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Old 10-21-2014, 11:32 PM   #21
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I've had good luck with this Anchor Shockles when anchored with all chain. When I let out enough for my line rode, of course, it's not needed.

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Old 10-22-2014, 01:53 AM   #22
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I don't know if these plates come in different slot sizes.
The Sea Dog ones do not. The one size is supposed to fit 'all types of chains in the following sizes: 5/16", 3/8", 7/16" and 1/2" '.

Downwind Marine carries them also.
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Old 10-22-2014, 03:28 AM   #23
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I would add my support for a a soft shackle in this application.

They are very strong, reliable, quick and easy to do and undo, no chance of jam, can be cut (with difficulty) if this ever becomes necessary. They can be wound over the bow roller without any risk of damaging anything. Finally they don't wear the galvanising like a chain hook can.

The only drawback compared to a chain hook is that they need to be within reach to do or undo. Some of the chain hooks can be flicked off once the pressure on the snubber is released.

I have used one for the last 150 nights at at anchor and it has been my best solution for snubber attachment. Give one a try. If you don't like it soft shackles have lots of other boat uses, so it won't go to waste.

They can be made quite inexpensively, but my wife does this so I cannot give any practical tips.
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Old 10-22-2014, 06:07 AM   #24
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Most sail boat snap shakels are rated to 6000lbs , ez on ez off , and wont just fall off as a chain claw might.

Most likely it will be for a night or two , so wearing the galvanizing out on a chain link is not an issue.
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Old 10-22-2014, 07:03 AM   #25
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Yes the snubber has not got the same strength as the chain so in most circumstances it is going to snap before the shackle, but you still do need to be a little careful.

If you take the key pin shackle shown in post# 21 for example. Wichard list the WL (working load) as only 800kg for the largest model with an 8mm pin.

Anchoring forces can exceed this. If the pin bends and it jams it is going to be difficult and slow to fix, at least on leaping foredeck with a dragging anchor.

It would need some extreme conditions for this to occur but for most boats the chain could not be retrieved until the shackle was removed.
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Old 10-22-2014, 07:21 AM   #26
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If one expects to have a smooth anchor ride the best start is to purchase 30 ft of line from 1/4 inch up.

To be effective the nylon must stretch and it takes 10% to 15% of the lines rated load to Begin to stretch.

Only light line will stretch enough to bother with as a snubber..

When you finally decide what weight is best for your boat install the line to a U bolt as close to the waterline as you can.

Make the line long , BUT not long enough to reach the prop if lost overboard.

The difference in the boats ride anchored in slop can be amazing.

Most times we anchor with 5/8 nylon , almost no chain , and a thin snubber with a hitch will take the shock loading out of the anchor system.
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Old 10-22-2014, 07:46 AM   #27
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OK got it, indeed I read the post as making the whole assembly up out of Dyneema. Soft shackles are cool and useful but I, for my own skills, dispute that they are easier to secure and unsecure to chain than a proper chain hook. Also one thing I didn't like in using rolling hitches was difficulty running the line around outside and up through the pulpit chute (I learned to not like running it straight through the pulpit for a few reasons). I guess I would also be a little paranoid, perhaps unjustifiably, about them loosening up while slack. I've seen sail boat guys add lashing in some applications to offset this.

With the double bridle set up, it can be pre set and ready to go and out of the way. Yes, it is a little awkward some times reaching through the chute to drop the hook on. However, a side benefit is that when retrieving, detaching is easy and I leave it rigged so that if the anchor needs extra breaking out I can reattach it quickly, taking the load completely off the pulpit and windlass; one of the reasons I don't like running snubber lines through the chute.
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Old 10-22-2014, 10:08 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by markpierce View Post
Believe the OP's rode set-up (combination chain and line) is the better idea for his boat.
And I would tend to agree with you. I think an all chain rode is completely overkill for my boat. The catenary achieved with a all chain rode is appealing on principal, but not necessary for my application under normal circumstances.

I anchor from Friday to Sunday every single weekend of the boating season. I tend to do this is in very, very crowded anchorages which are also frequented by a large number of small day boaters. Many boaters seem to think the anchor line disappears once it goes under water. While the others discount how much draft they are actually drawing. The result is I have had my anchor wound in someone's wheel more than once.

In addition, I like the shorter swing radius when things get confused as well as the ability to more safely short-scope when things get tight.

These are my reasons for considering all chain. My reasons for this post have been realized by many who have discussed the chain hook dropping off. That is one of the reasons a simple chain/lifting hook (such as one from a home store) is a concern of mine.

I intend on rigging a double bridle. I don't have a windlass, so the admiral is up there hauling a 25lb anchor by hand. I'm not about to start asking her to tie rolling blocks and the like. The solution I provide her must be very easy to deploy. The Mantus is very appealing.
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Old 10-22-2014, 10:49 AM   #29
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It looks to me from the photo that you need to tie a knot every time you use the Dyneema "chain hook." Is that correct? Then to remove it you need to untie the knot?

I made a dinghy lifting bridle of Dyneema for a friend. Lightweight and soft. He used it twice, then replaced it with SS wire rope. He (and me too) couldn't wrap his head around the fact that Dyneema is that kind of strong. I know it is, but it seems impossible.

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Old 10-22-2014, 10:59 AM   #30
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Originally Posted by caltexflanc View Post
OK got it, indeed I read the post as making the whole assembly up out of Dyneema. Soft shackles are cool and useful but I, for my own skills, dispute that they are easier to secure and unsecure to chain than a proper chain hook. Also one thing I didn't like in using rolling hitches was difficulty running the line around outside and up through the pulpit chute (I learned to not like running it straight through the pulpit for a few reasons). I guess I would also be a little paranoid, perhaps unjustifiably, about them loosening up while slack. I've seen sail boat guys add lashing in some applications to offset this.

With the double bridle set up, it can be pre set and ready to go and out of the way. Yes, it is a little awkward some times reaching through the chute to drop the hook on. However, a side benefit is that when retrieving, detaching is easy and I leave it rigged so that if the anchor needs extra breaking out I can reattach it quickly, taking the load completely off the pulpit and windlass; one of the reasons I don't like running snubber lines through the chute.
I've been using the single snubber with rolling hitch over the pulpit roller...what have you seen that's an issue if you don't mind????

PM if better...
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Old 10-22-2014, 11:01 AM   #31
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It looks to me from the photo that you need to tie a knot every time you use the Dyneema "chain hook." Is that correct? Then to remove it you need to untie the knot?

I made a dinghy lifting bridle of Dyneema for a friend. Lightweight and soft. He used it twice, then replaced it with SS wire rope. He (and me too) couldn't wrap his head around the fact that Dyneema is that kind of strong. I know it is, but it seems impossible.

Howard

no...the little loop is like a slip knot you can pull the knotted end through..
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Old 10-22-2014, 11:13 AM   #32
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Quote:
no...the little loop is like a slip knot you can pull the knotted end through..
... and that is a form of tying a knot! Especially adding in looping through or around the chain and through the snubber eye. For those of us with not so great fine motor skills , that's an issue.

Quote:
I've been using the single snubber with rolling hitch over the pulpit roller...what have you seen that's an issue if you don't mind???
1)Chafe by rubbing against the chain and when horsing, against edges of the chute.
2) If no samson post, having to run it around the windlass capstan (if you even have a capstan) to center it through the chute, putting some side loading on the windlass, especially during big blows and when using the snubber to break out the anchor.
3) As you are retrieving the rode, having to pull in the snubber line to avoid jamming
4) When breaking out the anchor, putting pressure on the pulpit.
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Old 10-22-2014, 11:32 AM   #33
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It looks to me from the photo that you need to tie a knot every time you use the Dyneema "chain hook." Is that correct? Then to remove it you need to untie the knot?
As Psneeld said there is no need to untie any knots.

All you do is push the knot through the loop. As the tension is applied the loop closes.

The string is used to open the loop
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Old 10-22-2014, 11:38 AM   #34
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... and that is a form of tying a knot! Especially adding in looping through or around the chain and through the snubber eye. For those of us with not so great fine motor skills , that's an issue.



1)Chafe by rubbing against the chain and when horsing, against edges of the chute.
2) If no samson post, having to run it around the windlass capstan (if you even have a capstan) to center it through the chute, putting some side loading on the windlass, especially during big blows and when using the snubber to break out the anchor.
3) As you are retrieving the rode, having to pull in the snubber line to avoid jamming
4) When breaking out the anchor, putting pressure on the pulpit.
thank you..fortunately none of those have been an issue with my boat..I'll keep them in mind
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Old 10-22-2014, 11:39 AM   #35
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"The Mantus is very appealing. "

The new Mantus chain hook has a little locking lever that prevents the chain accidentally dislodging. The one I bought last year did not and although I have never had a problem will probably add this feature to mine.
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Old 10-22-2014, 12:31 PM   #36
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As Psneeld said there is no need to untie any knots.

All you do is push the knot through the loop. As the tension is applied the loop closes.

The string is used to open the loop
Having used soft shackles a bit, I have to disagree. And again, I have some fine motor skill challenges so it is amplified in my case.

Maybe it is just a matter of semantics, but that is tying a knot, running a bitter end through a loop and tightening in a certain fashion, then that pulling apart to untie. Now add to the "tying process" first feeding the line through the pad eye or (especially) a chain link and an eye/thimble, and I am really in the knot tying and untying business. Perhaps not such a big deal for the more adept, but add in tying it while kneeling down on a moving boat deck, and personally it's fuggadditaboutit time for me. But to each their own; once in place the soft shackle in this application would have some advantages as noted.
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Old 10-23-2014, 06:26 AM   #37
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>I'm considering moving to an all chain rode. I have a small boat at 28' & 8,500lbs.<

How do you plan on scrubbing the chain after each use to keep the stench of dead critters in the mud out of the boat???

On a larger boat a 1inch deck power wash and a scrub brush works .

But on a 28 ft boat its going to be crowded at the bow as you raise the chain and scrub it before going down the chain hole.

Storing it on deck stops the stench has hassles with most capstans requiring the weight of the chain to stay engaged.
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Old 10-23-2014, 10:06 AM   #38
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Another "10 minute project" for this season. The first mate will get the Manson Hook.
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Old 10-23-2014, 01:41 PM   #39
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All snubbers a are a p.i.a. That said they become necessary when you use an all chain rode or wish to anchor ahull for various reasons.

On your boat I wouldn't add more chain you already have a perfect set up. On my sportfishing boat I only use the boats length in chain and the rest is nylon brait. But since you asked about hooks I'll add my 2 cents.

I've used the wichard, the mantus, the eye, soft shackles and of course the rolling hitch. My preference is the simple eye hook. The problems most people experience with them falling off stems from not allowing enough of a bight of free chain to hang bellow the attachment point. Sea flywright'a photo. If you can't drive your dinghy through the bight you need to let out more chain. The excess chain acts like a kellet and adds more dampening to the rode plus it keeps the hook attached.


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Old 10-23-2014, 03:05 PM   #40
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The problems most people experience with them [chain hooks] falling off stems from not allowing enough of a bight of free chain to hang bellow the attachment point.
This is very true. We use a V-bridle snubber with the chain gripper plate I illustrated some posts back. We were taught to first let out let out enough chain between the gripper and the pulpit roller to keep the chain securely in the gripper slot.

Then we let out enough chain while feeding out the two snubber lines to put the gripper plate a good ten feet or so below the surface of the water.

Finally, we let out more chain so the bight hangs a good fifteen feet or more below the gripper plate. Besides ensuring that the chain stays firmly in the slot, this also helps lower the angle of pull on the anchor.

We put the gripper on the chain in such a way that when the anchor is retrieved, when the slack comes out of the chain the gripper falls off the chain to hang below the bow of the boat out of the way of the incoming chain. Once the anchor is stowed on the pulpit, we pull up the V-bridle with the gripper plate.
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