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Old 05-25-2018, 02:35 PM   #1
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Anchor Snubber

Hi All,
I havenít yet purchased or made an anchor snubber but found this on the boat. Iím assuming this is a version of one? If so should I use it or go with something different?
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Old 05-25-2018, 03:32 PM   #2
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Hell of a spring ya got there, not sure what that might be used for.
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Old 05-25-2018, 03:34 PM   #3
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Yes it is a snubber for anchor or line/chain to the dock.
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Old 05-25-2018, 04:01 PM   #4
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That could bang up the side of a boat pretty easily. I think there might be better options out there if that is actually a snubber or part of.
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Old 05-25-2018, 04:13 PM   #5
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Those kind of compression springs in a tension assembly tend to be noisy, too, as the tension members slide over each other. And they bottom out hard. There might be some use for it, but I wouldn't use it at the dock. Or at anchor either, for that matter.
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Old 05-25-2018, 04:15 PM   #6
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I`m thinking its too big for a snubber - that's a huge spring - nearly the size of an auto suspension spring - the force to compress that would pull most anchors.
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Old 05-25-2018, 04:33 PM   #7
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we dont know the strength of the spring....

it can be deployed underwater between lengths of line to minimize noise and potential damage....

a single unit aboard a boat, probably not used with dock lines unless the PO had a strange tie up.

I would try it after a few tests to see what its capabilities are.....
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Old 05-25-2018, 05:04 PM   #8
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It certainly looks...hmmm.. fireproof
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Old 05-25-2018, 05:08 PM   #9
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I've seen a similar snubber, but I don't think it was quite as large. I may have found it in the piles or extraneous boat stuff my Dad had.
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Old 05-25-2018, 08:10 PM   #10
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That certainly is an anchor snubber I've seen several of those not sure how it works worth is noisy. You already own it so why don't you try it
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Old 05-25-2018, 10:56 PM   #11
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I wouldn't use it on my boat. It has the capacity to do cosmetic damage to anything it touches, and it's energy absorbing ability is pretty limited, compared to a proper length of nylon line.
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Old 05-25-2018, 11:21 PM   #12
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I think the main purpose of the design is to sell for a large sum of money.
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Old 05-26-2018, 12:15 AM   #13
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I've seen those used at my old club. The marina was subject to some serious washes from tug boats and harbour ferries. Those springs saved the boats, lines, and docks from the shock of running out of travel.

By the time I joined a lot of people, including me, were using the rubber snubbers.

And of course the club got some serious wave breaks and attenuators.

But for many years the springs worked.

Never saw them used as anchor snubbers though.
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Old 05-26-2018, 02:24 AM   #14
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Its the sort of spring REAL trawlers have in their setup when dragging nets and parravanes.

For an anchor snubber use nylon rope with chain hook or knot of choice.
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Old 05-26-2018, 05:34 AM   #15
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Seems like they are more common than thought....quite a few sites selling them....

https://www.ebay.com/p/6mm-X-320mm-M...hor/1247489703

One of many......
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Old 05-26-2018, 06:45 AM   #16
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These are very common in the Med. Almost all marinas operate stern-to mooring with boats side-by-side and no finger jetties. Almost all boats in my local marina have them on the stern lines. They are available in a range of sizes to suit the size of boat. The laid mooring lines/bow lines are generally anchored by chains which also have a bit of give which reduces the pressure on the cleats.
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Old 05-26-2018, 08:28 AM   #17
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For anchoring stretch in the snubber is the requirement for the smooth noiseless ride

Nylon like stretching , BUT it takes 10% or 15% of the nylons breaking strength.

So the first snubber should be long , but not long enough to get in the prop,and probably 3/8 nylon to start.

This will give the smoothest ride , but should be changed for larger when the anchor chain or become taught enough to line rise clear of the water and jerk the boat.

Not very often in a protected anchorage .

Chafe is the thin line hassle,, rubber slip on guards work fine.
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Old 05-26-2018, 08:36 AM   #18
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They are used for dock ties, not snub lines for the reasons stated.
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Old 05-26-2018, 09:39 AM   #19
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The PO left a snubber setup on board. It has a plate with a chain slot and 2 shackles. The lines from the shackles each have a black mooring snubber on them. The black snubber provides quite a bit of stretch. So far it seems to work pretty well.
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Old 05-26-2018, 02:09 PM   #20
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That is a stout unit, but offers precious little in the way of travel, maybe a few inches? Stretchy rope much better IMO.
Might help if your rode is chain, could be added inline with a couple of shackles, and sent out a ways to keep it away from the boat.
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