Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-14-2012, 09:30 AM   #1
Veteran Member
 
MT Nest's Avatar
 
City: PNW
Country: USA
Vessel Name: M/T Nest
Vessel Model: 1984 Monk 36 #31
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 44
VHF Antenna

What's the average life of a VHF antenna?
__________________
Advertisement

MT Nest is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2012, 09:43 AM   #2
Guru
 
Edelweiss's Avatar
 
City: PNW
Country: USA
Vessel Model: 1976 Californian Tricabin LRC
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 1,834
Quote:
Originally Posted by MT Nest View Post
What's the average life of a VHF antenna?
__________________________________________

Hard to say, I don't think they have an average life. Mine is 35 years old and still working fine. But keep in mind, the white fiberglass pole is just the casing, the real antennae is the cable inside. As long as, it's not bent alot or exposed to sun light it could be many years.
There was an earlier post on here discussing revitilizing the fiberglass mast. I've never tried it myself but you may try searching for that.
Larry B.
__________________

Edelweiss is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2012, 07:53 PM   #3
Scraping Paint
 
City: -
Country: -
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,748
Outside of corrosion attacking the metal components the thing that usually kills an antenna is the deterioration of the fiberglass casing. How fast this occurs probably depends on the climate your boat is in and if it's outside in the weather and UV all year or lives in a boathouse. The deterioration is most often indicated by the outside of the casing becoming "hairy" as the finish weathers off and the glass fibers begin to delaminate or whatever the correct term is.

The two most common cures for this are 1) replace the antenna or 2) sand off the "hairs" and paint it. The paint will not affect the reception or transmission of the radio.

When we installed a 24-foot VHF antenna for our lower helm radio some nine or ten years ago the local electronics dealer we buy all our electronics from told us that Shakespeare had recently improved the antenna casings on all its higher-end antennas and the new ones should last much longer. What starts out in the high-end of a product line usually trickles down into the lower end stuff so I would imagine that the outer finish and fiberglass casing on today's antennas hold up a lot better than they used to.
Marin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2012, 08:23 PM   #4
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,887
Quote:
Originally Posted by MT Nest View Post
What's the average life of a VHF antenna?
Not to be a smart a**....but whenever it stops working the way you want it to.

The previous posters pointed out that if the innards are working OK...the fiberglass shell can be frayed, worn, broken (and repaired), nasty...etc..etc and that doesn't matter. I heard success with paint, varnish and enven shrink tube used to redo the fiberglass tube.

Whatever floats your boat...but performance is all that matters.
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2012, 09:45 PM   #5
Master and Commander
 
markpierce's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Carquinez Coot
Vessel Model: 2011 Seahorse Marine Coot hull #6
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 10,262
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marin View Post
Outside of corrosion attacking the metal components the thing that usually kills an antenna is the deterioration of the fiberglass casing.
Glad I don't have to worry about a fiberglass casing.

__________________
Kar-KEEN-ez Koot
markpierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2012, 12:52 AM   #6
Guru
 
Carey's Avatar
 
City: Bellingham, WA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Happy Destiny
Vessel Model: Custom Lobster Yacht
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,101
Morad Morad VHF-156 HD
Another option to get you away from fiberglass casings and into a lifetime antenna.
Morad VHF-156 HD

These antennas are awesome. I have had two on my boat for over ten years and they look like new. They are made of aluminum tubing with about a two foot stainless whip on the end. They mount to aluminum tubes in lengths from three to ten feet I believe. No plastic anywhere.

This one was mounted on a forty foot tower at home for many years to use as a Coast Guard emergency repeater. Keepin it just in case.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC_0002.jpg
Views:	88
Size:	153.5 KB
ID:	11340  
__________________
Carey Worthen
Master of Disaster
Carey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2012, 06:51 AM   #7
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,524
Mostly the life depends on how often it is used as a hand rail.

FF
__________________

FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:57 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012