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Old 10-23-2014, 05:31 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by caltexflanc View Post
Disagree; you want something that will stretch, that's the whole point.
Exactly! Using a line with little or no stretch defeats one of the main purposes of using a snubber. Unless of course you add some type of stretchy strain releaving rubber mooring snubber to the lines.
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Old 10-24-2014, 03:19 AM   #42
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Originally Posted by Capt.Bill11 View Post
Exactly! Using a line with little or no stretch defeats one of the main purposes of using a snubber.
The soft shackles are only a few inches long. They are used as a means of attaching the nylon snubber to the chain. As you point out, Dyneema is no good as a snubber. It needs to be nylon for the stretch. Evans Starzinger, who I think initially came up with idea of using soft shackles for this purpose, has done some work on creating the ideal snubber. It consists of some Dyneeema used where the line goes over the bow roller. Dyneema has fantastic chafe resistance which is ideal for this role. This is followed by a long length of nylon for the necessary stretch connected to the chain via a soft shackle. You can of course rig the same idea as a bridle if this is applicable for your boat.

The "ideal" snubber is overkill for most applications, but it has a lot of merit for extreme conditions. The main drawback is that adjusting the snubber length is difficult.

While on the subject of extreme conditions the use of two independent snubbers is worth considering. With one left slight loose as a reserve. Chafe is very good at eating away through nylon. If you are using a small diameter snubber, as you should be, there is little strength margin for even small amounts of chafe. A broken snubber particularly if there is loop of chain will cause the boat to come to a very abrupt stop if the boat gathers a bit of momentum and is stopped by the non elastic chain.
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Old 10-24-2014, 09:23 AM   #43
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Originally Posted by FF View Post
How do you plan on scrubbing the chain after each use to keep the stench of dead critters in the mud out of the boat???

On a larger boat a 1inch deck power wash and a scrub brush works .
I'm already using 30 ft. of chain now. That 30 ft. is is on the anchor end of the rode, and therefore is the part that is most frequently in contact with the seabed. Mud has not been an issue to date.

I suspect this is a regional issue. I cruise in a relatively fixed radius, and the places I go don't typically have the slime you're concerned about.
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Old 06-10-2017, 08:24 AM   #44
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So I'm embarrassed to ask, but you tie/untie the knot in the Dyneema each time?
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Old 06-10-2017, 11:45 AM   #45
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Originally Posted by Stickman View Post
So I'm embarrassed to ask, but you tie/untie the knot in the Dyneema each time?
I have asked more silly questions than anyone here. So never worry.

I am not sure to what you are referring. If you mean the soft shackle, then no. Some of us use a soft shackle to connect the snubber or bridle to the chain. A soft shackle is made up ahead of time and is reused. It simply has a knot on one end and a loop on the other. The knot is inserted through the loop and the shackle will not come loose. The shackles are easy to make and are inexpensive. Here is a photo of one I made that is pretty typical.
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Old 06-10-2017, 11:58 PM   #46
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Originally Posted by Stickman View Post
So I'm embarrassed to ask, but you tie/untie the knot in the Dyneema each time?
As Dhays states, if you use a soft shackle, you attach it each time you deploy the snubber and detach it on retrieval. These are generally stronger than the chain, and are pretty easy to make. This video helps explain how:

http://www.animatedknots.com/softshackle/index.php

What they don't show here is the desirability of really cinching down on the stop knot. I use the hydraulic hoist to put a lot of pressure on the knot before trimming the ends.

This solution depends on a snubber with a cringle on the end that allows you to attach the snubber to the chain with the soft shackle.
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Old 06-14-2017, 08:13 PM   #47
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I've always gotten by with two lines, one from each side, secured to my all chain rode with rolling hitches. I have 50' lines, and generally use about 25' per side. This allows me to pay out more rode without having to read-tie the rolling hitches if needed. Sure, it is a bit of a pain, but the hitches work well, and never fall off.

Cheer, Bill
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Old 06-14-2017, 08:43 PM   #48
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Originally Posted by Montenido View Post
I've always gotten by with two lines, one from each side, secured to my all chain rode with rolling hitches. I have 50' lines, and generally use about 25' per side. This allows me to pay out more rode without having to read-tie the rolling hitches if needed. Sure, it is a bit of a pain, but the hitches work well, and never fall off.

Cheer, Bill

At first I created a very heavy double braid pendant with a splice galvanized eye in one end. I used a soft shackle to connect it to the two nylon eyes of the legs of my bridle. I then just tied the pendent to the chain with a rolling hitch. It worked fine. After a while I found it just easier to use a dyneema loop and soft shackle to connect to the chair.Click image for larger version

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Old 07-18-2017, 09:54 PM   #49
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Originally Posted by caltexflanc View Post
I do not advise using a standard chain hook like the "eye grab" pictured in RTF's summary. They tend to twist the chain and its link. Also the easiest to fall off, as I learned on a couple of charters, finally substituting a rolling hitch.

I had the ABI pictured, but I don't think it is made any more. Served us extremely well in hundreds of nights including some terrible conditions. But so did a rolling hitch (or two) for that matter, which preceded a friend giving me the ABI as a present. I liked the double bridle aspect; the boat tends to lay to one line or the other as it horses, except in big blows, when you get both taut. But so did a rolling hitch (or two) for that matter, which preceded a friend giving me the ABI as a present. Something like the Mantus or the devil's claw types:


From Defender:

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Old 07-18-2017, 10:58 PM   #50
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Fisheries Supply have a "Sea Dog" flat ss plate with a U groove in which the chain sits. It`s good. You attach 2 lines to it which go back to the cleat.
I don`t like the bear claw hook type, uneven loading of the chain imo but in fairness, mine never failed or broke the chain.
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Old 07-19-2017, 02:21 PM   #51
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Sailboat snap shackels are plenty strong and with some heat shrink to keep the chain galvanizing are hard to beat.

Best of all there so cheap that a number of lines of different thickness can be made up.

The 1/4 inch nylon will usually work up to about 15K , where a bit thicker line would be better for the smoothest ride.

Remember the line will not begin to work till at 10% or so if the lines breaking strength, which is a high number even with thin line.

Protect thin line from chafe.
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