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Old 10-12-2012, 07:40 PM   #21
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Buzz,
I'm not a fan of the Forfjord club. They seem to work fairly well and many to most fishermen almost worship them but I've never seen a small one on a boat. When I see a small one on a boat that has used it for years I'll take notice. My friend in Alaska that has a 30' Willard like mine has a 65lb Forfjord and is looking for a Dreadnought
I think one of the good features of the Forfjord is that in a wind direction change one fluke always stays engaged w the bottom so resetting isn't required but one might spend the night on only one fluke and it could be likely that most of the time only one fluke get's buried. With the Danforth that probably isn't possible.
Peter I think the Forfjord is definitely related to the Danforth. Take away the stock bar, make it much heavier and spread the the flukes apart quite a bit and you've got the basic Forfjord. Unlike the Danforth the Forfjord is very heavy for the amount of fluke area. If one is inclined toward heavy anchors bordering on the Navy types I think the Dreadnought is a better anchor but it's not easy to copy and they haven't made any for a long time. Actually I've never seen a Dreadnought copy and most are very rusty but re-galvanizing shouldn't be a problem.
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Old 10-12-2012, 08:01 PM   #22
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After I'd graduated college and was working in commercial television I once wrote a letter (on a typewriter) to one of my best friends who was then--- and still is--- a professor in theatre at Virgina Tech. The letter was about three pages long, single spaced. I used no capital letters, no punctuation, and put no spaces between the words. sothewholeletterlookedlikethisanditwentonforthreep agesandheandhiswifespentseveralhoursfiguringoutwha titsaid

My friend still has it.

Reading abbreviated or misspelled text is easy.

nfactitsntncssrytoinclallltrstomkitndrstndble
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Old 10-14-2012, 11:15 PM   #23
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Buzz and Eric I should perhaps have qualified my 'Danforth type' statement a bit. I suspect you both knew this but to clarify...I call any anchor with two flukes joined and hinged horizontally at the end of the shank, and with angled flanges attached to the flukes where they are joined opposite the end of the shank, that deflect the flukes downwards, whichever side they end up lying on, Danforth types. Of course it could be argued the Danforth is just a modified dreadnaught or ships anchor - it they had a name I don't know it, but they all look rather variations on the dreadnaught theme anyway.
The issue there is they are vulnerable to skidding along the surface if the substrate is firm or weed-covered, and possibly a bit slow to reset with a large angle of pull change. However, on a vessel large enough to handle a heavy one - of any of these so-called Danforth/Dreadnaught/Forfjord/Fortress types - much of that is academic, I suspect.
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Old 10-15-2012, 12:36 PM   #24
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Oh yes Peter,
I forgot about the "pads" or "ramps" at the center of the anchor opposite the skinny end of the flukes that lift that end of the anchor that gives the flukes their angle of attack. Setting is probably fairly to mostly dependent on that as all these anchors (Dreadnought, Forfjord, Navy and Danforth) have that feature.
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Old 10-15-2012, 01:39 PM   #25
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Several months ago, I took a walk around the marine and count the different anchors depending on the size/kind of the boat. The anchors reported to set fast/well have a sharp point and/or the edges narrow sharp, which may attribute to their setting. As you can see the 45+ ft commercial prefer the #8 or #12 Forjord, and start showing up on the pleasure.

The ramp and angle of the flukes, is a good point as the anchors that set fast also have a steeper angle so they dig in. I have seen some Forjords modified making the flukes wider/bigger, but have not taken note of the pads. Looks like I need to take another walk.

We only have a #6 or 65 lbs, would like to have a #12 or 145lbs. However, because of the windless and having all chain may have to settle on the #8 or 93 lbs.


Originally Posted by Phil Fill
I took a walk down the Everett marine dock looking at what anchors boats have. This is the results:

Power 40 to 45 ft

Bruce 9

Danforth 3

Delta 1

Maxuim 3


Sail 40 to 45 ft

Bruce 2

QCR 4


Power 45+ ft.


Bruce 5

QCR 4

Danfoth 4

Forjord 2

Maxium 5

Ronoc 1


Sail 45+ ft

Bruce 2

QCR 7


On the commercial dock


Under 45 ft

Bruce 6

Danfoth 2

Forjord 2


Over 45 Ft

Forjord 7

Bruce 2



I took a walk 10+ years ago so we have three anchors – QCR, Danforth and a Forjord. The QCR was the primary anchor when we bought the boat. However, I found the QCR dragged, so I changed to the Danforth. Being I moored and tend to follow the commercial boat, I bought a Forjord which is the now the primary.


We have the chain/line/windless to deploy two anchors in need be. Many boats over 50 had to anchors a CQR/Bruce and Danforth/Forjord. I believed the anchor is dependant on the kind of bottom. Rock/Hard – Bruce/QCR mud/sand/soft – Danforth/Forjord.

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Old 10-16-2012, 01:01 AM   #26
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Phil Fill, Good post. I have found that your choices are similar to mine.
I have never had any trust in the CQR after my negative experience for some
three years using it here in AK. To a lesser degree the same applies to the Danforth.
I use a 110# Bruce for stern anchor and an (approximately) 140 # Forfjord (#12) on the Bow. 600 feet chain in the bow and 400 in the stern, Never a problem. Buzzard
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Old 10-16-2012, 09:24 AM   #27
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600 feet chain in the bow and 400 in the stern, Never a problem. Buzzard
I would guess not. Most of the time you could just lay out the chain and not need the anchor.
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Old 10-16-2012, 09:28 AM   #28
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600 feet chain in the bow and 400 in the stern
Mr. T's boat?

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Old 10-16-2012, 03:03 PM   #29
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JD, RAMBLER, It seems apparent you haven't lived on anchor during the winter in SE Alaska. Winds are commonly 40-45 knots and at least 3 to 4 times a year rise to storm force. We have spent nights at anchor when the winds were exceeding 100 knots and we didn't feel that we had too much rode or anchor. These bays are often quite large and the waves can be counted on to cause pitching and rolling sufficient to telegraph significant motion to all your ground gear. Chain alone? I think not. Buzzard
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Old 10-16-2012, 06:06 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by ARoss View Post
Reading abbreviated or misspelled text is easy.

nfactitsntncssrytoinclallltrstomkitndrstndble
thhumnmindcnintrprtmostnythng
Gee, that was easy! In fact its not necessary to include all letters to make it understandable the humman mind can interpret most anything.

On PMM years ago they use to give me such a hard time about my spelling as I spell the way it sounds. That is how I got the name Phil Fill as they both sound the same. As you can see when I use the note pad without spell check its harder to read, but it seems most can muddle through!

So what were we discussing something about boats and big heavy metal things?

Not many boats can carry that much chain. Do you have a picture of your motor sailor? You anchor out year around?

We have 200 ft with another 200 ft of rope. Looking at the water line we could carry maybe another 100 or 200 ft. Next time we pull I am having several above water thru hulls move up 3 to 6 inches, along with the boot strip as we continue adding weight.
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Old 10-16-2012, 10:54 PM   #31
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Reply to: Do you live on anchor year round?

We have lived on our boat since 1983. Nearly all that time was in
Alaska and there are almost no places in SE Alaska where we haven't
hung our anchor.
We consider all the time we are on a dock to be wasted time. Most often when that occurs we are maintaining the boat or for personal health.

We have seen astonishingly fierce storms and always striven to never
see another. The weather reports some years ago were not very accurate but have dramatically improved since. Our horrible weather experiences have become less frequent as a result.

That being said, I haven't been trying to sell anyone on my anchor system. Rather, I had thought that this forum was looking for the experiences of others to help all have a better perspective of anchoring in general.

I am quite satisfied with my anchoring but realize others might not find it appropriate for themselves. buzzard
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Old 10-17-2012, 12:39 AM   #32
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Bigger is Better ?

Buzzard,
And you think you're 140# anchor is big. This Navy anchor is 500#.
Took this pic after some guys on the float in Craig told me about a guy w a 500# anchor. We were in a discussion about how big was big enough. We were aboard a 30' Willard that had a 65# Forfjord. I said and thought that if the anchor was any good he should'nt need a 65 pounder. I was say'in that was overkill and they said the'd show me overkill ... and they did.
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Old 10-17-2012, 11:47 AM   #33
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We are planning to anchor more as we head further north with less marinas. We have not anchor very often and only on calm warm summer days. Being we are not of the bald/silver haired crowed yet, and being 58 ft we usually have to anchor in 50+ ft as the shallow more protect anchorage are taken. If the windless could handle a 100+ lb anchor and all chain we would have one, but I do not want to over strain the windless as a new one cost 2 to 3 grand. If I was to replace the windless it would be with a hydraulic drum like most commercial have.

Different brands/kinds of anchor are better for different bottoms, so we carry a plow QCR and navy Danforth/Forjord anchors. Certainly scope is a major factor so the pull is straight and not at an angle up. So I am very interest in what works in the PNW, and so far the Forjord with all chain seems to be the answer. However the new Ronoc with its roll bar looks interewting. I took a walk and noticed that many have a pipe weld to the front plate to make it higher so the flukes dig in more of any angle, and some of the flukes where wider. You can see that 500# has been modified. Any suggestions, I would be interest in hearing.

It took me a long time to understand why anchoring on the East cost is more popular. The reason is the water is shallow and the tide is a few ft. The PNW water is deeper/thicker, falls off quickly, and the tide swings are 10 to 20 ft. So what ever the depth is I add 15 ft. So we need at least another 100+ ft of chain.

I would be ecstatic if we could anchor in 10 to 30 ft of water most of the time.

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Old 10-17-2012, 12:20 PM   #34
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Phil Pill,
You wrote: "You can see that 500# has been modified." There are subtle differences in Navy anchors but I fail to see where this one has been modified and I'm the one that took the picture.

The best anchor for you could be the Manson Ray. It's quite expensive but is not cast like other claws. There was a test done comparing the Ray to the Manson Supreme and the Rocna some time ago and the Ray outperformed them both. Also it was shown to have good short scope performance ... definitely better than the other two. Because you have a heavy boat does not mean that you need a heavy type anchor ... it does mean that you need high holding power. And since you have a big boat a heavy type anchor means you'll need a very heavy anchor so a lighter "type" anchor w high holding power could be much lighter and easier to stow and handle. Also dependability could or should be even more important than holding power. If you can stow it gracefully on your bow the SARCA very likely (probably) will be even better than the Ray.

Here is the test link:
http://www.manson-marine.co.nz/Ancho...or%20Tests.pdf
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Old 10-17-2012, 01:34 PM   #35
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I would be ecstatic if we could anchor in 10 to 30 ft of water most of the time.
The only time we ever put out more than 100' of line on anchor was when we were in over 100' of water, generally over a dive site. Otherwise the shallows where you anchored for the night were closer to 10' to 15'. Depending on the conditions, wind mostly, you'd have 50' out, max.
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Old 10-17-2012, 06:22 PM   #36
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JD, RAMBLER, It seems apparent you haven't lived on anchor during the winter in SE Alaska. Winds are commonly 40-45 knots and at least 3 to 4 times a year rise to storm force. Buzzard

Chill out there Buzz. Did you not see the happy face. And no I have never been to Alaska nor do I want to anchor out in 100 MPH winds. If I did I can do that right here in NC and at least the temperature would be above 75*.

Next thing your gonna tell us is you have a Blue OX as a pet. (Notice the happy face) Maybe you do.
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Old 10-18-2012, 11:01 AM   #37
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Look at the very front of the 500# anchor where a round pipe looks to have been welded angle plate. I notices the same modification on some of the Forjords. It seems to me if a high/tall round bar was welded to the, QCR, Bruce, most anchor would benefit. Also did you notice how pointed the tip and sharp the edges are. on the Ray, supper and Rocan?

The three anchors in the test and recommend for the Eagle are 110# to 130# which is not much lighter then the 145# Forjord. So I don’t see where they are significantly lighter also the test was done in rock/stone which a plow would be better, QCR/Bruce/Rocna/Ray/Mason. That is why some boat have both kinds of anchors, plow and navy.

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Old 10-18-2012, 12:07 PM   #38
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I don't see the mod Phil. Here's a better look. I notice that the shank is square like a Forfjord and don't recall if that is true of most Navy anchors.

When I talked of lighter types I'm referring to something more like a Fortress that has a very high blade area to weight ratio. Once an anchor is set blade area is almost directly proportional to holding power. Anchor weight is basically to get the anchor set. Navy anchors, Forfjords, Dreadnoughts and Claws have a very small blade area per pound and are thus very inefficient. So if a 75# Rocna is right for your boat (weight/holding power wise) then you may need a 225# Forfjord to be able to hold your boat as well.
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Old 10-18-2012, 12:13 PM   #39
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Forjord Anchor

I am releatively new to anchoring in the PNW (2 summer now) on our 45 boat. Most of the time we are on the hook in coves ranging form 30-60ft of water. We spend ~80 days on the hook somewhere. I have read almost ever article concerning type, placement, limitation of the current anchor available to us boater.

Having said this, I have paid attention to what other boaters have hanging from their pulpid, observe their setting technique and most of all the holding of said anchor.

I have personally not lost anchor set but have only experienced 30-40 kt wind with ~ 4ft swell. I always have at least 3:1 if not more depending on swing room. I always listen to the weather report for wind direction, speed and if an antisipated wind direction change will happen while I am asleep.

I have spent sereral night/morning on anchor watch because I was awaken by unexpected wind change and velocity.

I am very happy with the 65# Forjord that I set. I have 210 ft of 3/8" chain and 210' of rope.

And again I have learned more about anchor types and techinque thanks to experience on this forum.
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Old 10-18-2012, 12:57 PM   #40
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Well according to the chart that is on their web page. Winter weather anchoring, up to 40' a #4 (40#), up to 45' a #6 (65#), up to 55' a #8 (95#), up to 65' a #12 (145#), up to 90' a #18 (210#).

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