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Old 02-26-2011, 12:46 PM   #1
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Anchored in a Squall.

I have been caught once, anchored too close to shore and not paying attention got hammered by a Thunderstorm.** The anchor was well set and seconds*before it hit I increased the scope.

********** As the wind increased I realized the danger the nearby shore presented. It was only about a 20 minute event but did it howl.** The last ten minutes were spent with the engine running in forward gear with just enough throttle to take most of the strain off the rode.

********** I learned my lesson about afternoon T storms in NJ.**I doubt if this is standard procedure but I sure felt better about the situation.** Even if you do not approve keep this option in your bag of tricks if you can't get of the hook fast enough.

********** I didn't have a windless so raising the anchor in high winds*was not an option.

***********Was this a viable strategy for dealing with the conditions?

JohnP

-- Edited by JohnP on Saturday 26th of February 2011 02:17:41 PM
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Old 02-26-2011, 02:18 PM   #2
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RE: Anchored in a Squall.

John,
I have been it that position before in a predawn thunderstorm that lasted quite a while. I felt the ground tackle was sufficient- but like you- started my mains "just in case".
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Old 02-26-2011, 02:51 PM   #3
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RE: Anchored in a Squall.

Quote:
JohnP wrote:

Was this a viable strategy for dealing with the conditions?

JohnP

Absolutely.* Reducing the shock load on the chain is critical, by whatever means.* Plus it gives you something to do other than worry.

*
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Old 02-26-2011, 02:57 PM   #4
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RE: Anchored in a Squall.

Good way to go, as I have stated in a previous post that is not the time to go out , drop the snubber, let out more chain and
then try to get the snubber re installed.
Power upn and gently hold her into the wind and swell.
Get the Plotter on (large scale ) + the radar so you know you are staying in the one place. (night time, this is when it happens right!!)

Benn
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Old 02-26-2011, 03:17 PM   #5
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RE: Anchored in a Squall.

Quote:
Tidahapah wrote:

....drop the snubber, let out more chain and
then try to get the snubber re installed...
The stress level would be*high enough for me without trying to drop/reattach the snubber.* We always try to anchor with the worst conditions in mind.* Not always possible but we try.* We have 2 different snubbers.**We have a single with 50' of 3/4" nylon plus a yoke.**When we use the 50' snubber we*initially*use ~10' of it.* If conditions deteriorate we can put out another*35 feet of chain/snubber fairly easily and increase the*shock loading ability*of the snubber.* Given*the conditions*and situation you had, I won't have done things much differently.* It is amazing how fast sh.t happens.

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Old 02-26-2011, 03:54 PM   #6
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RE: Anchored in a Squall.

Quote:
Delfin wrote:

Absolutely.* Reducing the shock load on the chain is critical, by whatever means.* Plus it gives you something to do other than worry.


*

Delfin,* Doing something was a lot better then worrying for hours,----Oh right when I looked at the clock it was only 20 minutes.


JohnP
*
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Old 02-27-2011, 05:46 AM   #7
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RE: Anchored in a Squall.

Simply letting more line out on the snubber is easy.

Remember the storm may feel exciting , but will seldom put large strains on the anchor line IF it can stretch.

SO a good snubber should be really stretchy with only 1000-2000 of load.

3/8 for a 35 ft boat with perhaps 7/16 for a 50 ft will give the anchor the best relief from shock loads.


To fat a snubber line and toy night as well use steel cable!
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Old 02-27-2011, 06:28 AM   #8
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RE: Anchored in a Squall.

I always fire the engine up and jog in and out of gear as you did to help keep the strain off the anchor.
That way if somethiing were to happen either with my boat or another comming down on me I have a warm engine and I'm at the ready.
I have been in many tx storms and this has worked for me.
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Old 02-27-2011, 07:48 PM   #9
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RE: Anchored in a Squall.

Quote:
FF wrote:


Remember the storm may feel exciting , but will seldom put large strains on the anchor line IF it can stretch.


When*I anchor I really put the hook down good. Sometimes backing down to 1/2 throttle. So I know it 's set good. I anchor* when fishing and sometimes the weather can kick up. Once set I have rarely drug anchor.

*If you know your equipment. don't worry so much about it.

Be sure you have a good set.
Proper scope.
Start your motor if you must.
See what happens.

I Have been anchored between two Islands where the tide runs 5 knts. It looked like I was throwing a wake.*

Sorry but I just think you over reacted a little.

I always choose a safe anchorage.

If your anchor drags and you can't get it up.
*If you can see clear water. Drive to it.
Either you make it to the clear or your anchor will reset.
Either way you are off the rocks.


P.S. I use a combination rode 40 ft of chain 500 ft *5/8 nylon rode.

Never used an all chain rode so all this advice could be bilge water.


SD*
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