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Old 06-01-2013, 10:00 PM   #21
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Having all chain means one doesn't have to deal with two different types of rode and its related issues with the windlass. ... Besides, the Coot needs lots of weight in the bow to counter full fuel and water tanks.

Al, 360 feet of rode seems excessive in our/your waters. Did it come with the boat?

-- I'm recalling the time you had me pull on the rode from the rode locker (saving Meg the effort) when your windlass was slipping.
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Old 06-01-2013, 10:15 PM   #22
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The gypsy can winch it all up without a hitch. Unless you had the right size line and chain and spliced it. How often is that done?
I know one boater who did.

Mark, my boat came with about 200 rode and 30 ft chain with a rope-only power winch. I still carry that as a spare.

When I converted to a windlass, I consulted with the windlass dealer on their recommendations for rode and chain and came up with 270 ft Brait/30 ft chain. I later lost 30 ft of rode during a prop-fouling incident. Then after about a year, I added another 90 ft of chain. So now it's 120 chain/240 Brait. The Brait lays so flat that it doesn't even come close to the limit of my anchor locker. My old 200 rode/30 chain took up more space.

I'd rather have it and not need it than the other way around.

My clutch loosened that day. I just needed to tighten it with that special wrench they gave me with the windlass, then no more issues since.
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Old 06-01-2013, 10:19 PM   #23
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Why not, Al. Was just wondering. Still, I believe you'd be better off with all chain.
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Old 06-01-2013, 10:24 PM   #24
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On my Dad's 28.5-foot sloop, a short chain with nylon rope for a rode made sense since the boat weighed only 4-tons (half of which was lead ballast). But when one is dealing with a ten-ton or more boat, a few hundred pounds is of little matter.
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Old 06-01-2013, 10:31 PM   #25
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My clutch loosened that day. I just needed to tighten it with that special wrench they gave me with the windlass, then no more issues since.
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Old 06-01-2013, 11:37 PM   #26
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Me? Two hundred feet of chain plus a 15 KG Bruce imitation still works for me.

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Old 06-02-2013, 12:40 AM   #27
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I probably shouldn't tell you guys what my main anchor system is but you'll enjoy making fun of me.

I have 300 feet of 1/2" three strand spliced to 25 feet of 1/4" stainless chain that is shackled to a 14 pound Delta. Remember my boat is small, about 9000 pounds, and I cruise in Biscayne Bay and the Florida Keys. I can usually find a pretty sheltered place to anchor. I have a twenty year old Lewmar Horizion 500 windlass that only let me down once. I love sitting up on the flying bridge, flipping a switch, and the rope, chain and anchor just come right up.

The stainless chain had a benefit I didn't expect, mud doesn't stick. It always comes up clean even when the anchor has ten pounds of mud stuck to it.
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Old 06-02-2013, 01:01 AM   #28
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Spy,

But they say under a heavy anchoring load the catenary is gone.

I'm just say'in the anchor does 5 to 15 times as much to hold your boat as the chain. So why not but your weight in the anchor?

But a buried chain should have quite a bit of holding power.
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Old 06-02-2013, 01:13 AM   #29
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Where I anchor, typically the current runs between two and three knots and reverses several times a day. So, it's essential the anchor "stays anchored" despite current changes. Often the chain has minimal/little-if-any catenary. (Bottom is heavy, sticky mud.) My 33-pound Bruce-knockoff works well under these circumstances.
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Old 06-02-2013, 01:13 AM   #30
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Spy,

But they say under a heavy anchoring load the catenary is gone.

I'm just say'in the anchor does 5 to 15 times as much to hold your boat as the chain. So why not but your weight in the anchor?

But a buried chain should have quite a bit of holding power.
I don't really disagree with you, in fact a combination rode makes the most sense to me for boats.

I'm just not a big fan of absolutes, and I like to discuss alternatives.

These are ships and not boats. Probably doesn't scale down well. Boat anchoring loads are shock loads, a spread mooring on a ship likely doesn't see the same loading.

The anchors I used were 2 meter concrete cubes, up to three blocks per chain. Chain was close to 100 pounds per link. Used kellets and pendant weights as well.
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Old 06-03-2013, 11:33 AM   #31
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Hey guys, I think your drifting a bit from John's question on how to replace a bad chain link

I too have the exact same problem with a severely compromised rusty link near the middle of my chain yet the rest of the chain does not have a spot of rust on it. Upon googling the issue using various search terms, it seems to be a surprisingly common occurrence and leaves me to wonder if these bad links are where the factory spliced the chain? I looked at the suggestions noted in this thread but also found this possibility called Marquip, LINKS AND SHACKLES and cursor down the page to Marquip. (couldn't figure out how to post the pic here). In any case, it seems to address all the issues raised. Has anybody tried this type of connector and can confirm it actually will feed through the winch? I wonder about the cross bar in the middle of this connecting link causing feed problems?
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Old 06-03-2013, 01:19 PM   #32
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The problem with the Marquip links is that the smallest one they make is for 3/4" chain.
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Old 06-04-2013, 12:57 PM   #33
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I would love to have Stainless chain, but man that stuff is expensive. When I checked the 5/16" was about $17.00 a foot.
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Old 06-05-2013, 12:29 AM   #34
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Thanks for all of the suggestions. I need to find out exactly where it is in the chain. If it is favoring one end, I will use one of the recommendations and also turn it around so it likely won't see much use. We generally don't anchor in anything over 20ft of water down here and it is sticky mud so the holding is usually decent.

Thanks again!!!
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