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Old 02-24-2014, 01:14 AM   #1
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Anchor buoy

Fleet,
For those of you who use an anchor bouy how do you rig and deploy it?
Thanks,
Jim
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Old 02-24-2014, 05:52 AM   #2
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I put a shackel on the crown of the anchor that holds a 1/4 or 3/8 line.

The line goes thru the eye of a red plastic 10inch anchor ball and terminates in a lead sounding weight.

The 1/4 line is about 40 ft long and is hauled on deck after the windlass has the anchor secure in the bow roller.

The lead weight is used as required for depth measurement or a bottom sample..

The ball is simply allowed to drag off the deck as the anchor is set.

The weight touches bottom in shallow water , so reduces the ball movement to 20 ft , close enough for the next folks to know where your anchor is.

1/4 is usually enough to pull the anchor out from an obstruction with the windlass as required.

I dont usually use a ball for the stern anchor (lead to the bow) as usually its fairly close to the boat.
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Old 02-24-2014, 10:32 AM   #3
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FF,
Appreciate the good info. Sounds as if you rarely/never anchor in more than 40' of water then?
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Jim
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Old 02-24-2014, 10:44 AM   #4
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Jim & FF - Great question & answer. Explains stuff in the deck locker & how not to use it. New to most of the boating thing, much is common sense the rest is searching for solutions. Thanks again, Tonto.
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Old 02-24-2014, 10:44 AM   #5
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I never use one when anchoring in the PNW with chain and a heavy anchor. I fail to see the logic, even when anchoring in shallow East Coast locations unless the rode and anchor are very light. In crowded anchorages a floatee helps so you can holler and point as a new arrival is getting ready to drop anchor, "You're right on top of mine!"
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Old 02-24-2014, 02:18 PM   #6
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It make's sense to me. A little more equipment to dump in the water, however, if it gives you peace-of-mind, why not. You know within 20' or so where the hook is.
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Old 02-24-2014, 02:50 PM   #7
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A little more equipment to dump in the water, however, if it gives you peace-of-mind, why not. You know within 20' or so where the hook is.
A bunch of rope dumped around my anchor and chain does not give me piece of mind. Especially when raising the anchor at 3AM in a big blow.
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Old 02-24-2014, 03:17 PM   #8
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My boat has no rope just chain. 150'. I sailed around the Baja frm Ensenada as crew. When we dropped the hook, the ball & rope went with it. At the time & until further educated, it make sense. One reason given was to not pass over the anchor. You do have a good point. Thanks, Tonto
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Old 02-24-2014, 04:23 PM   #9
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Last summer while anchored in a Gulf Island cove (Canada) a sailboat entered and laid across my anchor. If I'd of had a bouy it could have prevented that incident. As an aside, I'd like to use the bouy line as a retrieval line in case of a struck anchor. Thoughts, ideas?
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Old 02-24-2014, 06:43 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Gandee View Post
Last summer while anchored in a Gulf Island cove (Canada) a sailboat entered and laid across my anchor. If I'd of had a bouy it could have prevented that incident. As an aside, I'd like to use the bouy line as a retrieval line in case of a struck anchor. Thoughts, ideas?
I had a couple of depth specific anchor buoys; used one once in a crowded anchorage, that was the last time, adds way too much hassle to the retrieval process. But yes, you could use it as a trip line if in an sketchy area.

When I first saw this thread, i thought it referred to something far more practical:



A nice technique to have ready for the day the windlass goes tango uniform
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Old 02-24-2014, 08:00 PM   #11
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I never use one when anchoring in the PNW with chain and a heavy anchor. I fail to see the logic, even when anchoring in shallow East Coast locations unless the rode and anchor are very light. .............
The logic is to fasten it to the head end of the anchor so if the anchor catches on tree stumps, rocks, etc., you can retrieve it and not have to cut the rode and lose the anchor.

I've only used one a couple times where I had been warned about underwater snags. One time when I didn't use one I brought a fairly large log up with my anchor but I was able to push it away and free the anchor.

FF describes the technique.
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Old 02-24-2014, 08:14 PM   #12
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The logic is to fasten it to the head end of the anchor so if the anchor catches on tree stumps, rocks, etc., you can retrieve it and not have to cut the rode and lose the anchor. .
I used to do this on a small Searay with a 15 lb Danforth anchor and no chain. Now with a very stout windlass, the ability to back and coast down the opposite way with a 60,000 lb vessel to free the anchor and about 300 lbs of anchor and chain hanging out there - it simply isn't necessary or practical to attach a water ski rope and buoy onto my anchor.
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Old 02-24-2014, 08:22 PM   #13
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. Especially when raising the anchor at 3AM in a big blow.
I haven't had to do that in at least three weeks.
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Old 02-24-2014, 08:34 PM   #14
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No more anchor buoy for me.

The last time I used one I woke up and discovered the boat had dragged several hundred feet. Sometime during the night the boat drifted over the buoy and it snagged on one of the prop shafts. Now dragging the anchor around backwards, and I was reluctant to use the motors since there is a line wrapped up.

The water was fairly warm so I dove and freed the shafts.

All chain rode now with no anchor buoy attached.
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Old 02-24-2014, 08:37 PM   #15
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No more anchor buoy for me.

The last time I used one I woke up and discovered the boat had dragged several hundred feet. Sometime during the night the boat drifted over the buoy and it snagged on one of the prop shafts. Now dragging the anchor around backwards, and I was reluctant to use the motors since there is a line wrapped up.

The water was fairly warm so I dove and freed the shafts.

All chain rode now with no anchor buoy attached.
Read FF's post closely, his method virtually eliminates that possibility.

I understand your concern but there are pros and cons...the trick is to see how many of the cons you can eliminate so the pros make anchoring even better...
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Old 02-24-2014, 08:39 PM   #16
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There are a lot of areas I've avoided where I feared the anchor being stuck on the bottom due to possible fouling. A future project is to acquire an anchor buoy system for the purpose to aid retrieval. Letting out rode using the windlass's foot pedal:

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Old 02-24-2014, 10:11 PM   #17
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Most all of my anchors are inexpensive and I've not yet had one stuck. But I have used a small buoy and a trip line. Don't bother unless I'm in an anchorage that is known for logging debris or similar. And then I use my very inexpensive Claw anchor.
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Old 02-24-2014, 10:17 PM   #18
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Some good info, thanks for the great discussion thus far! I can sure see how an bouy line could foul easily. Sounds like most other things in life in that there are times to use it and times it wouldn't be so important.
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Old 02-24-2014, 10:36 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by millennium View Post
No more anchor buoy for me.

The last time I used one I woke up and discovered the boat had dragged several hundred feet. Sometime during the night the boat drifted over the buoy and it snagged on one of the prop shafts. Now dragging the anchor around backwards, and I was reluctant to use the motors since there is a line wrapped up.

The water was fairly warm so I dove and freed the shafts.

All chain rode now with no anchor buoy attached.
Couldn't agree more. No-one - repeat no-one, uses those anchor floats here in Queensland. Never seen one used anyway. I suspect we have a bit more room in popular anchorages however.
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Old 02-24-2014, 11:18 PM   #20
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At the risk of piling on, I considered a buoy/trip line for a while. Then decided why complicate a simple process. Am purchasing a new anchor from Hopkins Carter tomorrow and frankly if I lose it-I lose it. I'll just order another new one.

I suppose folks that anchor in snag prone areas find bouy/trip lines handy but haven't heard of many folks losing anchors in my area or on the forum.
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