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Old 07-19-2017, 06:48 PM   #1
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Anchor Chain Joiners

I`m looking at replacing my 3/8-10mm chain. For reasons of handling,the gal chain usually comes in 50kg/22M lengths, so I need to join them. Joiners are essentially a split link in 2 parts you attach between the two ends. You effectively rivet the joiner by hitting the "rivets" with a hammer.
Question: Do I use ss or gal joiners? I prefer gal underwater for its malleability, but bashing the rivets with a hammer won`t help the galvanizing, so I`m minded to go ss. Thoughts?
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Old 07-19-2017, 07:29 PM   #2
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I would use the gal. The small amounts of zinc lost by the hammering will be covered by the anodic effect of the surrounding zinc.
If the link corrodes after a few years, just chop it out and replace.
If you use stainless there may be a risk of interaction between that link and the rest of the chain.
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Old 07-19-2017, 07:38 PM   #3
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I agree with D.Duck44, but is this BBB or G4 chain? If BBB then the connecting link should work and have adequate strength. But if it is G4 look at this response from 1st Chain Supply:

.Is there a connecting link avaiable to join two pieces of chain and still work on my windlass?
. I'm afraid no one makes a repair link like that. You can get connecting links that are very "close" in size but only half the strength of Gr40 chain. You can get links that are as strong as Gr40 chain but they are so big as to be virtually unusable on your windlass. When the link comes out of the water someone needs to be on the windless to muscle the link around the gypsy so as not to cause damage. Sorry

Talk to 1st Chain Supply. There has to be a way of getting a continuous length of chain without a link.

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Old 07-19-2017, 07:49 PM   #4
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Bruce, I used galvanized 7 years ago and to be honest, it looks as good today as the day I beat the hell out of it with a hammer. Granted, I anchor in fresh and brackish water a lot, but I also anchor regularly in salt water.

The links are cheap enough that I just bought two with the intent of replacing #1 when it started looking different. I keep a tie wrap on it at my 90 ft marker and check it out regularly throughout the year. So far, so good.

I found having a heavy steel plate (or an anvil) makes peening the link more effective and predictable. Having a good flat hammer matters, too.
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Old 07-19-2017, 09:27 PM   #5
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Well, 'only as strong as the weakest link' etc. I suggest you call Brian at Ocean Solutions.
Anchoring Equipment :: Calibrated Windlass Chain :: CMP DIN766 Calibrated Windlass Chain :: 10mm (P28) DIN766 G30 Calibrated Windlass Chain

Buy either half drum (55m) or full drum (110m) to get a much better price. They have a bunch of re-sellers.
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Old 07-19-2017, 10:51 PM   #6
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Here's a link to an earlier discussion. I used the Crosby Missing Link.

Bad chain link
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Old 07-20-2017, 12:19 AM   #7
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Handling 100-200kg of chain in one package is tough, it has to get delivered at home(the marina guys "work"limited/unpredictable" hours), I have to get it to the marina by car, down the walkway, and handle it. So I need to join 50kg lengths.
I have a sample ss joiner link, only markings are the obvious, "316",and "3/8", I`ll check it against a real link. It looks well cast.Made in Thailand, guess that`s better than the usual suspect.
The commonly accepted short link chain grade here is "L" which complies with an Australian standard for lifting. That`s what the marine shops sell, I`sure there are better qualities in chains but I`m comfortable using the standard, and I hope not to have this boat forever.
I don`t think there is an ss vs gal (on steel) issue, I remember once asking about that and getting ridicule. The gal pins might flatten better than harder ss, and have worked well for Al. Our usual marine shop only has ss, I`m sure I`ll find gal if I go looking.
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Old 07-25-2017, 07:27 PM   #8
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No technician, stevedore, rigger or engineer I know would use a "joiner" to increase the length of a chain, especially if safety is an issue. A chain is only as strong as it's weakest link. I'd purchase a shot of chain in the desired length and sleep well while at anchor.
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Old 07-25-2017, 09:04 PM   #9
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I doubted it, too, but decided to give it a try under relatively benign conditions here in the CA Delta. Then I started anchoring in the SF Bay and it worked well.

Then it all got battle-tested on the SF Bay during the Blue Angels Fleet Week Show when a 60' Hatteras landed on my bow like a pickle on a fork. We remained entangled in the slot W of Alcatraz in 15-20 Kt winds for what seemed a minute before I could safely release the rode from the pulpit cleat. That anchor, rode and pulpit held and and the rode looks just fine.

But then again, my system was only designed to hold my boat at only 18,000 Lbs (I thought!). I later found out it weighs 24,000#. Others here are MUCH larger and adding a link would not be a safe option.

If I were to do it all again from the start, of course I wouldn't have the link. But given attention, it an be a reliable alternative to starting over again.
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Old 07-25-2017, 09:17 PM   #10
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Lighter and stronger w a combination rode.
I'd recomend "Brait" for the nylon end.

And Bruce, you can make your rode longer at the same time as one can probably get nylon line in long and various lengths.
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Old 07-25-2017, 11:06 PM   #11
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After some thought,probably going with 80M of chain no joins, and around 20M (or what will fit) of nylon. Still working on getting the chain down the marina walkway, turns out it is 5/16(8mm), which helps. The Admiral, master of the splice,is training on chain/rope splicing(youtube).
Don`t be too critical of joiners. Al had his joiner under surveillance essentially because of the galvanizing, and we know it has been well tested with a boat 25% over assumed weight, in arduous conditions.
I`ve not seen brait advertised here and a search was none too productive. I`m thinking 14mm nylon, and I think it should go through the gypsy. With 80M of chain(260ft) the nylon will mostly get wet from the chain draining on top of it.
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Old 07-25-2017, 11:25 PM   #12
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Bruce, Brait (capitalized b/c it's a brand name) is sometimes called plait.

Marine 8 Strand Plaited (By the Foot)

My only caution is that it's a little slipper in the gypsy for its size. I was advised to upsize my Brait from 9/16 to 5/8 with my 5/16 chain on a Lewmar 1000 windlass.

(sorry for the US measurements. You'll have to do the math . )
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Old 07-26-2017, 12:23 AM   #13
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Al, thanks. 5/8" converts to 15.8 mm. So either 14 or 16 mm, I can check with Muir, Maxwell`s site says 14mm for 5/16 chain gypsy. Main focus still is getting the chain down the marina, someone suggested hauling the boat and getting the chain to it(using the battery charger flat out), seems overkill. Maybe I can hire a gorilla.
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Old 07-26-2017, 05:19 AM   #14
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Bruce, I think our chain here is all metric. My chain was short link 10mm, which I think is closest to 3/8th in the imperial measurements. I wouldn't think your 36 ft boat would need heavier chain that that. What link diameter is the current chain..? I'd be surprised if it's more than 10mm link thickness.
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Old 07-27-2017, 12:44 AM   #15
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You are right Peter, all chain is sold here is sized in mm. 10mm=3/8; 8mm=5/16. I thought mine was the former but no, it`s the latter, 8mm.
As the chain developed no gaps or holes over 7 years of ownership and regular anchoring (and presumably 29 years before that) I`ll stay with 8mm.
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Old 07-27-2017, 01:14 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomad Willy View Post
Lighter and stronger w a combination rode.
I'd recomend "Brait" for the nylon end.
OK on small boats
Far more difficult on large ones.
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Old 07-27-2017, 02:40 AM   #17
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OK on small boats
Far more difficult on large ones.
I guess I`m a small boat, but what is the issue?
That said I`ll likely go with nylon. As above, it`s unlikely to get wet.
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Old 07-27-2017, 08:24 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BruceK View Post
Al, thanks. 5/8" converts to 15.8 mm. So either 14 or 16 mm, I can check with Muir, Maxwell`s site says 14mm for 5/16 chain gypsy. Main focus still is getting the chain down the marina, someone suggested hauling the boat and getting the chain to it(using the battery charger flat out), seems overkill. Maybe I can hire a gorilla.
Quote:
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You are right Peter, all chain is sold here is sized in mm. 10mm=3/8; 8mm=5/16. I thought mine was the former but no, it`s the latter, 8mm.

If it helps... when we installed out Maxwell windlass, we got the whole combo rode from them, too.

RC 10-10 windlass, 5/16 x 5/8 chainwheel, plus pre-spliced rode made up of 5/16" chain and 5/8" Brait.

Using your note, I'd guess that suggests 8mm chain and 16mm 8-plait.

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Old 07-27-2017, 08:47 AM   #19
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Al, thanks. 5/8" converts to 15.8 mm. So either 14 or 16 mm, I can check with Muir, Maxwell`s site says 14mm for 5/16 chain gypsy. Main focus still is getting the chain down the marina, someone suggested hauling the boat and getting the chain to it(using the battery charger flat out), seems overkill. Maybe I can hire a gorilla.

Is there any place that has a dock that you can pull a truck and the boat up to and just hand the chain up and down between the two?

I had the chain on my previous boat re-galvanized and it took less than 10 minutes to pull up 350' of 3/8" chain directly from the locker with the aid of the Admiral.. going back in was even easier!

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Old 07-28-2017, 04:46 PM   #20
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I guess I`m a small boat, but what is the issue?
That said I`ll likely go with nylon. As above, it`s unlikely to get wet.
The issue is that they don't make rope/chain chainwheels for larger windlasses.

We'd have to pull the rope on the capstan side of the windlass which would be messy as the roller is oriented for the chain wheel, then when the chain is up lock it off , grab the slack and drop it on the chain wheel.

Somewhere in there we'd have to either feed all the rope down the hawspipe or unshackle the rope from chain.

All chain for us is much easier plus we need the weight.
An extra 1000kg in the bows would bring us closer to her lines.
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