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Old 05-02-2012, 07:38 AM   #81
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Old boat, new to us with a windlass that looks to me to be only able to handle rope-no chain. There is no chain on the anchor. Rope comes in to a pulley that has a deep groove built into it and the rope takes a path such that it is wedged into the pully as it transverses the pulley. It appears that chain wouldn't work. Did they make such a windlass back in the early 80's? 1983 Californian. Guess could put some chain on it and just hand haul it to the deck for the last 5 feet or so. Any thoughts? Most of the time the water depth will be 20 feet or less, but sometimes we go out to bottom fish in the gulf and the depth is 200 feet. We have had good luck with previous boats of getting enough anchor affect to hold us in positon for fishing. Most of the time sea state is pretty reasonable, else we wouldn't be out there.
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Old 05-02-2012, 07:50 AM   #82
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"Guess could put some chain on it and just hand haul it to the deck for the last 5 feet or so."

Great!! no chain to gypsy matching required.

Perhaps a chance to use bigger chain with the same strength as the nylon.

3/8 or 7/16 or better ,1/2inch could help the setting time .

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Old 05-02-2012, 10:05 AM   #83
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What always surprises me is the number of boaters I meet or read who don't attach a length of line to the end of their all-chain rode with the other end attached to a hook or eyebolt in the chain locker. The line should be stout enough to hold up under the shock of the chain accidentally running out and hitting the end of it, and long enough so that the line appears on deck when the chain is let all the way out.......If you have to abandon the anchor and chain you don't need to cut anything other than the line...... The only question is if I would have the presence of mind to attach a fender on a line to the end of the chain so we could come back and retrieve it later.
The above sound idea was precisely why I persevered in reversing my chain recently, even though I then had to sacrifice several metres of chain which was rusted by sitting in salt water in the bottom of the locker for years, in order to enjoy the nice newer-looking (galvanised) chain above it, and while doing so, I was able to set it up with this length of rope as Marin describes. It had always worried me I had the chain fixed in the locker. This new arrangement now not only serves as a quick release in an emergency, being easier to cut than chain, (something I can definitely confirm is not easy, after abandoning a new hacksaw and going over to an angle grinder, as I had to cut the swivel off to achieve the above. It is also more likely to come handy if rapidly running out more chain rode for some pressing reason, and if the end of the rode was reached unexpectedly the gypsy would disengage from the rope rode and just spin, instead of possibly tearing the chain out from its fix point. And yes, I now have a float ready to attach, too.

Manyboats wrote...
"I've seen sailboats enter an anchorage at 3 or 4 knots and when they think the time is right they drop the whole rode w a big splash. You can tell when the anchor sets as the boat stops abruptly."

I used to often do this in my yachting days, and still find it a useful way to anchor quickly if one is entering an anchorage from up-wind, as one can slow to a crawl, do a wee yaw to one side or the other so the chain avoids the hull, drop the anchor right where you want it in relation to other boats, flick it into neutral, then just drift down on the spot where you want to end up, letting the rode out as you go until enough is out, then letting the setting anchor pull the boat gently round into the wind and you are set. It's called the yachtsman's set I think. Works a treat...looks well...nonchalant, as the French would say...however not abrupt if going suitably slowly, Eric.
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Old 05-02-2012, 10:43 AM   #84
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Peter...............................
You're "yachting days??? What on earth do you think your doing now? Why do sailboaters seem to think sailboats are yachts and the rest of us are wannabes?
Sailboats are more yachtlike in that they can't be used in any other useful way but it seems sailboaters are trying to establish a pecking order and I do'nt like the order much. I'm of a mind that a far better method of powering boats has been developed and sails should be relegated to the has been antique world. I can see that small open sailboats can be fun and traveling the ocean may still be better done in a sailboat but the rest????
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Old 05-02-2012, 02:03 PM   #85
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Peter...............................
You're "yachting days??? What on earth do you think your doing now? Why do sailboaters seem to think sailboats are yachts and the rest of us are wannabes?
Sailboats are more yachtlike in that they can't be used in any other useful way but it seems sailboaters are trying to establish a pecking order and I do'nt like the order much. I'm of a mind that a far better method of powering boats has been developed and sails should be relegated to the has been antique world. I can see that small open sailboats can be fun and traveling the ocean may still be better done in a sailboat but the rest????
Did you really want to start a rant? Please don't get me started, too late, Damn it. Just why oh why are they so friggin arrogant. Oh the stories I can tell. This needs a new post. Oh and attaching a line to the bitter end of your all chain anchor rode, well that's just too obvious, who's going to do something that smart. I thonk I better check and see if my chains bitter end is even attached the eye in the chain locker. Thanks.
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Old 05-02-2012, 02:16 PM   #86
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Peter...............................
You're "yachting days??? What on earth do you think your doing now? Why do sailboaters seem to think sailboats are yachts and the rest of us are wannabes?
I can't speak for Australia but I've been to parts of the world where the term "yachting" specifically refers to sailing. In sailboats. Saying, "I'm going yachting next weekend" means that you're going sailing, usually in a fair-size sailboat. Running around in a sailing dinghy is not considered "yachting." But going out on a 40-foot sloop is.

Good friends of ours in England were for years co-owners of the 12 metre America's Cup challenger Sceptre. Sceptre had been "converted" for charter work. Converted in that it had more comfortable sleeping arrangements and a galley. Other than that it was still in its full racing configuration, and customers often chartered it for that purpose. It operated mostly around Ireland, northern England, and Scotland. And our friends always referred to their activities with the boat as "yachting." Not in a hoity-toity way with champagne glasses and hors d'oeuvres on the aft deck, but in a "we're going to do some serious sailing" sort of way.

So tems that mean one thing here can mean something entirely different someplace else.
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Old 05-02-2012, 04:44 PM   #87
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From a dim past of yachts (sailboats), that was the accepted way of anchoring without starting the engine ("the iron topsail"),if you had one. From memory you sailed downwind, dropped the anchor etc, waiting until it grabbed with an almighty jerk and the bow spun up into the wind.Now most yachts drop anchor "like a powerboat", though that itself allows for a range of methods. BruceK

The Maine cruise schooners (we call them "Cattleboats") drop the way you describe. They all carry the old kedge style anchor. Quite a nice cocktail time show watching and hearing a 100 footer ghost into the harbor, let go anchor and rattling chain, round up hard as it sets and drop the peaks on the gaffs.


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Old 05-02-2012, 08:10 PM   #88
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I can't speak for Australia but I've been to parts of the world where the term "yachting" specifically refers to sailing. In sailboats. Saying, "I'm going yachting next weekend" means that you're going sailing, usually in a fair-size sailboat.
Australia calls "yachts" what USA calls "sailboats". Boats propelled only by power are called "cruiser" or "powerboat" or sometimes at the high end, or by brokers, "motor yachts". Except for the "40ft speedboats" (cruisers half planing) passing/overtaking within about 20ft,which are called something else entirely. BruceK
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Old 05-02-2012, 08:21 PM   #89
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Scary wrote:
"Did you really want to start a rant?". No I did'nt and I almost did'nt post it. And I'm glad ...so far it's turned out the way it has.

Dwhatty,
I see those big Kedges and the interesting way they carry them on the bow. I'll bet if I carried a 65 or 75lb Kedge on Willy I'd never need to worry about anchoring again. And my total rode weight would be less than all chain. Think of the conversation piece it would be. When I got the anchor clear of the water I'd need a hook like thing to lift the fluke end of the thing up over the rail. I know where just about any size Kedge anchor can be purchased too. Galvanized. Thanks for the idea.........maybe.
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Old 05-03-2012, 06:41 AM   #90
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Why do sailboaters seem to think sailboats are yachts and the rest of us are wannabes?

Not wannabees , MARINE MOTORISTS !
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Old 05-03-2012, 07:02 AM   #91
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Marin wrote....
I can't speak for Australia but I've been to parts of the world where the term "yachting" specifically refers to sailing. In sailboats. Saying, "I'm going yachting next weekend" means that you're going sailing, usually in a fair-size sailboat. Running around in a sailing dinghy is not considered "yachting." But going out on a 40-foot sloop is.
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Australia calls "yachts" what USA calls "sailboats". Boats propelled only by power are called "cruiser" or "powerboat" or sometimes at the high end, or by brokers, "motor yachts". Except for the "40ft speedboats" (cruisers half planing) passing/overtaking within about 20ft,which are called something else entirely. BruceK
Thank you gentlemen, my case rests, as they say. Anyone for elevensies on the poop..??
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Old 05-03-2012, 11:26 AM   #92
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While your case is resting Peter I think a yacht is a pleasure boat, having nothing to do w the propulsion system. Sailing or powered dinghy's are yachts regardless of their size. To me a large or very large and luxurious yacht is much more of a yacht than lesser yachts. I do consider a very large and very luxurious power boat is the yachtyist of all yachts. I just consider sailboats to be sort of in the "also ran" category. I see them as a lesser vessel having such an inferior propulsion system and a hull designed/optimized for speeds unbecoming of more serious yachts. When the whim strikes the owners of the yachtiest yachts that yacht will whisk them along at a fairly high and sustained speed to reach the most treasured destinations in a timely manner in the greatest comfort possible.
Now there are sailing yachts so large (250' or so) w swimming pools and stabilizers and unimaginable luxury that they ought to invent a new word for them. That would be mega yacht I spoze and I'll bet most of their owners do'nt belong to a yacht club. I'll settle for trawlers, powerboats and sailboats....in that order. Just say'in.
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Old 05-03-2012, 01:03 PM   #93
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While your case is resting Peter I think a yacht is a pleasure boat, having nothing to do w the propulsion system.
What you say is true for you and for this country. But where people here think restricting the word "yacht" to sailboats makes no sense, the people in the countries that use the word this way think OUR definition makes no sense. Who's right?

Both of them in the context of their country, their language, and their traditions.

If I have learned one thing in the travels Boeing has sent me on around the world for the last twenty years we've been doing our international projects it is that this business of saying "we're right and they're wrong" when it comes to culture, customs, traditions, language, and approaches to life is total bollocks. Show the bottom of your foot to someone from the Middle East, particularly if you are IN the Middle East, or eat with your left hand, and that person will think on a very basic level that you are pond scum. They probably won't say or do anything to express that, but that's what they will think and it will color their attitude and dealings with you accordingly.

Whether you agree with it or not is irrelevant. It's part of their culture and if you expect to build any kind of productive relationship with the person, you better respect and adhere to what's important to them.

So, while using the term "yacht" to mean "sailboat" in this country is not part of the way we use the language, it is in other countries. And in the context of what they believe and how they speak, it's just as valid a use of the term as ours is.

The British and the Commonwealth countries think our use of the word "aluminum" is sloppy and ignorant. Everyone knows, after all, that the correct name of the metal is "aluminium."

Incidentally, when I'm in the UK (or Australia or New Zealand) I use the word "aluminium" if it comes up in conversation with the airline maintenance folks we're working with. I say "aluminum" in this country. I find it a lot of fun and very educational to adapt as many of the local or national expressions and terms as I can when I'm in another country.

Except for Marmite and Vegamite. Those are evil substances no matter what culture you're part of.

("Aluminium" is in the dictionary as the name for the metal right along with "aluminum.")
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Old 05-03-2012, 01:51 PM   #94
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Now I feel like narrow minded yankee pond scum.http://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/i...k/facepalm.gif
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Old 05-03-2012, 02:00 PM   #95
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Now I feel like narrow minded yankee pond scum.
No you're not. You used and defined a term as its used in this country. My definition of the word "yacht" is essentially the same as yours.

My only point is that I think it's important to acknowledge the validity of what people in another country or culture do, not dismiss them by saying they're wrong simply on the basis that what they say or do is different than what we say or do over here.
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Old 05-03-2012, 02:01 PM   #96
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Now I feel like narrow minded yankee pond scum.http://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/i...k/facepalm.gif
Gee, Eric, all because someone asked how long his anchor chain should be.
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Old 05-03-2012, 02:06 PM   #97
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Gee, Eric, all because someone asked how long his anchor chain should be.
Yes, but what is considered a long anchor chain in the US could be considered a short anchor chain in, say, Tierra del Fuego. And what about the people on Easter Island? What cultural perspectives might they bring to the question, "How long should my anchor chain be?"

See, I think Per has a lot of research to do before settling on how much chain he wants to buy for his anchor. To get a truly meaningful answer he's got to interview experienced mariners in every country with a seacoast. Ony then can he begin to approach the answer with meaningful data to work with.
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Old 05-03-2012, 04:43 PM   #98
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Gee, Eric, all because someone asked how long his anchor chain should be.

How long? Who knows? But, would you run out and get me a yard of flight line? And a bucket of prop wash while you're at it.

Ba-da-boom!
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Old 05-03-2012, 08:25 PM   #99
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Why do sailboaters seem to think sailboats are yachts and the rest of us are wannabes?

Not wannabees , MARINE MOTORISTS !
Those attracted to the title "Marine Motorists" will be excited to learn the Australian state of "New South Wales (aka NSW)" (why on earth did our forefathers call it that?) has merged "NSW Maritime" and "Roads and Traffic" into "Roads & Maritime".
Stand by for a uniformed Highway Patrol officer on a JetSki with siren pulling alongside your trawler regarding some offence. BruceK
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Old 05-03-2012, 08:32 PM   #100
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Those attracted to the title "Marine Motorists" ...
Attracted? I'm repelled by it. Marine Motorist, indeed. Bleh!
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