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Old 10-13-2015, 01:31 PM   #1
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AC-14 Type HHP Stockless Anchors

My shipbuilder is providing this anchor style, proposing a 60kg weight for my 15 meter (50 ft) 60 ton trawler. Offhand I feel this is too light for a stockless, but does anyone have experience with this style of anchor?
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Old 10-13-2015, 01:35 PM   #2
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Here's a drawing.
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Old 10-14-2015, 11:44 AM   #3
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As always, the places I typically start are the manufacturer.


High holding Power Anchors | Sotra Anchor & Chain


What you've pictured is an AC-14 which is a high-holding anchor and claims to be able to reduce the size/weight by 25%.
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Old 10-14-2015, 12:11 PM   #4
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Thank you, so yes I have now written to the company for input.

Independently though, since my boat is being designed and built to ABS, I read through ABS Rules Part 3, did the calculation which yielded:
*Equipment Number EN = 52
*Stockless Anchor (Navy) = 120 kg
*AC-14 has a 25% reduction = 90 kg

If I can get my shipyard to supply one with sharpened flukes then my gut feeling is that a 90 kg (200 lb) unit would be adequate as working/storm.

It seems that lots of TF members have experience with the Forfjord, which is NOT an HHP, but I'm still hoping someone might chime in.

Right now I'm heading in the direction of the stockless as a primary, a large Fortress or Danforth as a storm anchor and then a spade kedge/stern anchor of half weight (maybe 60 lbs).
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Old 10-14-2015, 02:51 PM   #5
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Personally I hate the stockless styles of anchors. They always seem to drag unless they are very, very heavy and oversized for the boat. I don't believe they penetrate the bottom very well in many cases.

I would have almost any other type of anchor as my primary one over a stockless.

And I sure as hell wouldn't have one on a 50' boat. Let alone a 200lb one.
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Old 10-15-2015, 02:13 PM   #6
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They are not intended to penetrate in the usual sense of the word. Ever tried to pull a buldozer .. w the blade down? Yes thay are heavy. But if I was to get an anchor that would work well on all bottoms an anchor of this type would be my choice. I have a stockless anchor a 35lb Dreadnought. May be the only one on the forum that does. The most distinguished feature among other stockless anchors is it's very long and heavy shank. I've only used it once. It was in a small quiet bay in The north end of the Broughton Is Group. I dropped it down in about 30' of water .. Probably a mud bottom. I took the slack out of the rode in reverse and still at an idle the rode snapped straight and running up to 1500rpm in reverse nothing changed. Seemed to instantly set. No wind that night and retrieval was normal.

As a storm anchor re holding power I have no idea. I didn't post earlier as my anchor was not the focus of the post but is similar .. except for the long shank. I have put in stops that limit it's throat angle to about 37 degrees. However many of these stockless anchors use a setting of 45 degrees. Perhaps the weight in the center of the shank attach point permit wider throat angles. The Chesapeke Bay anchor test showed what a wide angle can do to increase holding power in very soft bottoms.
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Old 10-15-2015, 02:43 PM   #7
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Here are two pics of the Dreadnought.

1. A fishing boat in Craig Alaska w a good sized Dreadnought. The skipper says it holds in summer 50 knot gales but drags in the 60 knot winter gales.

2. The first Dread I had. 45lbs.

Re Shrew's link the Union anchor is most similar to the Dreadnought. Except for the short shank.
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Old 10-15-2015, 03:14 PM   #8
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That is a different anchor than the ones under discussion.
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Old 10-15-2015, 07:41 PM   #9
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You've been paying attention Bill.
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Old 10-15-2015, 08:48 PM   #10
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"But if I was to get an anchor that would work well on all bottoms an anchor of this type would be my choice."

I took that to mean you were talking about the anchors type in question. But I'm now guess I misinterpreted it.

And you were really talking about the anchor in your picture?
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Old 10-15-2015, 10:22 PM   #11
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Bill,
No ... the AC-14. The Dreadnought must be a fairly good anchor as quite a number (15 maybe 20) fishing boats have them on their bows. I think over half of them are used as a primary anchor regularly so I'm guessing their performance is fairly good. If I was anchoring on a gale forecast I'd use my usual storm anchor .. not the Dreadnought. There is a older couple w a 50' steel boat in LaConner that goes to Alaska for the summer every year and a fairly rusty Navy anchor (not overly large) rests in his bow. I don't know the limits of these "stockless anchors" and am curious about them.m
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Old 10-15-2015, 10:39 PM   #12
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Like I said and FWIW, I've run several big boats with them and I hate them.
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Old 10-15-2015, 11:16 PM   #13
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I'm just learning about the AC-14 as well, but when you analyze it you realize that it has very good features. Look at the flukes:
  • Sharp points to provide some penetration
  • Large area
  • Flattish so it is intended to bury to some degree, unlike a Navy which just sits on the surface like a bucket of concrete
  • Fluke angle of 35
  • Somewhat of a "plow" shape to the flukes.

Seems to me to be a stockless that is trying to pretend that its parents were CQR and a Danforth I'm starting to like this baby more and more. Pound for pound it won't compete with a Rocna or Excel, but it's not supposed to - it's a stockless that mostly relies on its weight.

Will do some research to see if there are any holding power tests conducted.
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Old 10-15-2015, 11:25 PM   #14
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Yeah, they've got to be great if it takes at least a 200 lb one to hold a 50' boat.

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Old 10-26-2015, 10:56 PM   #15
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Yeah, they've got to be great if it takes at least a 200 lb one to hold a 50' boat.

I suppose the same would hold true for your super-duper high holding power Excel anchor, which Rex has recommended a 194 lb version.

Hold on, let me insert one of those cute creatures here...
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Old 10-26-2015, 11:32 PM   #16
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Mako,
That shank looks really fat. I can easily belive little penetration will take place. But I like the flukes. And that mass behiend the flukes is a fair copy of a bulldozer blade. With very little penetration it should push up a huge mass of mud, sand gravel or whatever. I see that as it's ticket to holding power. I'd like to see a longer slimmer shank shaped like a Fortress shank but in steel.

What is the smallest AC-14 available?

Rex is in the bigger is better fraternity. President of the club perhaps.
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Old 10-27-2015, 01:48 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by makobuilders View Post
I suppose the same would hold true for your super-duper high holding power Excel anchor, which Rex has recommended a 194 lb version.

Hold on, let me insert one of those cute creatures here...
A 194 lb Excel is recommended for a 50' boat!?
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Old 10-27-2015, 08:13 AM   #18
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Capt Bill, you make me laugh!

Anyway, yes Mr. Many, that shank is fatter than on the smaller models. That anchor is probably about 1/2 ton or more, but if I recall, the smallest model is about 100 lbs.

I suppose we are all opinionated based on our own experiences. I respect that Rex knows his anchor sizing better than anyone, but still I got into a gentle argument with him and personally disagree over his recommended sizing for a typical spade style SHHP anchor. However, weight has serious affect on anchor load when it comes to surge and heave, so maybe he's right??

My ship yard (not a yacht builder) specializes in tugs and are designing my boat to ABS. Therefore they are recommending a stockless as per their experience.

Considering my 50 ft boat is 60 tons, carrying the 200 lbs of weight on the nose is no big deal and in fact I could use the extra weight and reduce ballast a bit. BTW, I'm actually looking into trimming several tons off her lines.
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Old 10-27-2015, 03:56 PM   #19
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AC-14 Type HHP Stockless Anchors

Curious. Is your design for an anchor table/hawse to have this anchor completely flush with the hull? I ask because this seems to be the commonality for the stock less style like this model. It only takes a rectangular recess, with a heck of a fluke inset. The only issue I have seen is the nasty scrapes when bringing them home when the flukes point in versus out. Can be a real PITA to have to 'flip' the anchor around to get it to stow.
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Old 10-28-2015, 01:42 AM   #20
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Can be a real PITA to have to 'flip' the anchor around to get it to stow.
Not a bad idea to have it recess instead of sitting agaist the hull. The entire recess would have to be stainless steel, as well as a protective SS plate below the recess, so when the anchor comes up it does not gouge the paint.

Certainly I don't want this anchor on a bow roller. Will have to think about this.
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