Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 06-10-2010, 09:30 AM   #21
Veteran Member
 
wingspar's Avatar
 
City: Blaine
Vessel Name: White Star
Vessel Model: Canoe Cove
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 79
RE: Choosing the Right Anchor for Your Trawler

"no rational thought wanted"

Gee, on another topic I'm a "rich A-hole" and in this one I'm not rational because I've found an anchor that has worked in this area for me very well after going through a plethora of other makes.

Dave
__________________
Advertisement

wingspar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-2010, 09:43 AM   #22
Guru
 
Phil Fill's Avatar
 
City: Everett Wa
Country: US
Vessel Name: Eagle
Vessel Model: Roughwater 58 pilot house
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,919
RE: Choosing the Right Anchor for Your Trawler

The anchor that was on the bow and connected was a QCR as the previous owner anchored mostly in California/Mexico.* We tried the QCR and it would not set hold is sand/rock, it just ploughed.* The spares was a Danforth that we changed to and it held.** However, looking at pleasure and commercial not many big boats had Danforths and most of the information/opinions was not positive.* So I walked the pleasure and the commercial docks.* 50% of the pleasure over 50 ft and 90+% of the commercial had Forfjords, so I bought one.* We have not anchored out much just in 30 to 50 ft of protected waters and the Forfjord did set and hold with a chain.* Even then we slept in the pilot house and I did not sleep that well, so we tie to a dock when ever possible.* So the Forfjord is the main/connected anchor, Danforth as back up and then CQR.*


*
When anchoring on opening day in Seattle along the parade route they bow and stern tie.* We have a smaller Danforth for the stern but no windless, so to pull I had to use the boom.* If we do decide to cruise I will probable install a Winch on the stern deck as many larger boats have them as they tie the stern to the shore in some areas.* We also have a sea anchor that came with the boat, that nobody ever discusses/mentions?** We have never used it but its there just in case, just like the anchors and ground tackle.* The anchor bridle I mostly use to pull the run about, so at least that gets used a couple of times per year.* Hopefully by the time we start cruising I will have it figured out?
__________________

Phil Fill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-2010, 09:51 AM   #23
Veteran Member
 
wingspar's Avatar
 
City: Blaine
Vessel Name: White Star
Vessel Model: Canoe Cove
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 79
RE: Choosing the Right Anchor for Your Trawler

Phil, when I had my CQR I sold it to another boat in my marina after it dragged in Oak Harbor after the wind came up to about 20 MPH and I ended up being less then 10 feet from the public dock.

Dave
wingspar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-2010, 04:14 PM   #24
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,707
Choosing the Right Anchor for Your Trawler

Hey Wingspar,Are you an aviator? Re: Wingspar? Or is that sail boat lore.
I don't know if I should get between you guys but I see where you got the "no rational thought wanted". I don't know what went on w the other thread but here I don't think his post carries any negative heat. Actually I agree w FF. On those subjects usually no one seems to learn anything. We just present our own religion and get mad when no one buys it. He's just saying we all have our own ideas and despite being bombarded by facts and fairly obvious sage experience we still cling dead fast to our time honored old ideas, equipment and practices. I think FFs just trying to present the irony of it all. And I am trying to raise the widest range of anchors and experience this site can offer. With your Super Max you've made an important contribution. Thanks.


Eric


-- Edited by nomadwilly on Thursday 10th of June 2010 04:21:12 PM
Nomad Willy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-2010, 08:30 PM   #25
Scraping Paint
 
City: -
Country: -
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,748
Choosing the Right Anchor for Your Trawler

Quote:
nomadwilly wrote:

*
. I'll bet most all boaters w all chain will pull their boat up to the anchor w the winch and then pull it out w the winch if it's not stuck good and by that time the winch would be hot and ripe for failure from a bit more abuse.
Eric---* There's nothing wrong with the first part of your statement if it's done in a way I consider sensible.* We use our electric windlass (Lofrans Tigres) to "pull" the boat up to the set anchor, but we don't actually use the windlass to do the pulling.* We use the weight of the all-chain rode.* I take in most of*the slack with the windless and then stop and*wait while the weight of the chain still in the water sags down and*pulls the boat forward.* Then as I see the amount of slack increasing I pull it in with the windlass again, and then wait again as the remaining chain continues to pull the boat forward.* Eventually we end up over the anchor with all the slack out of the chain.**

There is no strain put on the windlass while doing this, and is one reason I consider it important to operate a windlass at the windlass as opposed to using a remote control from the wheelhouse or flying bridge where you can't see what the chain is doing.* (I realize single-handing can pose different priorities.)

This works for no or hardly-any wind conditions.* If the wind is blowing the pull-wait-pull method won't work, so my wife uses one or both engines and shifters to ease the boat forward while I take up the slack with the windlass.* Again, no strain put on the windlass itself.

The second part of your statement--- *the bit about using the windlass to break out the anchor from the bottom--- *I agree that it's not such a great idea.* If the boat's movement against the vertical,*tight chain doesn't easily*break out the anchor we move on to Plan B, which always works (unless the anchor is fouled or extremely well dug-in, in which case we'd use the trip line to back it out).

We have a short, heavy (3/4") line made up with a chain hook spliced into one end.* The chain hook is attached to the rode*a couple of feet below*the bow roller (an easy reach on our boat, maybe not on others), and the bitter end run back through the starboard bow hawse and secured to one of the heavily backed bow cleats on the foredeck.* Then the windlass is backed off so the cleated line is holding all the weight of the chain--- no weight is on the bow pulpit or windlass.

We then break out the anchor using the boat's power in reverse and the cleated*line.* Once the anchor is free the "break out" line is removed and the windlass is*used to haul up the rest of the rode and the anchor.

We also use this line to set the anchor against.* We never set against the windlass or the pulpit, always to one of the big deck cleats.

In addition to the overheating problem you describe, the other issue to consider is the stress that*breaking an anchor out can put on the internal components of the windlass.* Some can take it, some can't, and some will until they can't anymore at which point they'll break.* To the folks who say they've been brute-forcing their anchors out of the mud with their windlasses with no problems the only thing I can say in reply is that nothing ever breaks until it breaks.

So I'm with you, Eric.* If we take care of our boats' gear, it will take care of us.

PS-- Regarding the SuperMax, I may have mentioned in a previous discussion that I've read a number of positive comments about this anchor on the T&T list over the*years*from people who have them.

-- Edited by Marin on Thursday 10th of June 2010 08:40:48 PM
Marin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-2010, 09:26 PM   #26
JD
Guru
 
JD's Avatar
 
City: New Bern NC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Stella Di Mare
Vessel Model: Mainship 34t
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 1,702
RE: Choosing the Right Anchor for Your Trawler

Quote:
wingspar wrote:

"no rational thought wanted"

Gee, on another topic I'm a "rich A-hole" and in this one I'm not rational because I've found an anchor that has worked in this area for me very well after going through a plethora of other makes.

Dave
Dave,

Not to worry that's just Fred.* The other seemed to be a young idealist.*

*
JD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-2010, 09:44 PM   #27
Guru
 
Arctic Traveller's Avatar


 
City: Juneau Alaska
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Arctic Traveller
Vessel Model: Defever 49 RPH
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 619
RE: Choosing the Right Anchor for Your Trawler

Quote:
Marin wrote:


There is no strain put on the windlass while doing this, and is one reason I consider it important to operate a windlass at the windlass as opposed to using a remote control from the wheelhouse or flying bridge where you can't see what the chain is doing.* (I realize single-handing can pose different priorities.)
We have the same windlass on the Arctic Traveller, and I always wondered just how much stain I was putting on the windlass while raising the anchor from the pilot house.* Just this year, I installed an amp meter in the pilot house that has the shunt in the windlass circuit.* Now, I just watch the meter, and when it starts to spike I let off the switch.** Letting the weight of the chain pull the boat forward is a good idea, but it only works when there is no wind or current.* Adding the amp meter removes the guess work......................Arctic Traveller* (a satisfied Delta anchor user)
Arctic Traveller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-10-2010, 09:45 PM   #28
Scraping Paint
 
City: -
Country: -
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,748
RE: Choosing the Right Anchor for Your Trawler

Quote:
nomadwilly wrote:


I wonder if Marin or Peter B has a story about dragging in mud?

We dragged a number of times in mud with the Bruce, which is the primary reason we finally elected to get rid of it.* So far we have not dragged in any bottom--- most of which have been mud in one consistency or another--- with the Rocna.

*
Marin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2010, 12:32 AM   #29
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,707
Choosing the Right Anchor for Your Trawler

Arctic,The amp meter is a very excellent idea I would have been proud to have thought of. One must have a good winch (you do) and establish a low enough red line. Perhaps twice what it takes to pull the anchor up after break out.
Marin,
Welcome back. The post I made regarding misuse of the winch was not aimed at you but the general boating public * * ..relative to the bad reputation of electric winches. If I had your boat I'd weigh anchor exactly as you do * * .. including usage of wives.
I bought a Manson Supreme (15lbs) to experiment w this summer. Then I will either get a winch and a larger MS or a Fortress at which time I'll use the MS as a rock anchor. Looks like it's up to it. Choosing between the MS, SARCA and Rocna was difficult.
Comments on each:
SARCA.
Plus- Smaller dia roll bar allowed better penetration and less plowing. Tip is sharper and angled down * *..prolly better setting. Shorter shank and more text indicating higher probability of holding at short scope. Slot providing variable attach rode attach points for experimenting w short scope. Probably the greatest fluke area per lb .
Minus- Availability. In the best anchor test I could find it's max holding power was less than half of many other anchors. They say the slots in the flukes are to help slush off mud but I suspect much holding power is lost through the slots. Dos'nt look as strong as the MS and R.
Rocna.
Plus. Best tip and angle geometry for fastest setting. Extremely high fluke area per lb. Reputation of the highest level. Very available. Moderately priced. Probably better in mud than the MS.*Very high holding power per numerous tests. Best attach point for trip line. Probably very strong. Probably a good rock anchor.
Minus- Long shank and lowest angle geometry for poor holding at 3-1 (or less) scope. Showed much reduced performance in an anchor test at 3-1 scope. No means to adjust rode attach point.
Manson Supreme.
Plus- Reputation of the highest level. Slot for adjusting rode attach point. Lots of text indicating high probability of short scope performance. Shorter shank. Probably very strong. Availability. Probably a good rock anchor. Best price. High fluke area per lb. Looks very strong.
Minus- A bit less fluke area due to slot. Retrieval line attach point not ideal.


All the above is based on what I;ve heard and read plus it's heavily biased to my desire to have excellent short scope performance. I think Marin is right * *.. my fiddling w and experimenting w the XYZ may not be a good idea. The 15lb MS is 2lbs heavier than the XYZ and probably will hold at least as well. In the long run the Super Max or the Fortress lb per lb may out perform everything.


Eric Henning






-- Edited by nomadwilly on Friday 11th of June 2010 07:48:23 AM
Nomad Willy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2010, 04:26 AM   #30
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,518
RE: Choosing the Right Anchor for Your Trawler

"no rational thought wanted"

AS noted , anchoring, single or twin, gas - diesel, ketch -yawl,sloop -cutter are beliefs that require no proof . Where any "proof" is discarded.

Same with Liberals religion ,

100+ years of Marxism , almost 200 millions killed or imprisioned , not a single successful Marxist country and its still the belief of Kolledge profs , the Teachers union and our undoccumented "president".
FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2010, 08:02 AM   #31
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,707
Choosing the Right Anchor for Your Trawler

FF,It is amazing how often emotions and opinions rule. Sometimes (often) we hold up facts to support our notions even when we know they don't hold up to objective scrutiny.
What in the world is "Same with Liberals religion". Please don't reply here. It's the conservatives that have most of the religious agenda. But religion, Marxism and presidents neeeeed to be only on OTDE. You should read Investment Biker by Jim Rogers.


Eric


-- Edited by nomadwilly on Friday 11th of June 2010 08:03:46 AM
Nomad Willy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-11-2010, 09:20 PM   #32
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,707
RE: Choosing the Right Anchor for Your Trawler

I got my new Manson anchor today and I'm very impressed w it. It's bigger than I expected and weighs 17.5lbs instead of 15. Suites me fine as I almost got the 18lb Rocna because it was a bit heavier. The roll bar is larger in dia. than I thought it would be and I'm sure now the roll bar types get much of their holding power from the interference drag between the sides of the roll bar and the fluke. The thing looks seriously strong. I won't be shy about huck'in it out on the rocks. In fact I'm so pleased w it I think I may not need any other anchors. Of course I haven't even got it wet yet.*I have a 5/8" rode and think a 1/2" trip line would be fine but part of me thinks that may be over kill. I want a sacrificial 100' extension on my main rode because it's expensive Brait. At 350' I should prolly wait until I need to cut 75 or so feet off but then I'll need a new anchor too. Think I'll use the trip line and hope for the best.
By the way the sunny weather just quit. Raining hard and blow'in 30 or more inside the bay. It's almost 60 degrees though. I wonder where Tom (sunchaser) is now. He's prolly testing his anchor somewhere. Wish you'd have gone w him Marin.
Here's a picture of a fishing boat in Craig w a big Forfjord on the bow. Most of them carry the Forfjords vertically as in the pic.


Eric
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	all to 12-15-09 538.jpg
Views:	61
Size:	203.6 KB
ID:	2195  
Nomad Willy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2010, 04:23 AM   #33
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,518
RE: Choosing the Right Anchor for Your Trawler

You should read Investment Biker by Jim Rogers.


Read that about 20 years ago.

It simply proves that where there is corrupt and total gov , there is abject poverty.

Cruise on down to Haiti , then visit the Dom Rep, big difference , when private property ownership is permitted!
FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2010, 08:09 AM   #34
TF Site Team
 
Peter B's Avatar
 
City: Brisbane
Country: Australia
Vessel Name: Lotus
Vessel Model: Clipper (CHB) 34 Sedan/Europa style
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 6,669
Send a message via Skype™ to Peter B
RE: Choosing the Right Anchor for Your Trawler

Just as a passing final comment re the anchors of the type like Danforth, Forfjord, Fortress etc. What do they all resemble?....large ship anchors. Why do large ships use them? Because they suit the near-vertical, through the hawse-hole-in-the-bow arrangement for stowing - that's the only stowing method they do suit, and if heavy enough, work reliably and well on virtually any bottom. However, that's the snag. They gotta be heavy, and because of their (heavy means big) size and shape they are absolute dogs to stow neatly, and launch and retrieve....something we do a lot more than ships, and even fishing boats do, especially with a bow fitting/sprit like most of us have on the type of boats most of us have. Otherwise, yeah, we'd all have them I guess.
Peter B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2010, 01:19 PM   #35
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,518
RE: Choosing the Right Anchor for Your Trawler

It doesn't require a 10,000lb navy anchor to be stored in a hawse hole , simple instalation of the hole in the proper spot does it.

The usual hassle is the bulkwards are not deep enough .

Our 90/90 has a watertight bulkhead (offshore boat) so the deck on top of the space was installed a foot lower than the fore deck.

An errant wave drains in seconds , but the location does allow the carry of 35 HT Dabforth or CQR (its a small 32 ft, boat) .

It its really nice to know no anchor cleaning is required , no matter what is brought up.

And its also nice to sit in the space , almost a bow cockpit, and let the boat sail herself.


The added construction time , and lack of owner demand is why this is not as common as it should be.
FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2010, 01:42 PM   #36
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,707
Choosing the Right Anchor for Your Trawler

I'd like to see a picture of that FF. Do you store the rode in your "anchor cockpit" or does it go below in the usual manner? I've seen some sport boats w what I think your'e describing. Perhaps your winch and "rode hole" is aft on the main deck.*Is your boat 32' ?? I assumed all this time it was 40' Looks like 50'


Peter,Good point. I've never liked bow pulpits. Stupid looking things that could tear off your cap rail or worse if you bumped hard into a piling or whatever. And then most boaters think they get free moorage for those things stickin out into the walking space at almost all the marina's. Well I looked in my 1953 Motor Boating magazine and * * ..NO bow pulputs except on one sport fishing boat and there was no sign of it being used for an anchor. I have never noticed it before but most of the larger boats in the old mag had a small bent arm mast similar to our dinghy launching masts of today on the bow. I saw winches too but no anchors were hung on the bow like most do now. The boats sure look better. I believe the anchors were stowed on deck (almost all Danforth type) or removed from the rode and stored elsewhere. It's obvious that our current anchors were designed out of convenience and to some degree * .. laziness. Now we have push button anchoring where we don't even have to send the wife out on the bow to to do anchor battle. If we didn't invent anchor retrieval and storage as we know it we'd probably be still using Danforth anchors with the same holding power as these new anchors but not much capability on rocks. So, Peter it looks like the #1 design criteria that has determined the basic shape our anchors is stowability *and convenience * *.. not anchoring performance. And I do recall one of the hot selling points for the Danforth was that it stowed flat * *.. as in on the deck * *.. the proper place for an anchor * ..then. If form follows function we now know the most important element of the design of our anchors is stowability and convenience.


Eric










-- Edited by nomadwilly on Saturday 12th of June 2010 02:30:45 PM
Nomad Willy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2010, 03:07 PM   #37
Scraping Paint
 
City: -
Country: -
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,748
RE: Choosing the Right Anchor for Your Trawler

A life-long sailboat sailor on our dock told me that the main reason so many sailboats carry CQR anchors is that it was the first "multi-purpose" anchor to come out that would stow well on the bow of a sailboat. Danforth's are great in the fairly limited kinds of bottoms they're great in. But rocky, grassy, or hard-packed bottoms are not so good. Also bottoms with loose rocks or debris as it apparently doesn't take much to jam a fluke and then the anchor will never set.

The CQR plow was designed to work in a much wider variety of bottoms, as well as stow well on the bow or pulpit of a boat. Hence their continued popularity.

I don't like the CQR and would never have one, but I do not believe the notion that the only criteria that has driven anchor design beyond the basic Danforth has been convenience and laziness. I think the so-called "new generation" anchors are far superior to the "old standards" by nature of their designs.
Marin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-12-2010, 06:56 PM   #38
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,707
RE: Choosing the Right Anchor for Your Trawler

Hi Marin,Did the CQR come before the Bruce? I think it did but I'm quite sure these were the anchors that brought about the "hang it on the bow" stowage and that led to self launching. And since these anchors had less than stellar performance I'd say the convenience of the storage issue was the most important element of their design. Certainly not the only criteria. There were some stepping stone designs that were/are better like the Delta but a lot of time passed before the roll bar style emerged. At this point in time they seem to be superior but all we've got to go n is:
1. *Our own experience
2. *Dock talk
3. *Anchor tests
4. *Popularity
5. *Salesmen.
You and I both have something else as a primary anchor but it is a fact that in one or all the Yachting Monthly anchor tests a Danforth design anchor, a Fortress, out performed all other anchors in holding power tests and weighed 10lbs less. If the Fortress had been of equal weight there would have been no comparison.
Unless one has only one anchor (bad seamanship) one dosn't need an anchor that performs on all bottoms. So we all have the 2nd anchor anyway. It just takes a min to switch rodes. Bottoms that would give the Fortress fits are not rare but not (in my opinion) common either. In mud there are few anchors that perform well and the Fortress is almost certainly the best. The first roll bar anchor was not a stellar performer either. Anchors will get better but it may take quite a while as the convenience of bow storage and launching may be suppressing development again as it did in the heyday of Bruce/CQR. I still wish Mr Cook and Old Salt would weigh in here w their extensive experience.


Eric
Nomad Willy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2010, 01:31 AM   #39
Scraping Paint
 
City: -
Country: -
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,748
Choosing the Right Anchor for Your Trawler

I believe you're correct in that the CQR predates the Bruce. All the anchoring tests we reviewed in the process of selecting first our Bruce and later our Rocna put the Danforth design at the top of the list in terms of holding power in bottoms that were ideal for that design. Most anchor tests are conducted in sand or "normal" mud bottoms, hence the consistent top marks for the Danforth design.

A Danforth actually stows and deploys very well on the pulpit of our boat. In fact, this is the type of anchor that was on the boat when we bought it. Which makes sense since it spent its whole life in San Francisco Bay until we came along. The previous owners took it up the Sacramento River a fair amount which I assume has a mud bottom. So the Danforth was a smart choice for that area.

Not so much up here, although muddy anchorage bottoms are not uncommon. But so is eelgrass and seaweed and gravel and rocky bottoms, all of which can make it difficult to get a Danforth design to set well.

After a bunch of years of unreliable performance we decided that the very poor holding power of the Bruce far outweighed its excellent setting characteristics, and we went in search of something else.* We had no specific types or brands in mind.* We had purchased the Bruce largely because it is the anchor of choice for most powerboats up here and we assumed that this was because it was the best performer.* So while we didn't have any preconcieved notions about any other anchor types or makes (other than the Danforth type) we did have our requirements well defined. In order of importance, they were:

1. Holds extremely well in as wide a variety of bottoms as possible.
2. Sets fast and solidly in as wide a variety of bottoms as possible.
3. Resets fast and solidly if a wind change pulls it out.
4. Is very well and strongly made.
5. Can be easily backed out with a trip line if necessary.
6. Stows well on our pulpit.

We read lots of reviews of various anchor types, looked at lots of anchor tests, and read a lot of independent testimonials, all of which began to focus our attention on the new-generation anchors, specifically the roll-bar spade anchors. After reading as much as we could about them and studying their similarities and differences, we decided that the Manson has two inferior design attributes compared to the Rocna, so we bought a Rocna. So far, we've not been sorry.



-- Edited by Marin on Sunday 13th of June 2010 01:44:49 AM
Marin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2010, 05:03 AM   #40
TF Site Team
 
Peter B's Avatar
 
City: Brisbane
Country: Australia
Vessel Name: Lotus
Vessel Model: Clipper (CHB) 34 Sedan/Europa style
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 6,669
Send a message via Skype™ to Peter B
Choosing the Right Anchor for Your Trawler

Marin summed up the prerequisites of a good anchor as...

"1. Holds extremely well in as wide a variety of bottoms as possible.
2. Sets fast and solidly in as wide a variety of bottoms as possible.
3. Resets fast and solidly if a wind change pulls it out.
4. Is very well and strongly made.
5. Can be easily backed out with a trip line if necessary.
6. Stows well on our pulpit."

I couldn't agree more. However I also don't grieve the departure of the stowing of the anchor flat on the deck and respectfully suggest Eric that you don't waste any energy grieving after that era either. I used Danforths on my yachts, each stowed flat, and I had to haul them in by hand and there was nothing good about it. I don't mind the look of a sturdy, businesslike bowsprit and winch to house and retrieve the anchor. I think the self-launched deployment and powered retrieval this arrangement allows is simply mooorvelous, and would never go back. It allows for that extra weight we've all agreed is good, and the added safety of speedy deployment and retrieval in an emergency without the danger of the SO or skipper having to perch on a thrashing bow in nasty weather, which is when most sea-related dramas occur.* I also have vivid recollections of dragging anchor in our yacht, after it appeared set, so we were happily snorkeling a small way off when a passing boater called out "did we know we were dragging....?" Great - scooted back in the dinghy, and hauled the damn Danforth in, only to find one fluke point embedded in a discarded food can. Marin's point illustrated perfectly. So I applaud ongoing development in this most important function, and long may they keep improving. That's why those of us who have invested in newer designs keep raising the issue. We want to share the good news so others will also benefit. Not because we want to crack on about what we have as an exercise in one-upmanship.

-- Edited by Peter B on Sunday 13th of June 2010 05:07:24 AM
__________________

Peter B is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Choosing Dingy Davits for Your Trawler marinetrader Dinghys and Smaller Boats 18 02-27-2017 11:12 AM
Tips on Choosing the Best Battery for Your Trawler marinetrader Power Systems 14 05-26-2010 04:23 AM
Choosing a Marine Varnish marinetrader General Maintenance 10 11-26-2009 09:38 PM
Choosing an anchor (longish) Marin General Discussion 5 05-01-2009 08:41 AM
Choosing an Autopilot??? DonW Electrical and Electronics & Navigation 7 05-30-2008 11:36 PM




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:37 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012