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Old 05-20-2012, 01:16 PM   #81
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So Marin the sailboat CQR guy still has his CQR and it sounds like it is'nt in his lazerette. And Marin when you get 25 to 40 years on your miracle hook we'll listen to your dragging stories.

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Old 05-20-2012, 02:35 PM   #82
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Chip Chip Whine Whine
I'm more of a wine wine guy.

Yesterday we took a trip to the marina where we're going to keep Scout. (yes almost back in the water). I wanted to touch base with the truckers and get a look at the their trailer. While we were there waiting on the guys we walked the docks.
There was a very nice 40 something foot long canoe sterned sailboat. I believe it was a Cheoy Lee, teak decks, butterfly hatches, bronze winches all meticulously maintained. Nestled in the bow pulpit were two CQR sized in the 50# range. I looked at them and thought...'perfect, anything else would be a sacrilege'.
Hanging an XYZ up there would be like putting 22" wheels on '69 Camaro.
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Old 05-20-2012, 07:32 PM   #83
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Chip,
Looks like you've got a good scope on things.
Wonderful to hear you're about to get back in the water.
We're about to get back "on" the water.
We're running out of space on Willy so I'm going to leave the Claw on the bow because it fits. Got 4 other anchors.

Does anybody know much about the CQR and it's articulated shank?
I notice new CQRs are fairly expensive.
Is there any advantage to the extremely long shank?
Has anybody welded "ears" on the outboard edges of the shank like they do w the Forfjords to enhance soft mud performance?

I'm still watching that DVD from Anchor Right (Sarca) and making more observations. In one "pull" w 4 anchors a Danforth, CQR and Sarca have already more or less set after a pull of about 7' but the 4th anchor was a Kedge and it had'nt even begun to set. I thought the Kedge was the fastest setting anchor in existence Mmmmmmmm And I still think there is no images of a Sarca setting on it's side. They just sorta flip right side up every time.
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Old 05-20-2012, 11:35 PM   #84
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And Marin when you get 25 to 40 years on your miracle hook we'll listen to your dragging stories.
Well, we're a third of the way toward 25 years with our "miracle hook" and no dragging yet. Hope you aren't holding your breath for that first time.
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Old 05-21-2012, 02:12 AM   #85
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Well, we're a third of the way toward 25 years with our "miracle hook" and no dragging yet. Hope you aren't holding your breath for that first time.
There's always a first time.
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Old 05-21-2012, 07:54 AM   #86
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I asked a long-time sailor (40 years with the same boat) on our dock why the CQR is so popular with sail boaters. This is a guy who anchors out almost exclusively, and has a CQR. He said it's simple-- the CQR was the first anchor to come out that stowed easily on a bow or pulpit. So sailboaters loved them. He said he's had good luck with his but has had it drag on occasion in soft mud. The hardest things to get it to set in, according to him, are weedy bottoms and hard bottoms. He feels there are better anchor designs out there but his CQR has served him fine over the years and it stows perfectly on his bow.
"Exactly so", as my Dutch friend would say. It is a "remarkable fine anchor" - once it is set - but a dog to set in weedy and firm bottoms, as mentioned above. It was when mine dragged 8 times in a row, in the space of about an hour, just trying to get set for a quick lunch in a well-known weedy bottomed anchorage here in Moreton Bay, that I decided, nice fit on the pulpit or not, it had to go....the rest, as they say, is history I won't bore y'all with again. However, I will admit, CQRs would still outnumber other types of anchor, even here, for the reasons also mentioned above. But the numbers are slowly dwindling.
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Old 05-21-2012, 05:43 PM   #87
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I'm surprised Peter. I've never see an area where they are the most numerous. Most places I go or have been the Claw is most prevalent.

Still no Rocnas up here Marin. I think it will be a long time till you drag but Mark's right ....could be right around the corner. And no ...I'm breath'in just fine.
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Old 05-21-2012, 09:02 PM   #88
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I would guess--- but have never bothered to wander around counting--- that the numbers of Bruce/Bruce knockoffs and CQRs in our marina are about equal. I see more sailboats with CQRs than Bruces, and more powerboats with Bruces than CQRs. But together, these two types make up the most numerous anchor types in our marina. I see very few Danforth/Danforth types, at least on pulpits. Fortresses are popular as stern anchors, as on our boat.

There is a slowly growing number of rollbar anchors in the marina, Rocna or Manson, which so far as I know are the only two types available in this area. I suspect that might be one reason you don't see any your way--- perhaps nobody carries them and they would be expensive to ship up. I saw a lot of them in a commercial fishing/marine supply store in Steveston, BC near the mouth of the Fraser River last year. All different sizes including some pretty substantial ones that looked to be well over 100 pounds.
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Old 05-21-2012, 11:43 PM   #89
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Marin,
Do'nt remember any other roll bar anchors either. And I'll bet most of the Danforths are below decks. They are lightweight anchors and great for 20' boats.

Today I traded a good Danforth for this old (but not very rusty) Dreadnought. Do'nt know what it weighs yet or what I'll do w it but I just had to have it. Should set OK (I think) in all but the hardest bottoms. It's a bit like the Forfjord and much like the Navy anchor but w a much longer shank than both. I'll bet the biggest downside for this old guy is breaking it out when it's time to go. I can imagine pulling up the rode tight and backing down perhaps more than once in sticky mud to get this guy out. Otherwise it should work well as long as I can get it to set. To know it's really set I'll prolly need to back down and be very attentive to dragging. It should hold better than many but I'm sure it wo'nt hold as a roll bar or Fortress would. It looks like a 1920s style anchor.
Oh I do see one neat trick in the design. The skid or pad at the far end of the anchor will probably impart considerable downward force on the fluke tips. Kinda like a lever. Danforths do it too but w less mechanical advantage. I'm impressed.
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Old 05-22-2012, 12:38 AM   #90
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Marin,
Do'nt remember any other roll bar anchors either. And I'll bet most of the Danforths are below decks. They are lightweight anchors and great for 20' boats.
I've seen some boats here with some pretty big Danforths. Our boat had a Danforth knock-off when we bought it. We gave it to a friend who wanted it for yard art. He weiged it out of curiosity and told us it was about 60 pounds. It was probably a good anchor for the boat prior to our acquiring it as the boat had spent its whole life until then in SFO Bay. Mostly mud bottoms there as I understand it, and the Danforth-type is ideal for that sort of thing. No so useful for up here, though, which is why we got rid of it the day after we got the boat to Bellingham.
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Old 05-22-2012, 12:42 PM   #91
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How true Marin. The Danforth I described as a lightweight anchor need not be at all if one has a large enough one. But if one compares steel anchors w a given fluke area the Danforth will be the lightest one. You often hear "bigger is better" re anchors but seldom heavier is better. The blade area is the variable that delivers holding power if an anchor is of good design and good design is (over the last 10 yrs) a variable that is becoming a bigger element in anchor performance. I think there is lots to learn so I hope anchor tests improve and do'nt fade away. As far as interest goes it looks like there are lots of designs that are very different from each other. Anchors could be in rather early developmental stage where many products are very different from each other. Cars and airplanes have been quite diverse in the recent past but the ideal vehicle has'nt yet been devised as there are still big differences in some.

As for my Dreadnought anchor if fluke area is going to decide holding power I'll be dragging all over the place so weight better enter the picture in a big way or I'd be better off w a Claw. But the big wedge shaped part in the back of the Dreadnought will probably come into the picture as blade area like the roll bar does w roll bar anchors. That could up the performance of the Dreadnought quite a bit. But being a stockless anchor like the Forfjord it's possible or even likely that they could set on one fluke.....not good....however during a reversal one fluke may be buried all the time greatly reducing the likelihood of a breakout. So many variables.
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Old 05-22-2012, 05:14 PM   #92
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Well of course with cars you have the whole consumer appeal issue to deal with. The aerodynamics and configuration numbers tell you some things but then there is the whole personal appeal thing and the desire of a lot of people to drive something that's at least a little if not a lot different from what the guy next door is driving. It's why I will never buy a Prius as long as they look like what they look like, which in my opinion is butt ugly even though technically they are great machines.

Airplanes, at least jetliners, all look the same, Boeing or Airbus, because the laws of aerodynamics and physics don't care about brand names so we all have to conform to the same laws. So everything ends up looking pretty much the same because we're all using the same numbers.

Anchors are purely functional-- all they have to do is dig in and hold. Consumers don't really care what they look like as long as they do the job. There are a number of ways to do that job and probably some nobody's thought of yet. So it makes sense that the designs are so radically different.
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Old 05-22-2012, 07:17 PM   #93
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Anchors are purely functional-- all they have to do is dig in and hold. Consumers don't really care what they look like as long as they do the job.
If that's true, why do they make so many stainless anchors?
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Old 05-22-2012, 07:21 PM   #94
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i almost managed to fall asleep reading this thread..
j/k
but man do you guys like to discuss anchors
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Old 05-22-2012, 09:08 PM   #95
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If that's true, why do they make so many stainless anchors?
Okay, fair point. I should have said MOST people don't care what they look like.
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Old 05-22-2012, 09:09 PM   #96
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i almost managed to fall asleep reading this thread..
j/k
but man do you guys like to discuss anchors
Yeah, it's like when people talk about the ICW forever. BORING. It's a ditch. That's all you need to know.

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Old 05-22-2012, 09:33 PM   #97
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If that's true, why do they make so many stainless anchors?
The anchor is butt ugly but SHINY...often like their boat...but it's been said before..."to each their own"...
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Old 05-22-2012, 10:02 PM   #98
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GULF INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY

That would be from south Fla through Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas to the Mexican border.

I was giving a presentation about it in Houston at a Trawler Fest and made a statement that garnered a boistrious ovation. All I said was that so many look at the Gulf ICW as a chore when, in truth, it is a destination.

First it is deep, no shoaling problems, that are left to fester anyway and there are cities and towns all along that actually welcome boaters, granted some more than others, and your expenses will be a FRACTION of the Atlantic ICW and the east coast.

I have way more than 20,000 miles on it and have traveled the length of it many times.
There are a few, relatively short, sections that are are more like a river but not many.
The "ditch" portions are minuscule compared to the total length.

I always make mention that those who complete the Great Circle Cruise and do not turn West at the Gulf, skipping Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas are missing out on some great cruising and at a fraction of the cost of the east coast.
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Old 05-22-2012, 10:30 PM   #99
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I weighed the Dreadnought and it's 36lbs. I was surprised as I thought it was heavier. After I carried it around town a bit I found it heavy enough so I used the cart to take it back to the boat. I've decided to mount it on the deck like a Danforth and put my Claw on the other side. I'm rigged so I can launch any one of my anchors in a minute or so.

Another interesting aspect of the Dreadnought is it's extremely wide throat angle. It's often said that the Danforth needs to be exactly 37 degrees and the Dreadnought is WAY wider.
Also I talked to a long time fisherman today and he said everybody that has one likes them. So they can't be all bad. But fishermen rave about the Forfjord and I couldn't get mine to set the one time I tried it. And my Danforth did set.

With the long heavy shank and wide throat angle it's easy to put on the bow roller for launching.
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Old 05-23-2012, 06:01 AM   #100
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"I always make mention that those who complete the Great Circle Cruise and do not turn West at the Gulf, skipping Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas are missing out on some great cruising and at a fraction of the cost of the east coast."

WE almost always anchor out , which so far is FREE!

A fraction of the cost of FREE is an interesting concept.

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