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Old 10-24-2012, 02:05 AM   #21
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Gee. In my couple decades of pre-trawler/Coot experiences on sailboats (29-foot sloop and 24-foot cutter), only had charts, compass, and binoculars. It's much easier now navigating with GPS, electronic charts, radar, depth gauge, auto-pilot, and VHF.
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Old 10-24-2012, 02:16 AM   #22
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My boating in Hawaii was pre-GPS. Loran existed but nobody I boated with had it. Our navigation was our view of the islands. When we fished off the north shore of Oahu out some 30-50 miles we didn't use a compass and if there were charts on the boat I never saw them. We simply went out, trolled around for a day, and headed back. The closer we got the more obvious the landmarks were and so we corrected our course accordingly.

At the start of our boating here in Puget Sound we got the relevant charts, of course, and we soon put a plotting Loran-C on the Arima. So while I know how to do it I've never actually had to run a boat using a compass and following courses plotted on a chart. I've pre-plotted a number of courses in our chartbooks to places we visit frequently in the islands on the theory that if the electricicals all stop holding hands we can transition immediately to the charts and the compass (which we use to hold a course anyway so we're used to using it). But so far we've never had to do that.
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Old 10-24-2012, 05:14 AM   #23
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It's much easier now navigating with GPS, electronic charts, radar, depth gauge, auto-pilot, and VHF.
Motoring up and down a river in daylight is called "pilotage." A paper chart and one eyeball is all you need for that.
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Old 10-24-2012, 08:27 AM   #24
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"if I were to be using the boat in the middle of an ocean I would want the best possible (with in my budget) and not two outdated items of the same thing. The SSB's are 30 years and 45 years old. The radar is a 1992 vintage and the other 1997. The chart plotter is of the 80' or 90's as is the NECO Autopilot."

So you would rather have a "modern" all in one setup , where you pop a fuse and revert to the sextant and DR plot?

Old stuff is not BAD stuff , if its proven and working old stuff is easier to get repaired in West nowhere. \

The new stuff just gets replaced , OK if you have 2 or 3 spares, and are at your home dock.
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Old 10-25-2012, 01:08 PM   #25
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You can never be too rich, too thin or have too many electronics.
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Old 10-25-2012, 08:32 PM   #26
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I've heard it said that 10 year old electronics are worth about 50 cents a pound.
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Old 10-27-2012, 08:24 AM   #27
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"I've heard it said that 10 year old electronics are worth about 50 cents a pound."

At the pace of modern "improvements" and model changes , that might be 10 weeks?
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Old 10-27-2012, 08:59 AM   #28
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You can never be too rich, too thin or have too many electronics.
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Old 10-27-2012, 12:23 PM   #29
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I've heard it said that 10 year old electronics are worth about 50 cents a pound.
Assuming 25 year old gear is worth half that, then I've got a $2 Furuno fish finder that works like a champ!! It would cost 500 times that to replace it.
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Old 10-27-2012, 01:58 PM   #30
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It would cost 500 times that to replace it.

About what a $20 gold coin is worth today .
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Old 10-27-2012, 02:43 PM   #31
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Advice we were given a long time ago by a long-time boater and shipwright was "Never replace anything on a boat unless it's broken or doesn't do what you need it to do anymore."

We've found it to be a very sensible and cost-effective policy. Better, in our minds, to put several hundred dollars worth of fuel in the boat and then use it than put the same amount of money into a new radio just to get some new bells and whistles when the old radio does everything we need it to do just fine.
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Old 10-27-2012, 05:38 PM   #32
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Ah, the Southland. A very different place indeed.
It is indeed. Whoever heard a song about missing the North?

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Old 10-27-2012, 09:07 PM   #33
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[QUOTE=Moonstruck;109920]It is indeed. Whoever heard a song about missing the North?

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Old 10-28-2012, 01:25 AM   #34
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Motoring up and down a river in daylight is called "pilotage." A paper chart and one eyeball is all you need for that.
Not necessarily so. For instance, the lower reaches of the Napa River are very broad, and only the narrow, curving natural channel is navigable. And even if there are navigation markers, straight-lining between markers can get one aground. With constant attention to depthometer and electronic charts/GPS, it can be navigated without local knowledge.

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Old 10-28-2012, 06:41 AM   #35
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Pilotage is far more than "straight-lining."

Do you think river and coastal navigation was only made possible by "constant attention to depthometer and electronic charts/GPS ...?"
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Old 10-28-2012, 08:55 AM   #36
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Pilotage is far more than "straight-lining."

On thw A-ICW its running from marker to marker , some are so close together not hitting them is the challenge.
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Old 10-28-2012, 10:33 AM   #37
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Mark

Post 34 shows the CA style hazards of boating in 6' seas with squalls apparent on the horizon. I assume you had your radar as well as chart plottter on when in those horrible storm strewn waters. I await your pictures of Coot scooting up the coast to the PNW.

As a wee lad I used ot boat in SF Bay. It was the worst water I'd ever seen (only water too at that point!), until I went under the Golden Gate towards the Farralon Is.
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Old 10-28-2012, 12:54 PM   #38
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Sunchaser, during my 1960s sailboating days we'd annually go to the Lightship, about half way to the Farallon Islands, with only chart, tide tables, binoculars, and compass. It was always rough, visibility was often limited, and I always got seasick.

It's more benign in the Bay although the chop can get nasty. Storms here are usually mild. Bay waters are often calm during rain storms, but are rough on clear yet windy days.
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Old 10-28-2012, 02:15 PM   #39
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It's not the water that gets ya. It's the hard stuff around the edges.
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