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Old 10-05-2013, 10:21 AM   #21
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I am now being told that my anchor is a Forfjord put on by the previous owner. He traveled to Alaska every summer fishing.



That is a great anchor and the primary on the Eagle. Most of the commercial fish trawlwe that go to Alaska have them and depend on them. It is not a quick set or short scope anch but it will hold. Requires 3 to 5 scope and all chain.
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Old 10-05-2013, 10:33 AM   #22
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So let me offers some opinions and reasons for them:

Whatever anchor you use it needs to be BIG. A Krogen 48 is a heavy boat with a lot of windage. So go up at least one size from the manufacturer's recommended size for your boat.

You can get by with 50' of chain and the rest nylon but I prefer all chain rode. No chafe breakage possibility, no keel wrap (really applicable to sailboats), the windlass pulls the whole rode up easily and the chain weight helps with holding.

You will need at least 3/8 HT chain for your boat. The maximum working load for that chain is about 5,500 lbs which is consistent with the holding power of a big anchor.

For total length of rode on board, take your maximum anchoring depth, add 5' or so for bow roller height and multiply by 6. You can get by with less than 6, down to 4 or so in tight anchorages with light wind. But go up to 7 for maximum holding power.

And of course you will need a beefy windlass to pull up a big anchor and its chain rode.

The newer designed anchors: Rocna, Manson Supreme, etc set very well, dig in deep (at least in mud or sand) and hold very well. They set much better than the equivalent sized CQR or Delta which are older designs.

I used a 55# Rocna when I cruised on a 35', 18,000 lbs sailing cat and anchored at least a 100 times one year. The Rocna always set first time, would reset when the wind or current shifted and when I finally pulled it up, it came up with a LOT of stiff soil, meaning it dug in deeply.

David
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Old 10-05-2013, 10:58 AM   #23
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When I was considering ordering a new fangled, whiz-bang modern anchor, the owner of a store in Prince Rupert listened quite patiently about new anchor designs, then nodded toward his extensive array of cheap galvanized Lewmar Claws and said, "Yeah, well, I get a lot of repeat customers".

I pondered that for a while, then bought the next size up Lewmar Claw that was already on our boat.

You just have to see any bay or estuary in this area at an extremely low tide to understand what he meant...there are stumps, root wads, logs, and/or whole trees laying on the bottom all over the place.

Still, I intend to get a modern storm anchor before we start exploring BC's north coast in the winter months, which should be next year, but it sure won't be used on a regular basis!
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Old 10-05-2013, 12:01 PM   #24
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Walt, maybe this would work better.

"fouetter un cheval mort"

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Old 10-05-2013, 01:50 PM   #25
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no keel wrap (really applicable to sailboats)

David
That one caught my eye, as I've never heard the term. What is "keel wrap"?
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Old 10-05-2013, 02:10 PM   #26
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That one caught my eye, as I've never heard the term. What is "keel wrap"?
I think that's where your rode wraps around your keel. We've had our rode on our stern anchor wrap around our prop when the tide changed. Also had a spinnaker sheet, and actually a spinnaker, get wrapped on our keel in our sailing days. Ah, good times.
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Old 10-05-2013, 02:12 PM   #27
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Conard, when the anchor rode gets wrapped/tangled around or on the keel. Can be a real problem if the keel has wings or bulges at the bottom usually on sailboats.

Yes Jennifer, I remember the good(bad) times sailing as well.
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Old 10-05-2013, 10:32 PM   #28
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Pan Pan re Sarca anchors. No, I'm not panning the anchors, far from it. Just that I have some information of importance re the above. As I have no pecuniary or personal interest in this whatsoever, (other than the fact I love these anchors), I think it is ok for me to pass on the following.

Rex of Anchorright has indicated to me personally, that it is ok for anyone interested in one of these anchors to contact him personally (look up 'contact us' on the website), and he is doing deals around the globe whereby, allowing for negotiation re discounts and shipping, you can have one of these shipped to you at a price is similar to what they are retail here in Australia.
That has to be a pretty good deal.
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Old 10-05-2013, 11:41 PM   #29
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"fouetter un cheval mort"
Very witty! I suppose one could "whip" a dead horse as opposed to Beating one.
(Oui, je parle un petit Francais!) (Sans doute mieux que Marin.)
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Old 10-05-2013, 11:51 PM   #30
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Thanks Jennifer and Mike. Never experienced a keel wrap in our sailing days. Never even thought about it, which is good, as there was/is always enough to worry about in the wee hours at anchor!!!
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Old 10-06-2013, 01:28 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by MurrayM View Post
When I was considering ordering a new fangled, whiz-bang modern anchor, the owner of a store in Prince Rupert listened quite patiently about new anchor designs, then nodded toward his extensive array of cheap galvanized Lewmar Claws and said, "Yeah, well, I get a lot of repeat customers".

I pondered that for a while, then bought the next size up Lewmar Claw that was already on our boat.

You just have to see any bay or estuary in this area at an extremely low tide to understand what he meant...there are stumps, root wads, logs, and/or whole trees laying on the bottom all over the place.

Still, I intend to get a modern storm anchor before we start exploring BC's north coast in the winter months, which should be next year, but it sure won't be used on a regular basis!

Murray,
Yup .... just like Marin you'd probably be fine w just a bigger Claw. What size Claw do you have? We both have boats the same size and I'd consider a 33lb Claw good for 99% of anchoring situations in your area. I bought a Claw when we went to Alaska on our previous boat thinking that design would be great on a rocky bottom. But my more recent experience has shown most bottoms up north are some variation of mud and rocky bottoms are somewhat unusual. The other advantages of the Claw you will also find a plus ... in your area.

But a 44lb Claw on our boats would probably take care of the other 10% and it's only 10lbs more ....

Another thought would be to use a Fortress as a primary and a Claw for rocky bottoms. A 23lb Fortress would probably hold us in an 80 knot gale and it would be easily hand launched and retrieved thus no winch would be required. Perhaps a 15lb Fortress would work just as well in 99% of our anchoring.

In other words we could anchor just like we anchored 22 and 25' boats w/o all the complication, weight and expense of most trawlers.
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Old 10-06-2013, 06:08 PM   #32
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Hi Eric,

We have the 10kg, (22lb) Lewmar Claw. That's not what we want for winter boating as I said earlier, but it's a huge improvement over the 7.5 kg (16lb) Claw that came with the boat and which is now our stern/backup anchor.

On Lewmar's chart they suggest the 10kg is good for 25' to 35' boats, so our 30 footer is right in the pocket for an 'everyday' anchor that will see most of the risk of getting hung up on some unseen gnarly old root wad laying on the bottom.

I figure with those two aboard, and a storm anchor, I'll feel better venturing into the deep corners of the complex waterways up here where you can go days without seeing another boat of any description.
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Old 10-06-2013, 10:49 PM   #33
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Murray,
My Claw is 22lbs also. I use it in river mouths and rocky spots where the chances of fouling and anchor loss is great and the weather is mild. An extra 22lbs would give us bullet proof 44lb anchors. And the size would impress even the ladies.

Most of the fishermen in SE AK that don't have a Forfjord or a Dreadnought are using Claws. They use really big anchors w lots of very heavy chain and anchor in tight places w very low scope. Don't recall ever seeing a modern anchor on Alaska fishing boat. They think a lot like FF.
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Old 10-07-2013, 12:29 PM   #34
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I am a new member and so impressed with the site and it's members. You have all have provided me with just what I was looking for, "experience" with anchors. I read all of your comments and appreciate you all taking the time to give me your experience. I noticed where you all are from as much as your comments. Our plan is to stay one more year in Puget Sound and then start south. Who knows where we will end up, our plan is to go south. Spent a few vacation bare boat in BVI. Look out here we come. We want an anchor that can go with us and I can sleep at night. So again thanks for the advice.
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Old 10-07-2013, 01:45 PM   #35
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Also here is a great link to an anchor study. One of the best I have found.
New Generation Anchors: Explained and Compared
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Old 10-07-2013, 03:27 PM   #36
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On Lewmar's chart they suggest the 10kg is good for 25' to 35' boats, so our 30 footer is right in the pocket for an 'everyday' anchor

While it might be fine for everyDAY , do you not plan on spending a NIGHT at anchor.?

For your boat in the wilds I would have a good brace of 35 lb + aboard , and they would be rigged with triplines , to increase the chance of getting them back aboard.

In the boonies triplines are worthwhile as anchor stores are a long walk.

In built up areas , harbors with dozens of boats and dozens of skill levels , the tripline gives a good visual of where your anchor is.
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Old 10-07-2013, 03:57 PM   #37
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Saying overnight overnight anchoring w a 22lb anchor is foolish is a ridiculous thing to say. I anchored in a very small inlet w a 13lb anchor. Two hours after we anchored it blew 30 to 35 all night long. A 22lb anchor for a 30' boat is not a lunch hook.

But for the 30' boat w a Claw 33lbs is better for " everyday". But a 22lb Claw should be fine up to 30 knots. Remember FF these are not very big boats.
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Old 10-07-2013, 07:25 PM   #38
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"Damn" Walt, Where do you obtain those wonderful statements?
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Old 10-07-2013, 10:26 PM   #39
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"Damn" Walt, Where do you obtain those wonderful statements?
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Old 10-07-2013, 10:32 PM   #40
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Also here is a great link to an anchor study. One of the best I have found.
New Generation Anchors: Explained and Compared
The author excites a lot of opinions in the boating world, and has been found wanting in some of his claims. I would look for a more impartial author regarding anchor comparisons.

This from a Rocna owner.
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