Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-31-2014, 09:23 PM   #21
Guru
 
djmarchand's Avatar
 
City: East Greenwich, RI
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Bella
Vessel Model: Mainship Pilot 34
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 2,881
Wil:

Ok, we can agree to disagree about 24v DC systems. But can you please drop the "hybrid" term. That term connotes two different power sources like a combustion engine and a battery/motor system. What you are talking about isn't.

David
__________________
Advertisement

djmarchand is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-31-2014, 09:25 PM   #22
Guru
 
twistedtree's Avatar
 
City: Gloucester, MA
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 3,197
I hear 3, maybe 4 questions being munged together, and it might help to separate them out. The original questions/suppositions that I hear are:

1) Is a 24VDC system better than a 12V system? The 24V system would of course have a 12V subsystem, but it would be primarily a 24V system. On bigger boats, say 50' and up, 24V systems seem pretty much the norm in modern builds, and it has all the advantages you mention. Yes, 24V is arguably better for a larger system.

2) Alternative DC charging systems. In particular, reducing or eliminating the AC generator, adding an engine-powered DC generator and bigger alternator(s) on the main engine, and adding solar and/or wind generation. All these have subtleties to them. I'm not at all convinced that an engine driven DC generator is better than an AC generator. The DC generator might be electrically more efficient, but teh AC generator is more flexible in its ability to power heavy loads like Air Con, washer drier, over, etc. Plus, you can charge batteries really fast with a big generator and enough charger capacity. And you need the chargers anyway (at least some of them) for charging on shore power. Personally, I'd stick with a reliable, servicable, AC generator. And keep in mind that fuel consumption for a generator is based on how much power it is generating, not how much it's capable of generating. It's just like your propulsion engines in that respect. So a smaller generator putting out 5KW and a large generator putting out 5KW will consume about the same amount of fuel.

Wind seems good, but personally I hate them. I've never had one myself, mostly because I can't stand them when they are 100 yds away on another boat, let alone on mine. They just make too much noise. And from people I've talked to who own them, they don't generate much power either.

I like solar, but there is a real question of whether you can fit enough on your boat to make a meaningful impact on your power budget. Unless it helps reduce generator run time in a meaningful way, it's just extra baggage. I'm struggling with this currently on my boat. The power I can get from solar on my boat is only a drop in the bucket compared to the power that other owners report using on a daily basis. But I'm pretty sure I can get my power useage down to a level where the solar will make a notable difference.

3) Converting a 12V boat to 24V. My guess it that it's not worth it. Yes, I prefer 24V boats, but the there is SO much stuff that would have to be converted. On your engine it's not just the starter, but the solenoid too. And the stop solenoid. And the alternator. And if there are any control relays or if it's an electronically controlled engine, you are probably out of luck completely. Same with a generator. Mine has a bunch of control relays. Plus you have all the control panels for the main and generator. Then there is the thruster, windlass, inverter, all your chargers, all your electronics (some can probably run on 24V, but don't count on it. Then lights. Nave lights, spreader lights, house lights, engine room lights, closet lights, etc. etc. And fans. Got blowers for ER ventilation, lazarrette venting, bathroom vents, etc. What about smoke detectors, CO detectors, automatic fire extinguisher systems. I think it's a very long list. If I were doing it, I would probably segregate the inverter bank and only convert that to 24V. But I'd think real hard about how big a difference it would make before going down that path.
__________________

__________________
www.MVTanglewood.com
twistedtree is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-31-2014, 09:38 PM   #23
Wil
Veteran Member
 
City: Pacific NW
Country: US
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
Please explain to me where a properly designed 12V system lacks any of these except needing heavier wiring????
Ok, let me try to do that with specific examples. Inverters with 24v vs. 12v inputs run cooler & more efficiently, refrigeration compressors with 24v vs. 12v inputs run cooler and more efficiently, 24v anchor winches are more powerful than 12v winches with smaller wire runs. Using less current and more voltage is intrinsically more efficient and powerful. By its own definition, 24v is a more efficient and cooler-running system than 12v. Of course there's a limitation on how high one can go in DC voltage, but that isn't something I've researched. By the same logic, do you think a 6v system would be just as good as a 12v system? If not, that is exactly the same reason why I think 24v is better than 12v.

Here's a brief article by someone I greatly respect regarding electrical systems on boats--or entire very advanced long-range powerboats for that matter: SetSail» Blog Archive » Electrical Systems
Wil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-31-2014, 09:41 PM   #24
Wil
Veteran Member
 
City: Pacific NW
Country: US
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by djmarchand View Post
Wil:

Ok, we can agree to disagree about 24v DC systems. But can you please drop the "hybrid" term. That term connotes two different power sources like a combustion engine and a battery/motor system. What you are talking about isn't.

David
Makes sense. No more hybrid.
Wil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-31-2014, 10:49 PM   #25
Wil
Veteran Member
 
City: Pacific NW
Country: US
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 72
twistedtree,

Appreciate the reply. That's one long list of required conversions and is what I was wondering about. As mentioned in my opening post, I'm wondering just what is involved in the conversion, and whether technology has advanced enough that a retrofit is feasible and doable in a practical sense. Maybe it isn't. Per each of your points:

1) Agreed

2) The boat I'm looking at doesn't have AirCon, does have a clothes washer and fridge. Those would be the heaviest loads, though the washer is obviously very intermittent. Want to live on the boat in shorts and scandals anyhow. Is it possible to get away from battery chargers when on shore power--no, I'd guess running the little DC generator even if very quiet at the dock would quickly raise comments from the neighbors. But it wouldn't have to be a very big charger, as shore power can run inverter loads. Make the charger big enough to replentish power used by the 24v refrigeration system and maybe some more. You're right about fuel consumption vs. power output, I'd forgotten that. A given amount of fuel gives you so much power. So that leaves the underloading of the main propulsion engine (if it is the main source of battery replentishment) and perhaps even the generator, unless you've got some really big-ass 110v battery chargers (do they make 110v 300A battery chargers?).

I found a wind charger that I understand deals with what is both your (and my) objections, noise: superwind Gmbh . The output will never be enough for the typical wind conditions in a harbor, but I see it as only a device to stretch out the 'big-charging' intervals. Same with solar cells, though the technology has improved rapidly in the last few years. We hope to be on the hook alot on our eventual way to the Caribbean (my home stomping grounds) from PNW, so we plan on reducing our power footprint as much as possible commensurate with comfort. I think a smaller Krogen is amenable to that.

3) This is where the 12/24v system would be of real help. Don't convert any of the engine to 24v, leave it as-is. The 120hp Lehman is about as basic as it gets, like that. The DC generator would be one of the main expenditures. I see what you're saying: the breaker panels and the long list of all the 12v things I haven't thought of might be the biggest obstacle. That's one positive thing about a KK42; it's a pretty comfortable boat without getting into really complex and expensive systems. Of course, whittling away at the 24v system by what can be left as 12v eventually makes the whole exercise moot. That's why I started this thought experiment.

Thanks for the great input,
Wil
Wil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-31-2014, 11:09 PM   #26
Guru
 
twistedtree's Avatar
 
City: Gloucester, MA
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 3,197
Also keep in mind that there is a limit to how much power you can draw off the belt and pulley system on the main engine. If you can find the detailed specs for your engine it will tell you. It sounds like you have a Lehman, so perhaps calling American Diesel will get you an answer. It's not just about the belt size and puttin on a bigger belt, but also about side loading of the pulley bearings for the idler pulleys, water pump, etc. I'd guess it's in the range of 10% of full power, so that's 12hp for your 120 lehman. 12 HP will generate about 8 KW max. But the real numbers may be less than that. I've got a 190A 24V alternator and an 85A 24V alternator on my 325HP Deere engine, and I understand that's the max you can do. That comes out to 6.6kw
__________________
www.MVTanglewood.com
twistedtree is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2014, 12:17 AM   #27
Wil
Veteran Member
 
City: Pacific NW
Country: US
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 72
twistedtree,

Yes, if this deal goes through, it's a Lehman. I've spoken with Bob Smith about it and had the honour and great fun of attending one of his 'Lehman University' courses. A couple of ways to deal with the bearing sideload issue is using twin belts or going with a serp belt. Bob has the pulleys for a twin belt install. But that's a reason why I'd like to go with a small diesel water-cooled DC generator--it provides redundancy, and with a medium sized, large frame, heavy duty alternator (say 150A) on the engine I'd be in decent shape. The little DC guy would be doing most of the work and enjoy the optimal loading of its engine.

Had a look at your blog and really enjoyed the Watermakers and Shore Power Conversion sections. I want to put a watermaker on 'my' boat and the Spectra is now on my short list.

Is your charging system set up so that both engine alternators can dump into your house bank?

What other house bank recharge system(s) do you have?

Do you carry alot of 24v spares?

If your refrigeration is 24v, is it hard to come by?

Are other 24v appliances you might have hard to come by?

Ok, that's a bunch of questions , but it's not just-kicking-the-tires questions.
Wil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2014, 03:12 AM   #28
Guru
 
BruceK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 7,573
My previous boat was principally 24v. My current one is all 12v. I say "all" because the 24v one had a transformer to convert to 12v for the stuff that only readily comes in 12v. I seem to remember buying 24v nav light and anchor light bulbs at a truck place, and waiting for a 24v shower sump to be got in specially.
My (admittedly limited) understanding of 24v advantage is, less voltage drop. There is a reason most boats run 12v, and why many run mains type power producing gensets. Setting out to use 24v seems to add an extra layer of difficulty choosing/procuring items. That said, it will be Wil`s boat, and Wil, it`s your choice, and exploring the issues is a good thing.
__________________
BruceK
Island Gypsy 36 Europa "Doriana"
Sydney Australia
BruceK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2014, 05:05 AM   #29
TF Site Team
 
Peter B's Avatar
 
City: Brisbane
Country: Australia
Vessel Name: Lotus
Vessel Model: Clipper (CHB) 34 Sedan/Europa style
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 6,669
Send a message via Skype™ to Peter B
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wil View Post
Ok, let me try to do that with specific examples. Inverters with 24v vs. 12v inputs run cooler & more efficiently, refrigeration compressors with 24v vs. 12v inputs run cooler and more efficiently, 24v anchor winches are more powerful than 12v winches with smaller wire runs. Using less current and more voltage is intrinsically more efficient and powerful. By its own definition, 24v is a more efficient and cooler-running system than 12v. Of course there's a limitation on how high one can go in DC voltage, but that isn't something I've researched.
Just a couple of thoughts here. If the above, (highlighted), is true, why did the US persist with 120vAC for the domestic reticulation, when the rest of the world largely uses 240vAC..?

Also, why is 12v DC the norm for almost all non-AC purposes..? I suspect it is the ease of building 12v batteries, and the fact there are so many non-marine 12v appliances, (e.g. all/most recreational road vehicles), such that it is much more expensive to produce 24v appliances for relatively minor gains.

Finally, we, like you, wanted to avoid AC on the boat, so the only AC we use is for at-berth charging and to pre-heat the hot water before cast-off. The rest is off-engine charging, solar panels, and Airbreeze wind to augment that when the sun is down/obscured. We cook with propane, and have LED lights, and a small inverter for e.g., laptop charging. We are therefore very self-sufficient at anchor - virtually indefinitely.
It means we don't have aircon, and we don't run washing machines or dishwashers, but with only two of us, it works for us.

I certainly feel you could achieve all you want without the complication & cost of adding in the 24v side of things, but the DC diesel charger makes sense if you want to run much AC off an inverter. Solar and air power would struggle to cope with that.
__________________
Pete
Peter B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2014, 06:52 AM   #30
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,913
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wil View Post
Ok, let me try to do that with specific examples. Inverters with 24v vs. 12v inputs run cooler & more efficiently, refrigeration compressors with 24v vs. 12v inputs run cooler and more efficiently, 24v anchor winches are more powerful than 12v winches with smaller wire runs. Using less current and more voltage is intrinsically more efficient and powerful. By its own definition, 24v is a more efficient and cooler-running system than 12v. Of course there's a limitation on how high one can go in DC voltage, but that isn't something I've researched. By the same logic, do you think a 6v system would be just as good as a 12v system? If not, that is exactly the same reason why I think 24v is better than 12v.

Here's a brief article by someone I greatly respect regarding electrical systems on boats--or entire very advanced long-range powerboats for that matter: SetSail» Blog Archive » Electrical Systems
yes..yes...I think most here understand basic electricity...

I would think that if there was that much to gain by switching....12V systems would be a thing of the past.

The ACTUAL gains may be insignificant if 12V systems are wired correctly or slightly oversized. Based on wiring charts I use...there's a lot of latitude.

I'd love to see some actual "cooler running" numbers for the average boat.

Work is still work... and if you efficiently transmit 12V or 24V....and the losses are minimalized....woopie compared to the redoing, searching for and stocking everything to 24V.

Again...new boat - maybe 24V...old boat...12V it would stay.
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2014, 07:20 AM   #31
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,530
The only item that is a power hog on most boats is the refrigeration system.

Sure boaters in the south ma require air cond 24/7 , but they mostly accept the need for a couple of gensets , and not much battery power.

A boat with a propane reefer and freezer , and range only requires minor electric for anchored out weeks or months. WE DO IT!

Why bother with multiple electric systems , thousands of pounds and dollars of aging batt sets ?

Any big juice eater like a water maker can operate when the laundry is being done.

Larger FW tanks and no watermaker to buy/install/maintain/repair.

Why the need? What lifestyle is the Desirement????
FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2014, 07:34 AM   #32
TF Site Team
 
Peter B's Avatar
 
City: Brisbane
Country: Australia
Vessel Name: Lotus
Vessel Model: Clipper (CHB) 34 Sedan/Europa style
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 6,669
Send a message via Skype™ to Peter B
Absolutely. Sometimes I am in total agreement with FF, and this is one of them...
__________________
Pete
Peter B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2014, 08:44 AM   #33
Guru
 
caltexflanc's Avatar
 
City: North Carolina for now
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Small Incentive
Vessel Model: Boston Whaler 130 Sport
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 3,801
Agree, that's the bottom line, what is this boat going to be used for and where?

I see so many newbies spending a lot of time and money getting the boat to match what they think it should have based on reading and dreaming and other people's opinions (which are based, at best, on how they happen to use their boat, and/or their budget.).

I was a little bit like that when we got the Hatt, but I had a clear view of what we were going to do and basically needed to do that. My extraneous enthusiasm was tempered by the guy who owned the yard where I was getting to know and outfit the boat, a process he was profiting nicely from. At one point he said, look, you've got your basics done, cruise the boat for awhile and then you'll know what "nice to haves" you really want. Seven years later, about half the stuff on the original list never got done and most of that was off the list completely.
__________________
George

"There's the Right Way, the Wrong Way, and what some guy says he's gotten away with"
caltexflanc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2014, 01:44 PM   #34
Guru
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 1,291
The way to get a feel for what does and does not come in 24 v is to browse a comprehensive marine catalog and check on the descriptions of the products. On our boat there may be a half dozen things that we had to convert to 12v. Sound system- alarm -gauges etc. Also remember that motors and their peripherals have to be tuned in to the 24v.
eyschulman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2014, 01:55 PM   #35
Guru
 
Ski in NC's Avatar
 
City: Wilmington, NC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Louisa
Vessel Model: Custom Built 38
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 3,888
Just an engineering tidbit: The reason you see 24v in larger boats is that for big engines, a 12v starter is physically too big to fit next to the engine block and catch the flywheel. 24v starters use thinner windings and so can make more torque out of a smaller machine. So big boats with big engines usually get 24v. If they could have managed with 12v, they probably would.

So once the engine has to have a 24v start bank, what to do with the rest of the boat? Wire it for 24v and get boxed in with limited supply of 24v doo-dads, or have a separate bank of 12v and an endless supply of doo-dads? Some go one way, some the other.

My preference for big engines that require 24v to start is to have a bank for just that purpose, and 12v for the rest of the boat. Some engines can easily handle a second alternator and that makes it easy.

Once you get into really big house banks with the goal of avoiding an AC generator, you are entering the realm of electrical engineering and this system really needs to be designed. Not just gathering bits of knowledge from the net.
Ski in NC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2014, 02:25 PM   #36
Wil
Veteran Member
 
City: Pacific NW
Country: US
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter B View Post
why did the US persist with 120vAC for the domestic reticulation, when the rest of the world largely uses 240vAC..?
Had to look up reticulation . Not sure what you're saying here, I think you made my point. The US made an incorrect decision using 120vac, the ROW uses it because it is more efficient and provides the same amount of work for half the current. Reduces losses all around. Why our long transmission lines are in the 100,000vac or some such area. Maybe because our government thought we weren't smart enough to handle 240vac safely. The US has made other decisions like this, sealed beam headlamps vs H4s come to mind. Our government is not infallible by any means.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter B View Post
Also, why is 12v DC the norm for almost all non-AC purposes..? I suspect it is the ease of building 12v batteries, and the fact there are so many non-marine 12v appliances, (e.g. all/most recreational road vehicles), such that it is much more expensive to produce 24v appliances for relatively minor gains.
Yes, the norm issue. And it might very well be the reason why I don't go to 24v--not enough availability of hardware and appliances. The manufacturers don't go into 24v items big-time because there isn't enough demand for them; there isn't enough demand for them because they aren't mass produced at more attractive prices by the manufacturers. And it very well could be that there aren't enough efficiency and power gains to make the switch to 24v for smaller boats worthwhile. There was a time when 6v was the norm, everything DC manufactured was 6v. 12v was upsetting the apple cart. Perhaps we are at that stage for 12v now, perhaps 12v will remain the norm for smaller boats well into the future. That is what I am in the process of feeling out.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter B View Post
Finally, we, like you, wanted to avoid AC on the boat, so the only AC we use is for at-berth charging and to pre-heat the hot water before cast-off. The rest is off-engine charging, solar panels, and Airbreeze wind to augment that when the sun is down/obscured. We cook with propane, and have LED lights, and a small inverter for e.g., laptop charging. We are therefore very self-sufficient at anchor - virtually indefinitely. It means we don't have aircon, and we don't run washing machines or dishwashers, but with only two of us, it works for us.
That is where we are headed too. The heavy power consumers we will have on the hook are the washing machine and refrigeration, no AirCon.

How do you handle your refrigeration needs while on the hook?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter B View Post
I certainly feel you could achieve all you want without the complication & cost of adding in the 24v side of things, but the DC diesel charger makes sense if you want to run much AC off an inverter. Solar and air power would struggle to cope with that.
It very well might be the case that I stick with 12v, it's what the boat has now, and it works. The small DC water-cooled diesel engine genset, a couple more batteries, and another inverter if required (there's one on the boat now) will be the first major change I make, if I do anything at all. Then a wind generator and solar cells, the roof of a KK42 pilothouse is a nice space for it. Might not be enough space to make much difference though, even with the better solar panels coming out now.
Wil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2014, 02:40 PM   #37
Wil
Veteran Member
 
City: Pacific NW
Country: US
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by FF View Post
The only item that is a power hog on most boats is the refrigeration system.
Sure boaters in the south ma require air cond 24/7 , but they mostly accept the need for a couple of gensets, and not much battery power.
A boat with a propane reefer and freezer, and range only requires minor electric for anchored out weeks or months. WE DO IT!
Why bother with multiple electric systems, thousands of pounds and dollars of aging batt sets?
Any big juice eater like a water maker can operate when the laundry is being done.
Larger FW tanks and no watermaker to buy/install/maintain/repair.
Why the need? What lifestyle is the Desirement????
Absolutely agreed also. That is what I started out wanting for our boat's refrigeration--one of the Absorption Cycle types. We used to have a kerosene fridge when I was a kid. It worked, but not very well. I don't know of any Absorption Cycle marine refrigerators.

I'd guess your propane refrigerator and freezer are RV models, are you genuinely happy with their performance? If so, what make/models did you settle on? Is rolling while underway an issue?
How about an Icemaker--now there's an invention, an Absorption Cycle icemaker.
Wil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2014, 03:07 PM   #38
Wil
Veteran Member
 
City: Pacific NW
Country: US
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by eyschulman View Post
The way to get a feel for what does and does not come in 24 v is to browse a comprehensive marine catalog and check on the descriptions of the products. On our boat there may be a half dozen things that we had to convert to 12v. Sound system- alarm -gauges etc. Also remember that motors and their peripherals have to be tuned in to the 24v.
Excellent points. Proposal: 24v for the heavier power consumers--refrigeration, anchor winch, etc., 12v for the rest. More complication, maybe not worth the performance gains. Especially if I could find good models of absorption cycle fridges & freezers. Now that would be cool (oy vey).
Wil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2014, 03:28 PM   #39
Guru
 
Ski in NC's Avatar
 
City: Wilmington, NC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Louisa
Vessel Model: Custom Built 38
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 3,888
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wil View Post
Absolutely agreed also. That is what I started out wanting for our boat's refrigeration--one of the Absorption Cycle types. We used to have a kerosene fridge when I was a kid. It worked, but not very well. I don't know of any Absorption Cycle marine refrigerators.

I'd guess your propane refrigerator and freezer are RV models, are you genuinely happy with their performance? If so, what make/models did you settle on? Is rolling while underway an issue?
How about an Icemaker--now there's an invention, an Absorption Cycle icemaker.
Watch or read "Mosquito Coast"!!!!
Ski in NC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2014, 03:34 PM   #40
Wil
Veteran Member
 
City: Pacific NW
Country: US
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ski in NC View Post
Just an engineering tidbit: The reason you see 24v in larger boats is that for big engines, a 12v starter is physically too big to fit next to the engine block and catch the flywheel. 24v starters use thinner windings and so can make more torque out of a smaller machine. So big boats with big engines usually get 24v. If they could have managed with 12v, they probably would.
Exactly. Thinner windings and more torque out of smaller motors. One of the advantages of 24v. They would have stayed with 12v anchor winches and whatever other heavy duty equipment they use, despite being able to get the same power out of smaller and I suspect more reliable (half the current, so cooler running) 24v motors? A larger diameter flywheel would have solved the larger 12v starter motor issue, but 24v was used due to "thinner windings and so can make more torque out of a smaller machine". Two advantages in one--smaller size for the same power, uses half the current.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ski in NC View Post
So once the engine has to have a 24v start bank, what to do with the rest of the boat? Wire it for 24v and get boxed in with limited supply of 24v doo-dads, or have a separate bank of 12v and an endless supply of doo-dads? Some go one way, some the other.
That's the crux of the issue--the lack of availability of the more commonly required 12v items. It's an unfortunate paradox: the manufacturers won't make the 24v items due to lack of demand; consumers don't demand them due to lack of supply.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ski in NC View Post
My preference for big engines that require 24v to start is to have a bank for just that purpose, and 12v for the rest of the boat. Some engines can easily handle a second alternator and that makes it easy.
That is one nice way out of the 12/24v charging issue.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ski in NC View Post
Once you get into really big house banks with the goal of avoiding an AC generator, you are entering the realm of electrical engineering and this system really needs to be designed. Not just gathering bits of knowledge from the net.
I have no further interest in burning my boat down than you. Of course it would be a very professionally thought out system, if undertaken.
__________________

Wil is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:32 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012