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Old 12-17-2012, 10:46 AM   #1
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Anchor Question

What style anchors do you use the most on lakes and rivers? I have a Danforth, a plow and a claw anchor. The danforth is no problem, I hang it from the rails. I only have 1 bow roller and can keep either the plow or the claw but not both. I just cant afford the room for both. Adding another bow roller is not practical and a 45 Lb. anchor is not the kind of thing I want to be carrying across the deck.
Which one would you keep?
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Old 12-17-2012, 11:18 AM   #2
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Claw no question for me. Stores best on the bow. Will grab and not release tree branches ect from the bottom of rivers and lakes least often. Danforths will bring up practically anything off the bottom and a plow ..............

I thought of a plow as a CQR. If it is I'd definitely make it the #3 anchor. Some people get along w them but there is way too much writing on the wall against them. I personally don't like the excessively long shank. And the articulated shank (hinge) I've never cared for. I'm not say'in it's totally bad but when nobody else uses the feature it's highly suspect to me. And it's a lot of weight for the blade area.

Now if the "plow" is a Delta or similar I'd drop the Claw and use that for a primary anchor. The only thing wrong w the Delta type is that ther'e holding power falls off (not the cliff but much more so than most other anchors) as you use or need a shorter scope. The Claw is best for that.

So if your Claw is over sized for your boat and your "Plow" is a CQR I'd make the Claw your primary.

If the "Plow" is like a Delta I'd make that your primary if you are going to be anchoring w a scope of 5-1 or more 90% of the time. This is probably the only high performance anchor you've got. But if your going to be anchoring at 4-1 scope or less half of the time or more (like me) the Claw is your best bet.
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Old 12-17-2012, 11:36 AM   #3
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What style anchors do you use the most on lakes and rivers?
Two questions--- What do the bottoms of lakes and rivers most commonly consist of, and what do the boats, particularly commercial boats, that typically anchor a lot on rivers and/or lakes use?

Armed with those two answers you'll probably have an easy time making your decision. They are the only things we'd need to know we're we in the same situation as you.
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Old 12-17-2012, 03:37 PM   #4
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I am used to anchoring in coastal areas and the danforth is used most often by me. I used the plow on occasion in weeds or grassy bottoms and have never used the claw.
The Danforth is not a problem - it hangs from the rail.
The Bruce style Claw is 33 Lbs and is sufficient for the boat.
The Plow is a 45# CQR. Way more than sufficient for the 36 Mainship. In my experience in the Gulf of Mex coastal area, the only drawback to the CQR is that it doesnt know when to stop digging in.
What do bottoms of lakes and rivers mostly consist of? I haven't got a clue. My original question was pretty much eluding to that. I was hoping that maybe some eastern waterway river rats would jump in and help me out.
My only real issue is not wanting to modify the bow pulpit or add an additional bow roller off-center.
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Old 12-17-2012, 05:28 PM   #5
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See the Fisherman on the bow in the pic to the left <<<<<
it is now a yard ornament and a 45# Delta is in it's place with a Danforth next to it on the rail. I have a oversize Fortress as a backup.

The Fisherman (Kedge) type nearly sunk a friends boat once when the wind shifted with a bit of surge and low tide all conspired, the boat came down on the upright fluke and holed his boat. There are better designs now.

Bottom type really matters in choosing whats best.
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Old 12-17-2012, 05:51 PM   #6
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Where does the 'generic' anchor fit into this equation?

Is the original Delta a superior anchor to say the newer Delta copies. The CQR's, which are everywhere in our part of the world,most are probably non genuine , so are the original designs that much different than the Chinese copies, leaving the Rocna issue to one side.
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Old 12-17-2012, 05:52 PM   #7
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Indeed yes. The bottom is the biggest variable in anchoring. Much bigger than any other variable.

I've come to the conclusion that most all anchors are fine and will provide adequate service. And the bottom being the biggest variable supports the idea (championed by FF) that carrying several different types of anchors are a good idea.

And SCOTTEDAVIS the Kedge is still one of the best anchors for very rocky conditions. Sounds like your friend was anchoring in EXTREMELY SKINNY WATER.
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Old 12-17-2012, 06:04 PM   #8
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Andy there's no perfect anything and every "knockoff" anchor could or even SHOULD be better than the original. I'll bet there's a Claw or 2 or 3 or more that's better than the Bruce and all these people out there paying big bucks for "genuine" Bruce used anchors may be shooting themselves in the foot.

And I'll bet Anchor Right's Ex-cell is better than the Delta but maybe not in every way. There's lots of anchors that are very very similar to the Delta and that in itself says or suggests the design is a good one.
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Old 12-17-2012, 07:03 PM   #9
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[QUOTE=manyboats;

"I've come to the conclusion that most all anchors are fine and will provide adequate service. And the bottom being the biggest variable supports the idea (championed by FF) that carrying several different types of anchors are a good idea."

I have no idea how far and wide the typical anchor forum member cruises. We typically stay in a pretty well defined area, that is, well over 90% of our boating is done in the same cruising ground year after year.

That area has a well defined geological sandstone base and sunken valley formation, so depending how far you venture up river from the coast, the typical combination of sea bed is a sand/clay mix in varying proportions.

My point is that, given the above, rather than carry anchors for all eventualities,do a little geological homework on your cruising ground and match your anchor to that.probably two anchors at most would cover the eventualities.

Having said that, I have no idea if my no name 44lb plough, which came with the boat, is up to the task if one night 'push came to shove' and it was really tested.
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Old 12-17-2012, 07:56 PM   #10
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Indeed yes. The bottom is the biggest variable in anchoring. Much bigger than any other variable.

I've come to the conclusion that most all anchors are fine and will provide adequate service. And the bottom being the biggest variable supports the idea (championed by FF) that carrying several different types of anchors are a good idea.

And SCOTTEDAVIS the Kedge is still one of the best anchors for very rocky conditions. Sounds like your friend was anchoring in EXTREMELY SKINNY WATER.
True they are very good in rocks but fair in sand depending on the fluke size (only engages the bottom).

Yes the intra-coastal area in Fl. can be quite shallow.
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Old 12-18-2012, 07:15 AM   #11
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so are the original designs that much different than the Chinese copies

The Chinese copies may duplicate the origional in "look" , but the low price point has two problems.

A FORGED anchor is far stronger than a cast iron copy.

This is especially true if the casting uses scrap iron, simply melted, not reformulated.

A anchor welded up of steel requires a better grade of steel, not likely with a price point Chinese copy.

A used anchor from an established mfg is the choice , for the budget folks, rather than recast scrap.
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Old 12-18-2012, 08:38 AM   #12
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What style anchors do you use the most on lakes and rivers? I have a Danforth, a plow and a claw anchor. The danforth is no problem, I hang it from the rails. I only have 1 bow roller and can keep either the plow or the claw but not both. I just cant afford the room for both. Adding another bow roller is not practical and a 45 Lb. anchor is not the kind of thing I want to be carrying across the deck.
Which one would you keep?
What country are you in Tony? Doesn't show up on the iPad.

If you're in Australia or New Zealand look at getting a Super Sarca or a Sarca Excel. That way you can piss both of the anchors you have and get one of these that actually work and at half of the weight

Peter B will back me up here!

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Old 12-18-2012, 08:41 AM   #13
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so are the original designs that much different than the Chinese copies

The Chinese copies may duplicate the origional in "look" , but the low price point has two problems.

A FORGED anchor is far stronger than a cast iron copy.

This is especially true if the casting uses scrap iron, simply melted, not reformulated.

A anchor welded up of steel requires a better grade of steel, not likely with a price point Chinese copy.

A used anchor from an established mfg is the choice , for the budget folks, rather than recast scrap.

Cheap anchors will work fine when you need them the least, when life and property are at risk is when they may fail.

A wonderful captain I know once said " a great anchor is the best sleeping pill ever invented".

You pay your money and make your choices.
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Old 12-18-2012, 08:46 AM   #14
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Cheap anchors will work fine when you need them the least, when life and property are at risk is when they may fail.

A wonderful captain I know once said " a great anchor is the best sleeping pill ever invented".

You pay your money and make your choices.
Very true. Nothin quite like sleeping with one eye open listening for the anchor drift alarm to go off to bugger up your night and following day lol

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Old 12-18-2012, 09:08 AM   #15
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Yes the intra-coastal area in Fl. can be quite shallow.
Now, there's an understatement! With 30' of chain it's possible to have an all chain rode.
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Old 12-18-2012, 09:54 AM   #16
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What country are you in Tony? Doesn't show up on the iPad. .....
I am in the USA. Texas to be exact, on the Gulf of Mexico
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Old 12-18-2012, 03:38 PM   #17
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In the Gulf Coast area around Galveston Bay, the Danforth is your go-to out of that selection. If weight is an issue get a Fortress. I've anchored for years in that area on my Krogen 42 and other boats with an FX-23 with no problems at all. Even held 6 other boats in Offatt's bayou on that anchor in a sustained maybe 15 knot wind. Forget the plow.
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Old 12-18-2012, 05:07 PM   #18
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Keith, I thought you had and used a Spade anchor.
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Old 12-18-2012, 05:20 PM   #19
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I have boated on the Tennessee ad Cumberland Rivers and they are mostly mud bottoms. I have a 75' Houseboat that captures a lot of wind. I have been using a F-37 Fortress for years with no chain and have been in some 20 mph gust with no problems. Probably not enough anchor, but it is enough for my back.
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Old 12-18-2012, 05:54 PM   #20
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Keith, I thought you had and used a Spade anchor.
I do, but that wasn't one of his choices.
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