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Old 05-07-2014, 07:59 AM   #1
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TV antenna

Can someone recommend a small tv antenna that I can install behind my salon tv. I don't want to run cabling to a bridge mounted antenna nor do I want to supply AC power to it.
Thanks
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Old 05-07-2014, 09:24 AM   #2
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Unless you are within 10 miles of most digital TV stations an indoor non pre-amplified antenna won't give you good results. If you are will to live with that limitation go to Radio Shack and see the selection they have. Otherwise I would recommend running RG-6 from the TV to a 12VDC amplified Glomex V9125 antenna and pre-amplifier.
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Old 05-07-2014, 12:57 PM   #3
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Tim, there are some pre-amped "rabbit ears" (yep, shop Radio Shack). FWIW, I think they actually use DC, from an AC converter (wall wart). With decent length cables, you can at least move the sucker around a bit to encourage better reception in some cases.

We have the Glomex solution, which seems to work just fine when the broadcast stations cooperate and we're not being severely blocked by various obstructions.

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Old 05-07-2014, 01:25 PM   #4
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Take a look at "The Leaf" antenna. Works well for me.
https://store.gomohu.com/the-leaf-in...v-antenna.html
Mohu Leaf Indoor Antenna Review
No business connections to these guys, just own and use their antenna.
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Old 05-07-2014, 01:29 PM   #5
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I mentioned Radio Shack because if you save the packing material and it doesn't work most stores will let you return the product and either refund your money or let you buy another product (store credit).
I really suggest an outside of the boat antenna for best results. I have tried most outdoor marine units and the Glomex V9125 has consistently worked best for me.
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Old 05-07-2014, 03:29 PM   #6
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Find an aluminum scrap bike wheel.

Cut all the spokes out then cut the unit in to 2 half circles.

Use any insulation , wood will do and space the halves back to a circle but not touching..

Use a 300-75 ohm connected to either half wheel and bring the 75 ohm coax into your TV.

4 holes and some string will allow you to hang the antenna as high as you can, and to easily strike it when not required.
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Old 05-07-2014, 04:06 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by FF View Post
Find an aluminum scrap bike wheel.

Cut all the spokes out then cut the unit in to 2 half circles.

Use any insulation , wood will do and space the halves back to a circle but not touching..

Use a 300-75 ohm connected to either half wheel and bring the 75 ohm coax into your TV.

4 holes and some string will allow you to hang the antenna as high as you can, and to easily strike it when not required.
I love reading about home-brew projects, what frequency would this bike wheel be resonant at? This antenna sounds like the old 6 or 2 meter Halo antenna, but these only worked in a very narrow frequency band.
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Old 05-07-2014, 04:18 PM   #8
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Isnt all US broadcasting now digital? And is it the same or different frequency range as analog was? It will mater with respect to the antenna. The few digital antenna that I've seen are much smaller than the old TV roof antennas, so I suspect the frequencies are a higher now and old antennas won't be of any use.
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Old 05-07-2014, 05:57 PM   #9
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Most digital over the air TV in the US is done in the new UHF band.
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Old 05-07-2014, 06:00 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Billylll View Post
I mentioned Radio Shack because if you save the packing material and it doesn't work most stores will let you return the product and either refund your money or let you buy another product (store credit).
I really suggest an outside of the boat antenna for best results. I have tried most outdoor marine units and the Glomex V9125 has consistently worked best for me.
Bill
I have a two year old 14" Shakespeare Seawatch antenna. A buddy of mine a few docks over has an older Glomex. I "sometimes" can get two stations. He consistently gets 10+ stations. My antenna actually sets about five feet higher than his. I am considering the Glomex.
When I am within 10 miles of the Baltimore/DC area I can pick up 50 stations. My dock is about 45 miles away from the metro area.
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Old 05-07-2014, 06:01 PM   #11
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My old school antenna works just fine. No cable or satellite TV in our house and all the local channels are fine. "Digital" tv antenna is a marketing gimmick.
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Old 05-07-2014, 06:03 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Gulf Comanche View Post
Take a look at "The Leaf" antenna. Works well for me.
https://store.gomohu.com/the-leaf-in...v-antenna.html
Mohu Leaf Indoor Antenna Review
No business connections to these guys, just own and use their antenna.
Mike
The Leaf antenna is actually a design called a "Patch" antenna.
They can work fairly well if you are fairly close to the DTV station. I thought I would mention there is really no such thing as a digital TV antenna. Any antenna that works in the TV bands, is broadband by nature and has or doesn't have a preamplifer (that is linear) will work There are lots of older style TV antennas that will do a fine job receiving digital over the air TV. So there is no need to upgrade your existing antenna if it's in working order for a "digital TV antenna".
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Old 05-07-2014, 06:06 PM   #13
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Isnt all US broadcasting now digital? And is it the same or different frequency range as analog was? It will mater with respect to the antenna. The few digital antenna that I've seen are much smaller than the old TV roof antennas, so I suspect the frequencies are a higher now and old antennas won't be of any use.
First, There is no such thing as a "digital antenna". It's advertising BS. An antenna picks up RF signals. It doesn't know or care what the content is.

Second, not all US TV broadcasting is digital. The vast majority of it is, but some low powered stations were allowed to continue broadcasting analog.

Third, The TV band used to be split, two through six at lower frequencies, seven through thirteen at higher frequencies (FM radio and some commercial services were in between) and UHF. In it's infinite wisdom, the government gave the lower VHF frequencies to other users but kept the upper VHF band and the UHF band for TV. That means your antenna still has to pick up seven through 13 of the VHF TV band and the UHF band. A smaller VHF only antenna won't pick up the VHF stations that may or may not be broadcasting in your area very well.

Just to make sure things were as confusing as possible, the government allowed the stations formerly broadcasting on the lower VHF band (2 through 6) to keep their channel numbers even though they are now broadcasting in the UHF band. Example; what you know as channel 4 might actually be broadcasting on channel 42.
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Old 05-07-2014, 06:14 PM   #14
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Ron excellent post.
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Old 05-07-2014, 11:38 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by FF View Post
Find an aluminum scrap bike wheel.

Cut all the spokes out then cut the unit in to 2 half circles.

Use any insulation , wood will do and space the halves back to a circle but not touching..

Use a 300-75 ohm connected to either half wheel and bring the 75 ohm coax into your TV.

4 holes and some string will allow you to hang the antenna as high as you can, and to easily strike it when not required.
If you " recycle" a old groco or equal head and turn it into a planter up on deck you will complete the ensemble!
Rube Goldberg would be proud

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Old 05-08-2014, 06:44 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by rwidman View Post
First, There is no such thing as a "digital antenna". It's advertising BS. An antenna picks up RF signals. It doesn't know or care what the content is.

Second, not all US TV broadcasting is digital. The vast majority of it is, but some low powered stations were allowed to continue broadcasting analog.

Third, The TV band used to be split, two through six at lower frequencies, seven through thirteen at higher frequencies (FM radio and some commercial services were in between) and UHF. In it's infinite wisdom, the government gave the lower VHF frequencies to other users but kept the upper VHF band and the UHF band for TV. That means your antenna still has to pick up seven through 13 of the VHF TV band and the UHF band. A smaller VHF only antenna won't pick up the VHF stations that may or may not be broadcasting in your area very well.

Just to make sure things were as confusing as possible, the government allowed the stations formerly broadcasting on the lower VHF band (2 through 6) to keep their channel numbers even though they are now broadcasting in the UHF band. Example; what you know as channel 4 might actually be broadcasting on channel 42.
Great post Ron. So what antenna do you have?
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Old 05-08-2014, 06:47 AM   #17
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I think Ron has a Glomex mounted under his upper helm.
I'll let Ron respond.
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Old 05-08-2014, 04:43 PM   #18
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It's not easy finding a Glomex antenna.
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Old 05-08-2014, 05:05 PM   #19
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It's not easy finding a Glomex antenna.
Defender.com Search Results: glomex

And yes, I have a Glomex antenna mounted under the flybridge dash. I'm not sure but I think it's the GX-V9112/12AB.

The amplifier has two inputs, one for the antenna and one for cable or another antenna. That way, if you're at a marina with cable, you only have to switch a switch (and of course connect to the cable outlet on the dock).
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Old 05-08-2014, 05:06 PM   #20
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Ron excellent post.
Bill
Thanks.

And to add to what I posted, while the digital conversion was long overdue and brought some great features to TV, you can no longer use a marginal signal and get a picture with snow or interference. You get a great picture or no picture at all. The effective range of the broadcast is much less than with analog and that's a real disadvantage for folks who want to watch TV on their boats.
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