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Old 09-09-2018, 10:49 AM   #1
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Anchor Chain Noise

Has anyone come up with a method that will either eliminate or reduce noise from an all chain rode?
Background: We use an all chain rode (unless anchoring in very deep water when we have to go into the rope portion of our total rode), and to take the stress off of the windlass, we use a "U" shaped chain hook that has attachment points for 2 lines (so it is a bridle with a single chain hook). The bridle is cleated off to port and starboard bow cleats so it does not go over the bow roller. After 2 seasons with this setup, the hook has not accidentally "fallen off", so all is good there. However, we often hear a fairly loud noise in the forward berth (master cabin) as the boat moves even in a relatively calm anchorage where tidal current is the reason for the movement! I am a light sleeper, and this happens enough that I often move to the salon to sleep. Very annoying
I am not sure if the noise comes from the chain hook attachment, the chain dragging over a rock in the mud bottom, or from some other cause, but I find it hard to believe that I almost always find the one rock down there (if that is the most likely cause).
So, just wondering what other boaters have found to solve or help with this issue.
Thanks,
Tom
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Old 09-09-2018, 11:03 AM   #2
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Definitely the chain dragging over rocks. Even with an anchor bridle that takes the load off the chain, the chain links are still touching and transmitting the sound. The bridle eliminates only the noise over the anchor roller and helps with scope.
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Old 09-09-2018, 11:15 AM   #3
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Anchor Chain Noise

Could be rocks or chain on chain if you don't back down and lay the chain out on the bottom. Could end up in a pile maybe? You have a pic of your setup? Chain secure in the roller? dropping enough chain down to create slack on chain and all the pressure has been transferred to the legs of the bridle?
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Old 09-09-2018, 11:47 AM   #4
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After you add the bridle/snubber do you then drop a section of chain down "behind" the attachment point so that the chain is just hanging loose?
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Old 09-09-2018, 12:42 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by menzies View Post
After you add the bridle/snubber do you then drop a section of chain down "behind" the attachment point so that the chain is just hanging loose?

^^^ This ...

We anchor a LOT. We use a chain hook that has a nylon lead to each hawse cleat as a bridle. The chain comes from the anchor to the hook, then has a loop hanging down over the hook, then the chain rises to the bow roller and the winch. Occasionally in calm water when the boat moves around, the looped chain travels against itself and makes noise. I found that rigging a tie back just under the bow roller on the section of chain that comes up to the boat from the hook- changes the geometry just enough to prevent the chain from rubbing on itself. It's an extra line to rig, but it effectively stops the rattling. In stronger current or wind, it's not an issue since the chain isn't hanging straight down from the bridle.
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Old 09-09-2018, 12:52 PM   #6
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I have a long single 1" nylon bridle I tie to the windlass. I let out the bridle line to about the water line (about 7' from the bow roller) and let out chain for a loop that goes below the water line. I don't seem to get chain noise. In a heavy swell or strong wind I get nylon stretching noises.
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Old 09-09-2018, 01:01 PM   #7
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We have a chain snubber that is like the OPs. Have not noticed any chain noise at anchor but we do sleep in the aft cabin.
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Old 09-09-2018, 01:38 PM   #8
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Tom:

Releasing enough chain so there is a bight of chain hanging down at least 1 ft from the boat side of the hook usually is enough to eliminate the Gronch. I use a hook similar to yours.
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Old 09-09-2018, 02:03 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maerin View Post
^^^ This ...

We anchor a LOT. We use a chain hook that has a nylon lead to each hawse cleat as a bridle. The chain comes from the anchor to the hook, then has a loop hanging down over the hook, then the chain rises to the bow roller and the winch. Occasionally in calm water when the boat moves around, the looped chain travels against itself and makes noise. I found that rigging a tie back just under the bow roller on the section of chain that comes up to the boat from the hook- changes the geometry just enough to prevent the chain from rubbing on itself. It's an extra line to rig, but it effectively stops the rattling. In stronger current or wind, it's not an issue since the chain isn't hanging straight down from the bridle.

Thanks for the suggestion Steve! Using the "extra" line, do I need to "take the weight of the chain loop" onto the line (chain loop between the bow roller and where the chain hook attaches)?
As far as the questions asked by other posters:
Yes we start backing down on our anchor shortly after the anchor is on the bottom. We lower the anchor using the windlass, not by just "letting her go". We let out enough chain after the bridle is on to ensure that all the weight is on the bridle and there is a loop of chain hanging from the hook. We also "set our anchor" (gently and gradually) by ensuring that we back down enough that the chain "comes out of the water" and once set, we still back down in gear for a minute or so to ensure we are not dragging and are well set. Sorry, I don't have any photos of my setup, but it is actually pretty simple with a line running from the "u" shaped anchor hook up to bow cleats on each side of the boat creating a "Y" shape if looking from the anchor back to the boat with the anchor hook usually being underwater by several feet.

Next year, I may experiment using a single line attaching with an icicle hitch to see if that makes a difference.
Thanks for the responses, and if anyone has more to add, great always open to ideas.
Thanks again,
Tom
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Old 09-09-2018, 03:51 PM   #10
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Sounds like our set up.I liked the "lazy loop" behind the chain plate to extend several feet below the water surface. That added additional weight for the boat to lift as it came back, for one thing. No one in the forward cabin complained of chain noise, though in a blow you could sometimes hear the line stretch. In our aft master stateroom, of course, it was silence.

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Old 09-10-2018, 12:29 AM   #11
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We seem to get noise only when the boat changes position and the chain that is lying on the bottom has crossed over itself. If the boat reverses and pulls the chain off itself, the noise goes away. If we get tired of hearing it, we could start the engine and pull the chain straight. This gets rid of the noise unless the boat again changes position and the chain lying on the bottom crosses over itself again. While it is happening, we usually just accept it.
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Old 09-10-2018, 06:19 AM   #12
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As already noted, forward berth sleeping is noisier. Do you find less noise in a muddy or sandy bottom like Newcastle Is or Tribune Bay vs say Desolation areas which are more glacier scoured?

I've found success when hearings aids are removed. Finally, a benefit to growing older!
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Old 09-10-2018, 08:00 AM   #13
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Once youíve isolated your chain from all metal to metal contacts the only thing that can make that noise is the chain itself. Sometimes the chain will get a half twist in it from a tide or wind shift. Iíve also seen three strand snubbers wind themselves into the chain bight making considerable racket on boats near us on windy days.
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Old 09-10-2018, 08:45 AM   #14
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It happens. I don't know that there is anything you can do about. It's kind of like waves lapping on the hull. Or in windy conditions, waves banging on the hull. You just have to get used to it.

I would just persevere. More exposure over time and your mind should start to tune out those noises. I would suggest you stop moving to an alternate bed and force yourself to be exposed to it. Do this long enough and you sit awake noticing its absence.
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Old 09-17-2018, 12:57 PM   #15
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U

Hi,


We have the same boat (Nordic Tug 37)



I found a relatively easy fix...

I added a length of stretchy rubber (an Anchor ‘Shockle’) to our Mantus Bridle. (between the chain hook and the end of the bridle.) This has largely eliminated the transfer of most of this anchor chain noise into our master stateroom.



Getting rid of the Chine slap was a lot more work.





-evan


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Old 09-17-2018, 01:44 PM   #16
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I've always assumed that the noise we hear once in a great while, similar to what you describe, is caused by the boat touching the chain as the tidal current changes. Still believe that is probably the cause since I cannot imagine how sound from chain dragging over a rock could travel up the chain, through the "loop," over the bow roller, down the hawse, and into the boat in such a way as it would produce a sound in the boat. There's a lot of scope out that becomes very loose and dangles from the bow pulpit as the boat is moving over the anchor with the tidal current change.
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Old 09-17-2018, 02:05 PM   #17
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Hi BobMc


In our local waters ( WestCoast BC) with lots of rock around, the grinding chain noise is indeed transmitted through the chain. It's loud and intermittent enough to make a mess of one's attempts to sleep. It is not from the chain striking the boat. A nylon stretchy bridle will attenuate the sound somewhat but insulating the boat from the sound is a challenge.



As above, our solution of adding a heavy duty shockle to the end of the bridle has worked very well.


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Old 09-17-2018, 03:01 PM   #18
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I also use a Shockle with LineGrabbers to relieve pressure on the gypsy and eliminate many noises. I use the LineGrabbers between my pulpit cleat and a chain link. They're spec'd for up to 2000 lbs.

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Old 09-17-2018, 04:01 PM   #19
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I found that using a 6-to-1 scope of rode tied off with @10' of 1" nylon snubber attached to the chain with a rolling hitch works well. About the only time I get any chain noise is when the wind picks up or shifts significantly which is probably a good time to get up and check things out anyway.
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Old 09-17-2018, 06:30 PM   #20
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Our boat waggles (sails?) back and forth a good bit at anchor in a brisk wind. The chain going from side to side over the bow roller makes a noise we can hear in the midships master cabin. (Mantus chain hook, two snubber lines thru forward hawse holes to cleats, nice long loop in the chain btwn bow roller and chain hook.)

We got a 2' long length of heavy duty rubber hose with an ID large enough to easily go around the chain. Split it open lengthwise. Once the chain is played out, we slip this hose over the chain and slide it down so the chain isn't actually in contact with the bow roller. Helped a LOT with the chain-on-roller noise!
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