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Old 03-06-2016, 01:40 PM   #41
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Why do so many large boats and ships have one of many different kinds of stockless anchor? Must be a reason why they don't have Spade's or whatever yacht anchor. I've always thought it was to avoid all the problems associated w yacht anchors. Many here probably think they're stuck in the past and/or that they are so dumb they can't see the advantages of new yacht anchors.

The sea floor is a mysterious place that holds surprises and a stockless anchor may be much better at dealing w the unknown sea floor. Also like a Claw they nest on the hull side very gracefully in a hawspipe. Just pull it up till it goes clank (or boom) and secure the winch. In a word .... bullet proof.

Stockless anchors are getting more popular on yachts but it may be the lure of "sporting" a big boat feature for other boaters to admire. But some yachts don't "sport" an anchor at all. The anchor on such yachts is called (by Manson) a "hiding" anchor and is drawn up through the hull bottom until the anchor bottom becomes part of the hull.

However many fishermen in Alaska use some sort of stockless anchor and have been doing so for longer than we have been alive. The clear favorite anchor for the Alaska fishermen is the Forfjord .. clearly a stockless anchor. I had one and practically gave it away. Wouldn't set the only time I tried it. And the Forfjord is'nt a museum piece at all ... is currently available at West Marine.

A trawler skipper that spends his summers in SE AK w a 50' steel trawler has a stockless anchor on his bow and it's seen a lot of use over many years.

The pics came out in the wrong order in post #29.
The correct order is:
1&2 stockless anchors.
3 Navy I think
4 my Dreadnought
5 Craig AK fisherman's Dreadnought.

Pics here are;
1. A Petersburg AK packer.
2. The trawler skipper's 50' boat mentioned above (Gray Pelican) w the Navy anchor.
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Old 03-06-2016, 11:24 PM   #42
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Quote:
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Why do so many large boats and ships have one of many different kinds of stockless anchor? Must be a reason why they don't have Spade's or whatever yacht anchor....The sea floor is a mysterious place that holds surprises and a stockless anchor may be much better at dealing w the unknown sea floor. Also like a Claw they nest on the hull side very gracefully in a hawspipe. Just pull it up till it goes clank (or boom) and secure the winch. In a word .... bullet proof.
I think you just nailed it right there Eric. In a word, (well two words), copes well with most bottoms, but most important it draws up snugly & stows in a hawse pipe arrangement, which for a large vessel, where size & weight are crucial, and a bow roller assembly is not practical, those features need to take precedence and dictate the anchor type. Period.

In smaller boats we have the luxury of being able to adapt our retrieval equipment and use different designs of anchor, which can and do work better, but have shapes that preclude their use in the large ship type of configuration.
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Old 03-07-2016, 06:16 AM   #43
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Being that stockless anchors are not usually used on small boats and certainly are neither very high tech nor sexy, they don't seem to have too much available data or even pull tests done.

But I would say that choosing the correct stockless design is as important as it is for all the mainstream anchors. Example, for my boat:
1. Navy style - ABS requires a 264 lb anchor;
2. AC-14 or Pool - ABS requires only 200 lbs;
3. Posidonia (per Murray's thread) - ABS only requires a 132 lb version.

The Navy is nothing but a pile of deadweight as most likely are the dreadnought, Baldt and Halls. But the others have good burrowing characteristics. The Posidonia is basically a stockless Danforth on steroids.

Granted, an anchor that relies on very heavy weight to be effective is not going to be very welcome on a 30-50 ft cruiser of moderate displacement, but for heavier boats an extra hundred pounds means nothing, and they store so nicely.

Just my opinion... give me another year and perhaps I'll conduct some anchor pull tests on these babies, then we'll combine that with Panope's awesome information.
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Old 03-07-2016, 06:51 AM   #44
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Mako, as a matter of interest, how far along the build are you, and do you have any pics of the hull, or even drawings, so we can get an idea of how it looks. Your boat is presumably steel or maybe ferro, in view of its displacement. I'm intrigued...
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Old 03-07-2016, 11:06 AM   #45
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The shipyard just took on an order for two more tugs, so my design finalization will most likely be delayed to April. Then I send it to a consultant to design the flume tank. It is steel.
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Old 03-07-2016, 12:15 PM   #46
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PeterB,
Thank you much for supporting my "copes well with most bottoms" remark. It's hard to imagine a big ship coming into anchorage and discovering it's a mud or rocky bottom that doesn't suit their anchor.

But another thought that trails that is that most trawlers here on TF have only one anchor readily available. I'm an oddity in that I've got 3 or 4 and frequently I choose an anchor because it's mostly disposable. My smallest Danforth was such an anchor but now after many uses and excellent performance I'd kinda hate to loose it.

In the 50's most boats had a big serious Danforth (not a cheap copy) and some sort of Yachtsman's anchor .. the century's old kedge for rocky bottoms. Other than the propensity for the Dan to think it was a farm implement harvesting something to the occasional bent shank the early 50's yachts had it pretty well to well covered. The new anchors are ahead of them to be sure but equally sure is that they aren't light years ahead. Most of us could go for years w the 1950's ground tackle and do fine and be safe.

Perhaps I'll use my Dreadnought again but I may not be able to report much. It does resemble the common stockless ship anchors of the present day except for it's long shank. The one time I used it it set instantly.

The stockless anchors may become more popular w boaters getting tired of paying extra moorage for their yacht anchors. Many pay extra for their anchor AND their dinghy.
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Old 03-13-2016, 04:19 AM   #47
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The stockless anchors may become more popular w boaters getting tired of paying extra moorage for their yacht anchors. Many pay extra for their anchor AND their dinghy.
Yes, and this is even a bigger issue for those with plumb bows where you wind up with a battering ram sticking out 2 to 3 feet. Expensive, plus ugly, unless your boat's name is the Nautilus.
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Old 03-13-2016, 07:30 AM   #48
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I would stow my anchor off the bow while at dock if I had to pay for it.

Fortunately neither at my home dock or the dozens of Marinas I have been to on the ICW charge for my anchor.

They might get more aggressive now that my dingy is horizontal on a davits because it lo,oks like it sticks out a lot....but the bow looks normal even with a 60 pound Manson on a short sprit.

So it might take some time before people start looking g at anchors to save them money at dock....my bet is it is still about anchoring for awhile.
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Old 03-13-2016, 12:56 PM   #49
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I think the stockless anchors on yachts such as trawlers will become more popular over time. Features that are viewed as big boat features are always popular. The ever popular flying bridge was even popular on boats 23 to 25' for awhile. We probably won't see Navy anchors on 16' OB boats but 35 to 45' trawlers may soon be frequently be using stockless ...... because it's a big boat feature.

But IMO their weight, strength and lattitude w varying bottom conditions will continue make them popular.

I think all the marinas around here charge the basic (per ft) charge for the overall boat length including all overhangs. Bow rollers to bow pulpits and swim steps to dinghys on davits but I don't see any bow pulpits being removed. The owners must consider paying for extra apendages fly stuff. And others or most probably consider them inexpendable. They are not of course.

How many here are presently using a stockless anchor as their primary? I'm not including the Forfjord .... only ship style anchors strongly resembling the well known Navy anchor.
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Old 03-13-2016, 06:20 PM   #50
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Hi Eric,
I guess this will qualify.
I'm told it's 350 pounds,(pick it up and put it on the scales? Not me).

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Old 03-13-2016, 06:30 PM   #51
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Hi Eric,
I guess this will qualify.
I'm told it's 350 pounds,(pick it up and put it on the scales? Not me).

Ted
Yikes! How do you get that hairy chested beast started...with a peavey pole and run like hell?
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Old 03-13-2016, 06:51 PM   #52
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Just about I guess.
Pull some slack chain (back off the brake) and lift the shank to start the slide.
Winch is power in only, hydraulic off the main engine.

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Old 03-13-2016, 07:16 PM   #53
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Ted you mean ......
No you must have a brake to control the fall so you can lower the anchor any speed you want. I had visions of that big old Navy head'in for the bottom in free fall. That could jerk the bow right off.

OK good ......
We've got a stockless primary in the forum. One ... Sorry I forgot about you Ted. We'll be back up the Island many times.
Lets see how many we have in a year. Could be quite a few more.

Ted it actually looks like you cut off the ears at the base of the anchor that pushes the ass end up so your flukes have an angle of attack to the bottom. How does it work that way? Yea I know ... 350lbs.
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Old 03-22-2016, 11:13 PM   #54
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Check out the Watson 48', it has dual pool anchors, looks great, even without being in a recess.
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Old 03-22-2016, 11:47 PM   #55
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Here is the link:

http://www.realtrawlers.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=44&It emid=41
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