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Old 01-19-2016, 01:13 PM   #1
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Chain and rope splice

Ok I'm new to all this having just purchased are Roughwater a few months back. So before even trying to anchor for the 1st time, I decided to pull all the chain and rope out and see what kind of condition they were in. Here's what I found.
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I had a hard time just getting this up out off the anchor locker, let alone how this is going to go around the windless. So my question is whats the best splice for chain to rope,one like this where the rope is weaved up the chain.
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Or the one that seams most popular is one
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And if this one would you splice it with a taper to help making the bend around the windless.
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Old 01-19-2016, 01:19 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by Russ Borman View Post
Ok I'm new to all this having just purchased are Roughwater a few months back. So before even trying to anchor for the 1st time, I decided to pull all the chain and rope out and see what kind of condition they were in. Here's what I found.
Attachment 48229
I had a hard time just getting this up out off the anchor locker, let alone how this is going to go around the windless. So my question is whats the best splice for chain to rope,one like this where the rope is weaved up the chain.
Attachment 48230
Or the one that seams most popular is one
Attachment 48231
And if this one would you splice it with a taper to help making the bend around the windless.
Mine is like the second and was professionally done. It goes through the windlass just fine.
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Old 01-19-2016, 02:17 PM   #3
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I've done a couple like the second example - no experience w/ the first.
Taper fairly easy to do and looks neat - may not be all that necessary.

Splicing isn't all that difficult - if you've ever done any the principle is the same w/ the chain splice. If you haven't done any just grad a length of scrap rope and practice following any number of on-line instructions... like this one
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Old 01-19-2016, 03:26 PM   #4
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Thanks Bacchus that's a cool web page. I have a Maxwell 1100 virtual windless and was reading that the tapered would do the 180 better?
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Old 01-19-2016, 04:07 PM   #5
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Thanks Bacchus that's a cool web page. I have a Maxwell 1100 virtual windless and was reading that the tapered would do the 180 better?
Taper will probably help - just practice a little and you should do fine.
The recommended taper is - "Various tapering methods can be used, but
Simpson Lawrence recommends three full tucks, then two additional tucks made with half-diameter strands This makes a compact, rapidly tapered splice.."


Electrical or masking tape on ends & where you unravel the 3 strand to helps keep things from loosening up too much while you're working with it.
Check the opposite end of your rope rode - it may be in better condition than the current "working" end. Might as well start w/ the best end.
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Old 01-19-2016, 05:34 PM   #6
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Depends on the type of line. For nylon, a thimble and an eye will work fine if it can pass through your windlass and hawse pipe. For brait, the long splice in the first photo is the way to go. I don't recommend the third method, but hey it's the most popular so go figure.


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Old 01-19-2016, 05:59 PM   #7
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In example 3, is it one link involved in the splice, or are others hidden within it? Very neat, but if only one link is involved, to me example 2 better/more safely spreads the load.
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Old 01-19-2016, 06:23 PM   #8
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I did the first with 8 plat as I don't like the need to re-due the 2nd type so often to deal with the chafe/weak single link wrap.

Took a few tries to look good but it works fine with the gypsy.
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Old 01-19-2016, 09:55 PM   #9
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[QUOTE=
Electrical or masking tape on ends & where you unravel the 3 strand to helps keep things from loosening up too much while you're working with it.
Check the opposite end of your rope rode - it may be in better condition than the current "working" end. Might as well start w/ the best end.[/QUOTE]

When splicing 3 strand I use red, white, and blue electrical tape one color per strand I can keep track of the threading sequence better that way.
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Old 01-19-2016, 10:05 PM   #10
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When splicing 3 strand I use red, white, and blue electrical tape one color per strand I can keep track of the threading sequence better that way.

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Old 01-19-2016, 11:44 PM   #11
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I have a vertical windlass and the taper in the splice makes a lot of difference in how it feeds down into the chain pipe. The longer the taper the better it makes that 90 degree turn down the hole... I usually wind up resplicing once during the summer due to loosening up of the splice over time, and am considering whipping each end to one strand of the line to keep it from loosening up. Looking forward to trying plait in my next anchor line...
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Old 01-20-2016, 08:36 AM   #12
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In example 3, is it one link involved in the splice, or are others hidden within it? Very neat, but if only one link is involved, to me example 2 better/more safely spreads the load.
All three strands of the line pass through the last link in the chain (two from one direction, one from the other direction). There's no real need to spread the load, each link is as strong as the rest and failure of any link has the same result.


If you buy a pre-made rope to chain rode, this is the way it will be spliced.
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Old 01-20-2016, 08:58 AM   #13
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All three strands of the line pass through the last link in the chain (two from one direction, one from the other direction). There's no real need to spread the load, each link is as strong as the rest and failure of any link has the same result.


If you buy a pre-made rope to chain rode, this is the way it will be spliced.


True, but at only one point is each strand "working" at the chain link and it needs to turn 180^ at that point, and all wear is at that one point. In the weave the line is "working at many links and none at a 180^ angle.

IMO if the weave works in your setup, while harder and more time consuming (why it is not done with store bought rode) it makes a longer lasting and stronger attachment. Just not a pretty.
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Old 01-20-2016, 12:54 PM   #14
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Chain Splice Strength

Obvious to me there are personal preferences in favor of each the above methods. I'n not trying to "sell" anyone on either as my experience is somewhat limited (and all w/ the back splice rode to chain approach.

Here is some interesting info I've come across that may go counter to initial intuitive thoughts.

First - a real study of chain splice strength by West Marine - show greater initial strength than I would have thought - granted it's new spices w/o chafe but still higher results than I would have expected. I have never found comparable test of the weave approach.

"Conclusions
1. The chain used in this test is conservatively rated, and withstood loads at least 5-50% above its stated ultimate strength. The shackles also exceeded their ultimate strength ratings by 10-30%. Both products have a high ratio of ultimate strength to working load limit.
2. The small radius of the rope to chain splice reduced the ultimate strength of the line by about 12% in the case of 5/8" line, and 25% in the case of 1/2" line. This value is comparable to the strength of conventional (non-Caprolan) 5/8" three strand nylon (10,400 lbs.) and conventional 1/2" three strand
nylon line (5,750 lbs.)
3. If the chain splice is examined for chafe on a regular basis, we find no objections to the rope to chain splice from a strength reduction standpoint, as it appears close in strength to other components in the
system and to commonly available nylon line."


Second - post from another forum that claims the woven splicing method actually has a pretty high chafe rate (I'm assuming due to the contact / compression of the rode between the gypsy and the chain)

"The Bluemoment wrap chain splice is probably stronger but beware that if you start using the windlass it will eat the splice. I tried this a few years ago and within about five up and downs notice the line was being chafed very quickly. Went back to the crown splice. Crown splice moves through the windlass very well. YMMV..."

Another website re: anchor splicing that supports the above contention of high chafe w/ the weave approach.
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Old 01-20-2016, 01:56 PM   #15
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FWIW, I've always used the third method (tapered back splice, crown splice, or shackle splice) illustrated here:

http://www.jamestowndistributors.com...t.do?docId=917

It runs through the windlass reasonably well, sometimes with a little help to get it started. In 17 summers of cruising BC and SE Alaska and many hundreds of overnight anchorages, it has never failed to work well, and never looked excessively worn. I cut off and reverse the rope and resplice at the end of every season.


I started making really decent three-strand splices after meeting Brion Toss, author of Chapman's book of knots (and splices), at his booth at the Seattle boat show. With just a few hints he greatly improved my technique.

Some hints: flatten out each of the three strands after you unlay them and tie on a constrictor - don't keep them twisted and round. Cut their ends into a bit of a taper, and then tape around each end with masking tape making somewhat of a point. After each round of three over and under tucks, roll the splice between your hands to firm it up and even it out, then pull each of the three strands tight, and maybe roll again, before the next round of three tucks. You shouldn't need more than 5-7 rounds of tucks, if they're done right.

In my experience, the best three-strand splicing tool is Brion's "Point Hudson Phid" - makes splicing so much easier than a basic fid! The directions for eye splicing that come with it are pretty good even without a book. Google Brion Toss to find his web site. (no connection except as a satified user)
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Old 01-20-2016, 02:12 PM   #16
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RCOOK thanks for the info, that's what I'm going to do . I plan on doing my boating on the BC coast and SE Alaska and it's good to hear from some one that's been there and done that so to speak.
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Old 01-20-2016, 03:59 PM   #17
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We just ordered all new chain (5/16") braided to 5/8" line from HopCar (Parks). He did it for hundreds less than any other quote we got and had his guys (or girls... or HIM) to make the splice for us for only $10.

That said, it was the splice in the 3rd picture. With 200' of chain in the Neuse River, it is unlikely we will play out to even see the line or a while (except every year to inspect) and with a horizontal gypsy, it has to make a hellacious series of turns to get into the locker (Like 200+ degrees around the gypsy and a sharp downward turn to the locker). I am not sure the middle one would make it without issues. But I am only guessing.
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Old 01-20-2016, 05:31 PM   #18
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To you guys that are planning to use 8 plait.... Good luck on the eye splice to chain. I was a Boatswain Mate in the Navy. I can splice 3 strand pretty much in my sleep. The 8 plait rope to chain eat me alive. I had the utube humming on how to and it took me about 3 hours for one "simple" splice.

I love the rode, does not tangle, not stiff, great stuff but a real bitch to splice.
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Old 01-21-2016, 06:50 AM   #19
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For folks that enjoy the marlinspike art, the classic is

The Ashley Book of Knots - By Clifford W - Amazon.com‎

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Old 01-21-2016, 08:15 AM   #20
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For folks that enjoy the marlinspike art, the classic is

The Ashley Book of Knots - By Clifford W - Amazon.com‎

Adwww.amazon.com/books‎
4.4 rating for amazon.com
Ashley Free Shipping on Qualified Orders.
Ratings:Website 10/10 - Shipping 10/10 - Selection 10/10
Does it show splicing as well as knots?
Also where would one purchase splicing tools?
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