Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-28-2013, 11:59 AM   #41
Guru
 
Tony B's Avatar
 
City: Joe Wheeler State Park, Al
Country: Cruising/Live-Aboard USA
Vessel Name: Serenity
Vessel Model: Mainship 36 Dual Cabin -1986
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 1,250
Quote:
Originally Posted by neworleansrich View Post
......Try tuning to 14.300 MHZ for the Marine Mobile Service Net during daylight hours Maritime Mobile Service Network to get an idea of the wonderful free service these volunteers provide.
The services provided free by volunteers on 14.300 (HAM frequency) is invaluable. If you have satcom and can receive the Weather Channnel on your TV then you probably wont have a need for their services. Otherwise, they are great folks. They will relay weather info to you from ships in your area, they will relay phone messages and whatever from your family and friends and if they have someone handy with a patch, they will patch a phone line through for you. They will also phone people for you. If you want, they will also add you onto shiptrac.org where they will post your position, course, eta, etc and any notes you would like posted. All your friends and family have to do is get on shiptrac.org and look up your call sign number and all that info will be available.
Came in handy one time during a gulf crossing. We hit a really bad storm and our antennas were down. We lost communications with everyone for a few days and we knew everyone on land would be worried. I strung up a wire when I could and got on 14.300 and left message. Hit storm, lost communications, everything and everyone is OK just lost radio for a few days. When everyone saw the message they were relieved. On that trip I was about 59 years old and I was the 'kid', so you could see the concern.
Last time I knew of, the maritime net on 14.300 was not on 24 hours a day, but were regularly scheduled throughout the day. Oh, and when we were one day out and knew our ETA they called family members to meet us - myself and 3 friends, one from St. Louis, one from Dallas and one from Slidell, La. I stayed with my boat in it's new home in Kemah, Tx.
__________________
Advertisement

__________________
Cruising the Eastern U.S. Inland Waterways and Gulf Coast. Presently on the ICW in Louisiana and heading Back to Texas.
Tony B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2013, 12:01 PM   #42
Guru
 
N4712's Avatar
 
City: South FL
Country: U.S.A
Vessel Name: Oliver
Vessel Model: Nordhavn 47 Hull# 12
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 3,613
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony B View Post
The services provided free by volunteers on 14.300 (HAM frequency) is invaluable. If you have satcom and can receive the Weather Channnel on your TV then you probably wont have a need for their services. Otherwise, they are great folks. They will relay weather info to you from ships in your area, they will relay phone messages and whatever from your family and friends and if they have someone handy with a patch, they will patch a phone line through for you. They will also phone people for you. If you want, they will also add you onto shiptrac.org where they will post your position, course, eta, etc and any notes you would like posted. All your friends and family have to do is get on shiptrac.org and look up your call sign number and all that info will be available. Came in handy one time during a gulf crossing. We hit a really bad storm and our antennas were down. We lost communications with everyone for a few days and we knew everyone on land would be worried. I strung up a wire when I could and got on 14.300 and left message. Hit storm, lost communications, everything and everyone is OK just lost radio for a few days. When everyone saw the message they were relieved. On that trip I was about 59 years old and I was the 'kid', so you could see the concern. Last time I knew of, the maritime net on 14.300 was not on 24 hours a day, but were regularly scheduled throughout the day. Oh, and when we were one day out and knew our ETA they called family members to meet us - myself and 3 friends, one from St. Louis, one from Dallas and one from Slidell, La. I stayed with my boat in it's new home in Kemah, Tx.
Yes we are going to get Sat Tv. Who would've know the sat domes on N4712 were purely there for aesthetics (there both empty).
__________________

__________________
Thanks, Oliver
M/V Oliver
Nordhavn 47 Hull #12
N4712 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2013, 12:34 PM   #43
TF Site Team
 
Bay Pelican's Avatar
 
City: Chicago, IL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Bay Pelican
Vessel Model: Krogen 42
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,793
Quote:
Originally Posted by N4712 View Post
Yes we are going to get Sat Tv. Who would've know the sat domes on N4712 were purely there for aesthetics (there both empty).

If you are going past the Northern Bahamas, make sure you get a 24" antenna or larger. Also you will need to swap out the LNB once you leave the Bahamas. Latin American Directv (assume same for Dish) uses a different LNB.

Marty
Bay Pelican is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2013, 12:38 PM   #44
Guru
 
N4712's Avatar
 
City: South FL
Country: U.S.A
Vessel Name: Oliver
Vessel Model: Nordhavn 47 Hull# 12
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 3,613
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bay Pelican View Post
If you are going past the Northern Bahamas, make sure you get a 24" antenna or larger. Also you will need to swap out the LNB once you leave the Bahamas. Latin American Directv (assume same for Dish) uses a different LNB. Marty
Yes, I believe the M5 by KvH is 24" dish, I'll have to check.
__________________
Thanks, Oliver
M/V Oliver
Nordhavn 47 Hull #12
N4712 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2013, 12:43 PM   #45
Guru
 
BobH's Avatar
 
City: Montgomery, TX
Country: USA
Vessel Model: None, but looking
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 779
But if you turn them all off before you start, you'll never which ones, if any, cause interference.

Bob
BobH is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2013, 01:29 PM   #46
TF Site Team
 
Bay Pelican's Avatar
 
City: Chicago, IL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Bay Pelican
Vessel Model: Krogen 42
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,793
Quote:
Originally Posted by BobH View Post
But if you turn them all off before you start, you'll never which ones, if any, cause interference.

Bob
Bob

You are correct. The way that I have done this is to turn everything off, and then turn things on one by one. It took me two years to find my water maker display panel problem because I never thought to turn it off until a friend insisted that everything been turned off, and he meant everything.

Marty
Bay Pelican is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2013, 03:22 PM   #47
Guru
 
Tidahapah's Avatar
 
City: Mooloolaba
Country: Australia
Vessel Name: Tidahapah
Vessel Model: Bert Ellis Timber motor cruiser
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,779
Marty,
You are dead right, that is the standard procedure we use down here as well.
It can be surprising what may be causing the smallest amount of interference, eliminating them all from the start gives you a good base and an idea of how good your radio set up is.
Cheers
Benn
__________________
"When I die I hope my wife doesn't sell my toys for what I told her I paid for them"
Money: It's made round to go round , not flat to stack.
"Get out and do it"
Tidahapah is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2013, 04:53 PM   #48
Guru
 
BobH's Avatar
 
City: Montgomery, TX
Country: USA
Vessel Model: None, but looking
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 779
I still think that if you have interference on receive, you have a wiring problem, DC power and ground, antenna or ground plane. We had battery charger/inverter, battery monitor, DC fridge, fluorescent lights and never had a problem on receive. never had a problem with the Pactor modem receiving email, weather reports, GRIB files, etc. Only problem was on transmit driving the autopilot crazy.

Bob
BobH is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2013, 05:35 PM   #49
Guru
 
N4712's Avatar
 
City: South FL
Country: U.S.A
Vessel Name: Oliver
Vessel Model: Nordhavn 47 Hull# 12
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 3,613
Oh I failed to mention the boat came with a skymate have to check that out.
__________________
Thanks, Oliver
M/V Oliver
Nordhavn 47 Hull #12
N4712 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2013, 06:03 PM   #50
Senior Member
 
MikeD's Avatar
 
City: Port Havelock
Country: New Zealand
Vessel Name: Siesta
Vessel Model: Pelin Sterling 36
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by N4712 View Post
Oh I failed to mention the boat came with a skymate have to check that out.
it looks like you got all the good toys!!
__________________
Mike

"To fish or not to fish, what a silly question. "
MikeD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2013, 07:12 PM   #51
Guru
 
N4712's Avatar
 
City: South FL
Country: U.S.A
Vessel Name: Oliver
Vessel Model: Nordhavn 47 Hull# 12
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 3,613
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Dilger View Post
it looks like you got all the good toys!!
Yeah, I'm glad we weren't the people that put all the cool and perplexing toys in. anyone use a skymate before?
__________________
Thanks, Oliver
M/V Oliver
Nordhavn 47 Hull #12
N4712 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2013, 09:08 PM   #52
Guru
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 511
Dumb question alert.....Is the marine SSB the same as land based stuff? I.E. If I get a SSB/CB for my Jeep will it have the same capabilities (range not withstanding) as a marine version? Cobra makes a model that has both CB and SSB for not much more than I was looking at spending when I finish my latest and likely last Jeep project. I'm going all out and its getting all the goodies I've ever wanted Cummins diesel, 1 ton axles/driveline, lockers F/R, double beadlocked 37" tires, 1/2 cab, HD bumpers, Warn 8724 winch, etc. I was curious about the SSB so this is a timely thread for me-though my questions aren't marine based per se.
__________________
TIME well wasted
34' Mainship III
Cape Coral, FL
twiisted71 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2013, 11:03 AM   #53
Senior Member
 
City: Tampa, FL
Country: USA
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 245
SSB is a mode of transmission. AM and FM are other modes of transmission that you have probably heard of. You can use any of these modes on any frequency.

For example, you may think of "FM radio" as those FM frequencies that the radio in your car can receive. But FM is just a mode, and can be used on any frequency. The marine VHF radios that we all use are FM radios. They do not transmit on the same frequencies as the radio in your car, but they use the same, FM mode for their transmissions.

SSB is the mode that is used on the marine HF (high frequency, as opposed to VHF--very high frequency) channels. As such, the radios that are made for transmitting and receiving on the marine HF channels are commonly called "SSB" radios.

"Normal" CB transmissions are done using the AM mode. The Cobra radio you are asking about transmits and receives on the CB frequencies, but is capable of using SSB mode as well as AM mode on those frequencies. These are NOT the same frequencies used by the marine SSB channels. Hence, no, your Cobra SSB will not work on the marine SSB channels.
denverd0n is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2013, 11:24 AM   #54
Guru
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 511
I understand the dynamics of frequency and amplitude as means of specifying "channels" of communication waves. And UHF, VHF, and HF ranges. All I was asking was if the land based CB/SSB device operated in the same areas as marine SSB. Since Ham radio operation doesn't differentiate what's under your feet it seemed plausible that SSB communication wouldn't either as they are similar systems.
Thanks for clarifying that I couldn't use my CB/SSB transceiver to communicate with my boat or other boating buddies if using a marine SSB unit. That's too bad since SSB seems to be using such a small percentage of its potential why they won't allow the two systems to overlap. I'm sure they would self differentiate by channels just as VHF has for pleasure vs commercial vs emergency traffic.
__________________
TIME well wasted
34' Mainship III
Cape Coral, FL
twiisted71 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2013, 07:05 PM   #55
Guru
 
Tony B's Avatar
 
City: Joe Wheeler State Park, Al
Country: Cruising/Live-Aboard USA
Vessel Name: Serenity
Vessel Model: Mainship 36 Dual Cabin -1986
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 1,250
Twisted;

Radios get nick-names like everything else. The nick-names just caught on just the same way nick-names stick to people. They are not the real names. CB being one of the exceptions. When I was kid, most HAM radios were either receivers (also called "short wave radios") or transmitters. Transceivers were not popular due to a lot of technical reasons as well as marketing.
The transmitters whether manufactured or home made had stringent requirements to make sure they didn't bleed into areas they were not allotted to use. Receivers didn't matter because they were not regulated. And so, everyone had their own band of frequencies they were allowed to use.
Eventually, along comes the popularity of transceivers. Since different licensing is required for different bands of frequencies, industry decided to make sure that there could be no mistakes made. Not sure but probably this was legislated. If you bought a HAM transceiver, you could receive everything within its wide range of frequencies.
This typically was very low frequencies which is below normal AM radio, all the way up to and slightly beyond CB frequencies. However, you could only transmit on HAM frequencies, and outside of that the other frequencies such as marine bands, CB normal AM radio and others were physically blocked from transmitting.
What we call marine band radios (other than VHF) could receives that same as most HAM radios could but only transmit on Marine frequencies with everything else blocked from transmitting. CB radios were cheap and made for CB only so not questions there. Since most Marine band frequencies are generally SSB, people refer to them as SSB radios when in fact they are Marine Band Radios. My HAM radio will transmit SSB, AM, FM and CW(carrier wave used for Morse Code) and I must use the appropriate form of transmission for the frequencies I transmit on.
Hope that almost explains it.
__________________
Cruising the Eastern U.S. Inland Waterways and Gulf Coast. Presently on the ICW in Louisiana and heading Back to Texas.
Tony B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2013, 08:03 PM   #56
Guru
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 511
So essentially SSB is just another "range/level" within the same frequency band widths as the typically more popular comm devices in that realm?
Any idea what ship to shore radio used back in the day? That's how we got to call or get calls from home back when I worked offshore. It was an "open" channel and everyone could hear everyone else on that freq and everyone basically took turns using the airwaves. This was all over the Gulf of Mex not just my rig! People sure were more considerate back then-I couldn't imagine trying to do that now-a-days with the "kids" they'll have filling my shoes now!
__________________
TIME well wasted
34' Mainship III
Cape Coral, FL
twiisted71 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2013, 09:38 PM   #57
Guru
 
Tony B's Avatar
 
City: Joe Wheeler State Park, Al
Country: Cruising/Live-Aboard USA
Vessel Name: Serenity
Vessel Model: Mainship 36 Dual Cabin -1986
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 1,250
I am not sure what your question is, but to simplify it - there is a great range of frequencies - everything from sound we hear with out ears right up to light rays and beyond. Somewhere in there are what we designated are radio frequencies. Initially, technology dictated what frequencies could be used and how. Then from there frequency ranges (bands) were allocated for various uses such as AM/FM radio, TV, Microwave RADAR, todays cell towers and all sorts of stuff. The type of signal such as SSB, AM, FM etc. has to do with efficiency and quality of sound at certain frequencies. As we run out of frequencies available, new technology tends to come up with more efficiency of transmission equipment. The gov. also looks at which frequencies get used the most and the least. The ones that get used the least get re-allocated for a different purpose. SSB is just a fairly efficient form of transmission at certain frequencies. When it comes to the frequencies that we commonly use for HAM and SSB Marine bands, the frequencies we choose to use have to do with the time of day. Long distance communications tend to collapse on the higher frequencies and improve on the lower frequencies as the sun goes down. Has to do with the ionosphere. Lower frequencies such as normal AM radio improve greatly during the evening. Different stations have allocated frequencies they can use so they don't step on top of each other otherwise all you hear would be static.
Communications are dependant of skip waves and the lower frequencies perform better. Anyway, because of this, marine SSB bands are in different places on the dial so you will always some communication with someone at a distance.

The only ship to shore I am familiar with in the Gulf of Mex is on the VHF frequencies. They were on some of the upper channels I believe. When I worked on boats. I would just swing off on ropes to a platform and use their phones all I wanted. The ship to shore VHF would cost several dollars a minute. I'm sure there were other lower frequencies in use I am just not aware of them.

Most of this is from memory which ain't all that great - lost too many brain cells in the 60's. So while I may not be technically correct, I'm still giving you the general idea - I think.

Are you now more confused than before? Sorry.
__________________
Cruising the Eastern U.S. Inland Waterways and Gulf Coast. Presently on the ICW in Louisiana and heading Back to Texas.
Tony B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2013, 10:25 AM   #58
Veteran Member
 
neworleansrich's Avatar
 
City: New Orleans
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Catalyst
Vessel Model: 50 ft Power Cat
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 77
Regarding Sat TV, I have never seen a wind or wave forecast on ANY TV channel. Maybe you might get a glimpse of an approaching cold front in winter or a hurricane in summer, but anything in between, forget it. SAT TV IS NOT A SUBSTITUTE FOR REAL WEATHER INFO.

Assuming you are cruising the Bahamas and Caribbean the following are the best sources of relevant weather information. By relevant I mean a) is anything really nasty approaching, b) what is the wind direction and wave height tomorrow, and the next day.

a) XM Weather via a Garmin type receiver: Very convenient, low subscription fee, coverage down to lower Caribbean.

b) Weather via the internet (like Sailflow.com): Great when you can get on the internet in a marina or on shore, better if you have Sat Internet.

c) WEFAX via SSB: Takes some effort to get set up and get familiar with the schedule, but portable and no coverage limits.

The only weather source WORSE than the Weather Channel is the prognostication from the guy in the boat in the next slip.
neworleansrich is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2013, 10:31 AM   #59
Guru
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 511
LOL yep done more Tarzan imitations than I care to remember. I was a roughneck/roustabout and crane operator at various times. Shoulda stayed with it as I was on the track to be a rig/platform bo$$. Electronics are generally clear as mud to me anyway so it'd be hard to confuse me more! Airwaves are just an extension of the blur when talking about radios. Thankfully I can't screw up airwaves!
__________________
TIME well wasted
34' Mainship III
Cape Coral, FL
twiisted71 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2013, 12:19 PM   #60
Guru
 
Tony B's Avatar
 
City: Joe Wheeler State Park, Al
Country: Cruising/Live-Aboard USA
Vessel Name: Serenity
Vessel Model: Mainship 36 Dual Cabin -1986
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 1,250
Quote:
Originally Posted by twiisted71 View Post
........ Thankfully I can't screw up airwaves!
Yeah, right! LOL

I just retired last year and thinking of going back out for a while. I actually miss some of it and it kept me in good shape. I had to keep up with men 1/2 my age. That's my cover story and I'm sticking to it. I am/was a protective coatings inspector. The $$ is very good and can't be spent until I hit the beach.

Basically, you can't screw up much - famous last words.
Just figure out what and who you want to talk to and what frequencies they are on and buy the radio accordingly. Turn the dial and the radio does most of the work.

When I was active about 10 years ago, most sailboat nets were on HAM frequencies. When in the Caribbean we would check in with each other almost every morning. If nothing else but to see that all was OK. Had fun chatting with other cruisers that I never met in person even though we all knew where the others were. If we had a bad blow at night we would check each other in the morning.

My HAM radio was modified to transmit on all frequencies including
marine bands. Technically illegal but I never used the marine bands anyway and nice to have in case of an emergency. Truth be known, in an emergency I would rather have 100 HAMs scattered around the world know where I am than just the CG. Lots of civilians can put pressure on the CG if need be.

The HAM radio tests are easy and Morse Code is no longer required. You can buy books from the ARRL which pretty much teach the test.

I don't know the demographics today but 10 years or so ago, most HAMs I talked to were old WW II radio operators and a lot of shut-ins. I think HAM is dying a slow death due to the internet and cell phones, but still fun.
__________________

__________________
Cruising the Eastern U.S. Inland Waterways and Gulf Coast. Presently on the ICW in Louisiana and heading Back to Texas.
Tony B is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:21 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012