should be the right one, right?* So what is the best anchor for you new boat?"

I get asked that question a lot, and the answer is that the type of bottom, be it mud, grass, sand, coral or rock, will decide the right selection of anchor, as will the size of your watercraft. Some anchoring spots may also call for more than one anchor.

Wind conditions will also be involved in how good an anchor holds; each time the wind speed doubles, the force on the boat and her anchor will increase by four times.

Sizing an anchor for your boat reinforces, the "bigger is better" concept; you really cannot have too much anchor. If your diesel engine fails and you are drifting toward an open inlet, having a suitably sized anchor ready could save you and your boat.* However anchor selection also has some practical issues involved; raising an anchor by hand with no electric windlass would be strenuous and consequently requires light and effective ground tackle.

Anchors must provide resistance in the sea bed to work properly. And the anchor's ability to work is totally dependent on its capability to penetrate the sea floor.* The selection of an proper bottom for anchoring is a great deal more of a critical factor than the style of the anchor.* You must take the anticipated bottom conditions into account when choosing your anchor.

Aboard my trawler the Patricia Ann, I use a 35 lb. Lewmar CQR.* It routinely holds in sand and mud bottoms in our cruising region without pulling free.* And it sets quite easily.

Here is a breakdown of likely options based on sea beds you may encounter:

Sand: Finegrained sand is easy for anchors to penetrate and offers dependably good holding power with predictable results.* Fluke anchors offer the best results in sand.

Mud: Mud has low shear strength, and requires an anchor design with a broad shank. This lets the anchor to go in deeply to where the mud has greater sheer strength. Mud bottoms are often only a thin layer of mud over clay, so anchors that can penetrate through the mud to the underlying material will hold better.* Hinged plow anchors and CQR anchors work better in this setting.

Rock and Coral: Holding power is most reliant on where you choose to drop the hook. Plow type anchors, with high structural strength to support the high point loads, normally work the best in rock or coral.* These anchors include the Claw, CQR, and Delta

Shale, clay, and grassy bottoms: These bottoms are the most difficult to address; the weight of the anchor will be the primary factor in gaining penetration and holding ability.* CQR and Delta anchors are found to be good due to their capability for penetrating vegetation. These conditions, however, have a high failure rate from anchors catching on roots or dragging on the surface, rather than grabbing something solid.

Here is a breakdown of the 5 types of anchors.* Price comparisons are based upon outfitting a 40 foot trawler.

1 - Fluke Anchors
Pros: Acceptable holding ability in sand.* Can be had in light weight aluminum.* Low priced.IHolds good in sand. Can be bought in light weight aluminum alloy.* Inexpensive.
Cons: Limited or no holding in rock, mud, grass, or clay bottoms.
Brands:* Fortress, Danforth, Guardian
Costs:* $109.00 for 40 ft boat

2 - Claw Anchors
Pros: Inexpensive. Sets rapidly and dependably in most sea beds and resets well. Highstrength onepiece design. Roll stabilized.
Cons: Difficult to stow without rollers or chocks. Limited holding power in mud or soft sand.
Brands:* Lewmar Claw, Manson Claw
Costs:* $109.00 for a 40 ft. boat

3 - NonHinged Plow Anchors
Pros: Very strong, made from heat-treated steel.* Works good in sand.
Cons: May have problems setting in mud, rock, grass or clay bottoms.* Pricey
Brands:* Delta, Anchorlift
Costs:* $278.00 for a 40 ft. boat

4 - NonHinged Scoop Anchors
Pros: Roll bar for easy resets. Strong high tensile steel construction.* Selflaunches from most bow rollers.* Good holding in sand and mud.* Sets easily.
Cons: More expensive
Brands:* Rocna, Manson
Costs:* $599.00 for a 40 ft. boat

5 - Hinged Plow Anchors
Pros: Widely used.* Heavy construction.. Stows simply on anchor rollers, and sets well in most sea beds. *** Cons: Requires large size for given boat size. Very expensive.
Brands:* CQR, Manson
Costs:* $749.00 for a 40 ft. boat
__________________
Advertisement

marinetrader is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2010, 10:04 AM   #2
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,712
RE: Choosing the Right Anchor for Your Trawler

Sounds like you copied this out of a book.Furthermore I don't respond to commercials.


Eric Henning
__________________

Nomad Willy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2010, 12:13 PM   #3
Veteran Member
 
wingspar's Avatar
 
City: Blaine
Vessel Name: White Star
Vessel Model: Canoe Cove
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 79
RE: Choosing the Right Anchor for Your Trawler

I use to play that game. Which anchor for which bottom. I've tried them all from the Danford, Bruce, CQR and others over many years. I've also dragged all of these or they wouldn't set. Just wanted an anchor that would set every time and any conditions up here in the Pacific Northwest. Sorry, no coral.*

Then about*eight years ago I saw a funny looking anchor on a boat that I've never seen before. Talked to the owner and he said it was a "Super Max"and it worked very well for him.* I did order it out and what a difference. First set every time and no dragging.

And when I bought a new boat here six months ago my first purchase was a SuperMax anchor. Yes, it's expensive but a good nights sleep when the wind pipes up...... Priceless.

Not a commercial for me, Just a very satisfied owner.
wingspar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2010, 04:46 PM   #4
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,712
RE: Choosing the Right Anchor for Your Trawler

I can respond to you David. I've seen many pics and some text on the Super Max but I've never given it serious consideration because I thought a rocky bottom would give it lots of trouble. I've been convinced it wouldn't work at all in rocks but I think I've misjudged how many rocky bottoms we have. Perhaps it's very few so a Super Max or Fortress would make lots of sense for a primary anchor but then you'd still need to cary a rock anchor. I've been seriously shopping lately. I decided at one point a Fortress and any one of several that looked like they'd do well on rocky bottoms would be fine but then Marin would say why buy a second anchor when one will do fine * * *.. and he'd have a point. My XYZ works really well in mud and the Fortress does too so I decided to get a Manson Supreme (small 15lbs) and see how it works in everything. I'll have the XYZ as back up in mud and will be able to use my proven Danforth w the Manson in strong winds if the Manson turns out to be weaker than expected. Been there done that * * ..the XYZ was not nearly as good as it looked and that could happen to me again. Then if the Manson Supreme performs supremely (PI) I'll get a bigger one next year and a winch. For me it was a hard decision between the Rocna, SARCA and the Manson Supreme. Chose the Manson mostly over details.

Eric Henning
Nomad Willy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2010, 06:00 PM   #5
Veteran Member
 
wingspar's Avatar
 
City: Blaine
Vessel Name: White Star
Vessel Model: Canoe Cove
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 79
Choosing the Right Anchor for Your Trawler

Eric, so far I have had good luck with a rock bottom with my Super Max. Not that there is alot of areas here where i boat that would be considered rocky.

The one that kind of stands out to me was many years ago was traveling up to Princess Louisa. We stayed the night in if I remember correctly was Green bay before making the final push. At the time I was using a large Danforth and a CQR on all chain. Dropping the Danforth in about 15 feet of water resulted on quite alot of underwater noise as you could hear the chain draging on the rocks and the flukes bouncing up and down. It never did set and I switch to the CQR which took third tries before it would set.

A few years later with the Super Max in the same place I dropped it and it set almost immediatly. Could be just lucky. I don't know.

As we anchor out nearly 95% of the time I kept a separate log book of bays and coves, etc that we have been. Some we had to leave because I could never get the anchor to set. With the Max I have been able to go back into these areas and that darn anchor has never had a problem getting a good set. I've since thrown out my anchor log book years ago.

The one bad thing about it if you can call it that is when anchoring in a muddy bottom and staying there two or three day when it's time to leave the Max can be a problem to retrive as it seems to have headed to China and takes me five to ten minutes with the anchor chain vertical to work it free.

I also remember a time when anchored off of Portland Island with three other boats. During the late afternoon the winds picked up. They all dragged and left. i didn't and stayed

-- Edited by wingspar on Monday 7th of June 2010 06:02:31 PM
wingspar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2010, 07:46 PM   #6
TF Site Team
 
Peter B's Avatar
 
City: Brisbane
Country: Australia
Vessel Name: Lotus
Vessel Model: Clipper (CHB) 34 Sedan/Europa style
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 6,669
Send a message via Skype™ to Peter B
RE: Choosing the Right Anchor for Your Trawler

Hi Eric and wingspar. That Supemax does look a very business-like arrangement, and I can see why it would be a good all-rounder. Personally I am a fan of the roll-bar types, and have great experience, and therefore faith in the Super Sarca, rather like wingspar has with his Supermax. I'm interested to see you went for a Manson Supreme in the end, Eric, as this is one roll-bar type I have no personal experience with, and know of only one other who has, and so far it has been favourable. As it is sort of a blend of the features of the Sarca and Rocna, it could well turn out great - or sometimes compromises between two types end up not quite as good. I will follow your experience with it with interest. It apparently satisfied Lloyds as a high power holding anchor, so that speaks well of it. Please keep us posted. As you say, the 15 pounder might be a bit light for your craft, but only time will tell.
Peter B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2010, 05:54 AM   #7
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,527
RE: Choosing the Right Anchor for Your Trawler

Price wise most 60lb anchors are not out of line.,will work for most boats to 50 ft.

A bunch are needed as there is no "best" for every bottom , and if you cruise a lot , you WILL loose a set at times.

The best anchoring investment is simply a big windlass , hydraulic is by far the best , but a bit expen$ive to scrap a working electric unit and install a proper system.

Used pump, accumulator and the rest can be found over time , and the setup and hoses installed till the right time , when the smoke comes out of the electric unit.
FF is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2010, 08:51 AM   #8
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,712
RE: Choosing the Right Anchor for Your Trawler

FF,Anywhere else they'd make fun of me w a 60lb anchor on my bow, and it would be on the bow as I wouldn't be inclined to pack it around. However, If/when I get a winch a 35lb anchor would be equivalent to your 60 on my boat and thats probably what I'd have.
I've decided just a week ago that probably almost all the smoking electric winches go south from abuse. Especially the all chain rode systems. I'll bet most all boaters w all chain will pull their boat up to the anchor w the winch and then pull it out w the winch if it's not stuck good and by that time the winch would be hot and ripe for failure from a bit more abuse. I'll bet if I pull the rope rode up by hand till directly over the anchor, tie it off and pull the anchor out w the boats engine then pull the rope rode straight up w the electric winch the winch should last till corrosion gets it. If your'e in the wheelhouse pulling anchor you can't see the scope of the rode and would only know when the boat was directly over the anchor when the winch slows way down from excessive load. Not good. Almost all the fishermen here have hydraulic winches but they don't have 60lb anchors * * .. they have 100lb anchors and brutus chain. There will always be those that feel that mass is golden. My dad was one. He had a 36' lobster boat yacht built in Maine w an Airex foam core hull and still managed to load the boat up w so much weight it never made over 9 knots w a robust 6-71. A lot like your boat FF but much smaller. Anyway I highly suspect/think the electric windlass on pleasure boats have a bad rap from misuse. As for needing a sack full of anchors for every bottom type it's possible or close to being false because of the newer design anchors. I wonder if Marin or Peter B has a story about dragging in mud?


Eric Henning
Nomad Willy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2010, 06:22 PM   #9
TF Site Team
 
Peter B's Avatar
 
City: Brisbane
Country: Australia
Vessel Name: Lotus
Vessel Model: Clipper (CHB) 34 Sedan/Europa style
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 6,669
Send a message via Skype™ to Peter B
RE: Choosing the Right Anchor for Your Trawler

I've never dragged in mud Eric, and I agree entirely with you re the electric winches. They last virtually forever if not abused. Mine is the original on the boat I think, (a lusty Muir vertical action), now 35 yrs old - to my knowledge no major overhaul ever needed. I up mine from the helm position, but I have fitted a simple chain counter, so I know where it is length-wise, and I usually get someone to stand out front and indicate the direction of the chain, so I can drive up and over it, and then I basically use the trip slot mechanism in the Sarca shank to free it nearly every time, so I never have to strain the winch ripping it out of the bottom. I think the Manson Supreme has such a slot. The scarey stories put out by other makes re this causing the anchor to let go at awkward times has never, repeat never, occurred in now 7 yrs of solid use on all types of bottoms. It re-sets itself so quickly anyway, it is almost irrelevant as a consideration. Just loves mud, as your Manson will, but yes, do yourself a favour and get a vertical acting (adequately big) winch, (especially as the Manson/Rocnas don't shed the bottom as well as the Sarca because of the concave fluke - the similarity between those two), and enjoy anchoring, as well as being anchored, for the first time in your life - you will never miss pulling it up by hand - believe me, I did that all the years we had a yacht, and that was only using a 12 lb Danforth.
Peter B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2010, 09:44 PM   #10
Veteran Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 73
Choosing the Right Anchor for Your Trawler

Original Bruce anchor. Took me one year to find a real Bruce in the weight I wanted. I have a lighter Bruce for the stern. So. California has a variety of bottoms. Mostly mucky mud/sand mix to sand, Or mud with eel grass. Have not pulled out yet. Chain 1-1/2 times the length of my boat with 3 strand nylon rode. Three to one scope for day anchor 5 to one up to 7 to one for overnighters.

-- Edited by jclays on Tuesday 8th of June 2010 09:45:57 PM
jclays is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2010, 05:36 AM   #11
Guru
 
Tom.B's Avatar
 
City: Cary, NC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Skinny Dippin'
Vessel Model: Navigator 4200 Classic
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 5,153
RE: Choosing the Right Anchor for Your Trawler

It sure seems like there is no right answer about anchors. In my short tenure as a boater, I've yet to see ANY consistency of opinions about anchors. It seems like 5 people have 6 different answers and everyone think THEY have the perfect solution.

We've been thinking about replacing our 35# CQR for our 19,000# trawler used in the mostly muddy bottom of the Neuse. So, that being said, I am going to stop worrying about it, keep what I have now, and goto a strip club with the money I save
Tom.B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2010, 08:01 AM   #12
Guru
 
koliver's Avatar
 
City: Saltspring Island
Country: BC, canada
Vessel Name: Retreat
Vessel Model: C&L 44
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 2,170
RE: Choosing the Right Anchor for Your Trawler

The fact that most opinions are to validate the choice of anchor used by the person with the opinion suggests there is really no wrong answer for an anchor choice, provided you acquaint yourself with the limitations of your choice and are careful in situations that will test those limitations.

Attach plenty of chain, use an anchor that is heavy enough for the boat, use care when deploying it, use adequate scope, and in most conditions, your present choice will give good service.

If buying new, walk the docks in your area and buy what the majority of people with your size of boat are using. Better yet, talk to those people and ask why they have the particular choice. Their reasons will be many and varied, but each will have a reason and all will be valid.
koliver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2010, 08:58 AM   #13
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,712
RE: Choosing the Right Anchor for Your Trawler

Jim, Keith and Tom,Yes, Yes, and Yes. I'd like to see much more text here from guys that use anchors that do poorly on anchor tests to balance the bias in the anchor tests. A lot of it is'nt really bias * * *.. just plain incompetence. Practical Sailor and SARCA just dragged the anchors up the beach * *.. as in 10000-1 scope * *.. not the real world. And many of the tests are performed on basically dry beaches and I'm sure even sand acts differently above the water than below. The anchor test that 1st suckered me in only tested in mud. The test that seems to be the best to me now is so biased it has a full page blurb (basically an add) at the bottom by the Rocna guy praising his product. In this test the Bruce had max holding power is 1/20th as much as 7 other anchors in the line up. Makes it look to me like Rocna picked the most popular anchor out there on boats and arranged a "test" to make it look so bad 50% of the Bruce users would rush down (or up) and buy a Rocna. And I wonder why the Super Max wasn't presented. Chris and I went to Alaska in 03 w a Bruce (or a copy) and it worked well for us (but not perfect) and Jim (jclays) has good performance w his Bruce. Frankly, over the years I've had better luck w the Danforth than any other anchor. I may yet use my Manson Supreme as a rock anchor and get a Fortress as my primary. It's interesting that Manson makes all the basic anchor types and says individually that they are all the best. I'd like to hear more from you guys using other not so popular anchors especially if they work well for you. Seems to me Penta uses a Northill and I know the Delta is quite popular and I've heard good reports from users.


Eric Henning
Nomad Willy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2010, 11:08 AM   #14
Guru
 
Phil Fill's Avatar
 
City: Everett Wa
Country: US
Vessel Name: Eagle
Vessel Model: Roughwater 58 pilot house
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,919
RE: Choosing the Right Anchor for Your Trawler

Its logically a heavier anchor would do better than a light one as bigger the boat the heavier the anchor recommended.* As for mud/sand it would seem logical that anchors with large surface flukes would be best.* However, in grass/sea weed the large fluke might become fouled, so an anchor with a smaller surface area or a plow type would be better.* In rock/stone/coral *a plow which less surface area to dig in would be better. So instead of one anchor a boat should have several depending on the bottom, large fluke, medium fluke and a plow/claw? **It seems a hinged shank would be better than a straight shank as a boats swings at anchor.* The Danforth is the most copied in the large surface fluke, QCR is the most/some what copied in the plow, and the Bruce in the claw.* *


*
I find it odd/strange that the navy type anchors used by the navy/ships and/or commercial trawler/tug are not compared in the test?** Hmmmmm!* **As for an anchor I was so confused with the pleasure anchors tests, that I walked the commercial docks to see what anchors they had, which were the navy type and very few plow or claw.* The most popular in the 50 to 100 ft commercial trawler/tugs in the PNW is the Forjord a navy type anchor.* I am not saying its the best but if the commercials depend on the Forjord that itself speaks well for the navy type anchors?*


*
So why re the navy types anchors not included in the tests?
* .* **********
Phil Fill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2010, 03:28 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
Bendit's Avatar
 
City: Auckland
Country: New Zealand
Vessel Name: Pioneer
Vessel Model: Westcoaster 53 converted to pleasure
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 283
RE: Choosing the Right Anchor for Your Trawler

Always had plows - CQR or Manson.
Then the previous boat (Riviera 36) came with a Delta (15kg) and I couldn't believe how good it was. It always set instantly and we never dragged. Even fishing in deep water (100+ft) and 1.5 to 1 scope, it always held on.

When we launched Pioneer, I put a Delta 25kg up front and in six years we have dragged only once in very soft mud and too little scope. I like the very positive set, which is quite unlike my experience with the plows. They never gave me a lot of confidence.

We also have a Plastimo 60lb plow as a back up, but I've never used it.
Bendit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2010, 06:10 PM   #16
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,712
RE: Choosing the Right Anchor for Your Trawler

Phil,Popular theory is that they weigh too much for the holding power delivered. I have a 27lb Forfjord. Tried to use it once and it wouldn't set. I think it was a hard bottom. My Danforth set * *..same spot. It's a decoration on my new garage now. Most of the fishing boats here in SE have the Forfjord on their bows. It was a bit heavy for me to hand pull too. If National Fisherman magazine did an anchor test I'm sure the Navy types would be well represented. Youv'e given yet another vote for multiple anchors for various bottom types.
Jeff,
Thanks for the input. I suspected the Delta was a good anchor. I had doubts about their short scope performance though, however I had doubts about that w my Danforth too and it delivered a very short scope set. However setting and holding on in a blow are quite different. Everybody poo poos the copy anchors but I think that some could possibly be even better than the original. Nothing is perfect * *.. everything can be improved upon.
Nomad Willy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-09-2010, 08:01 PM   #17
TF Site Team
 
Peter B's Avatar
 
City: Brisbane
Country: Australia
Vessel Name: Lotus
Vessel Model: Clipper (CHB) 34 Sedan/Europa style
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 6,669
Send a message via Skype™ to Peter B
RE: Choosing the Right Anchor for Your Trawler

Quote:
koliver wrote:

The fact that most opinions are to validate the choice of anchor used by the person with the opinion suggests there is really no wrong answer for an anchor choice, provided you acquaint yourself with the limitations of your choice and are careful in situations that will test those limitations.

Attach plenty of chain, use an anchor that is heavy enough for the boat, use care when deploying it, use adequate scope, and in most conditions, your present choice will give good service.

If buying new, walk the docks in your area and buy what the majority of people with your size of boat are using. Better yet, talk to those people and ask why they have the particular choice. Their reasons will be many and varied, but each will have a reason and all will be valid.
I think Koliver summed it up well.* The only thing I might differ on is the wisdom of the last para - ie walking the docks and asking why people have what they have.* In my area that would be ploughs - yet I now regard them as inferior - especially because the hinged shank lets them merely bounce across the bottom, (Phil).* The*simple fact is*that there is room for improvement in all gear, but most work most of the time, as Koliver pointed out.* However,*it's often only when circumstances force one to change what one uses, because of the random chance of buying a boat with a different set-up like Bendit mentioned, or getting so mad when a plough would*not set in a certain weedy place, as in my case, where I bought a Sarca, that one actully gets the chance to test a different bit of gear from what you are used to, and then finds it better or worse than the one you can, from experience, compare it with.* That is often when the epiphany occurs, and one realises, hey, there are better ones out there.....the point being, they will only be able to demonstrate their superiority when put to a real test over time in real conditions, something the average boater never gets to do, so they put up with what they've got.

*
Peter B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-2010, 01:42 AM   #18
Guru
 
Tidahapah's Avatar
 
City: Mooloolaba
Country: Australia
Vessel Name: Tidahapah
Vessel Model: Bert Ellis Timber motor cruiser
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,779
Choosing the Right Anchor for Your Trawler

The old anchor debate,
I have often looked at some of the new style anchors and thunk about purchasing one , most likely a roll bar model.
But after 15 years with the same 75 lb plough ( not a recognised brand, but locally made) I have never draged .
I think this is more to judicious setting and forethought.
I set and drop back pretty hard and have plenty of scope with my 1/2" chain.
If I know it is going to blow pretty hard ie over 30 knots then I deploy a second plough ahead of the main anchor attached to it with 10 mts ( 30 ft) of chain and set it in.

Your anchor is the best insurance you will ever buy so one shouldn't scrimp but be thorough in your anchoring procedure.

The other things are to have a good strong sampson post and a good long strong stretchy strop.( in big winds I actually have been known to attach 2 strops)

Benn

-- Edited by Tidahapah on Thursday 10th of June 2010 01:45:25 AM
Tidahapah is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-2010, 04:37 AM   #19
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,527
RE: Choosing the Right Anchor for Your Trawler

It seems like 5 people have 6 different answers and everyone think THEY have the perfect solution.

Same with Gas vs Diesel

Twin vs single ,

These are best considered as religions , no rational thought wanted,
FF is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-2010, 06:00 AM   #20
TF Site Team
 
Peter B's Avatar
 
City: Brisbane
Country: Australia
Vessel Name: Lotus
Vessel Model: Clipper (CHB) 34 Sedan/Europa style
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 6,669
Send a message via Skype™ to Peter B
RE: Choosing the Right Anchor for Your Trawler

Maybe - maybe not. But remember, it's all meant to be fun. But dragging anchor on a dark, wet and windy night is not fun. So maybe why these discussions spark so much interest is that folk like to share good news, and it's healthy to stimulate people to think outside the square, rather than just sheep-like, follow what others are doing, just because that's what they/others have always done. It's been an interesting discussion.
__________________

Peter B is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Choosing Dingy Davits for Your Trawler marinetrader Dinghys and Smaller Boats 18 02-27-2017 11:12 AM
Tips on Choosing the Best Battery for Your Trawler marinetrader Power Systems 14 05-26-2010 04:23 AM
Choosing a Marine Varnish marinetrader General Maintenance 10 11-26-2009 09:38 PM
Choosing an anchor (longish) Marin General Discussion 5 05-01-2009 08:41 AM
Choosing an Autopilot??? DonW Electrical and Electronics & Navigation 7 05-30-2008 11:36 PM




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:25 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012