Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-27-2013, 09:56 AM   #21
TF Site Team
 
Larry M's Avatar
 
City: JAX, FL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Hobo
Vessel Model: Krogen 42-120
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 5,737
If you go to the Bahamas you will need a license for your VHF and the SSB, EPRIB etc. can be part of the lience.

FCC: Wireless Services: Ship Radio Stations: Licensing

Who Needs a Ship Station License




You do not need a license to operate a marine VHF radio, radar, or EPIRBs aboard voluntary ships operating domestically. The term "voluntary ships" refers to ships that are not required by law to carry a radio. Generally, this term applies to recreation or pleasure craft. The term "voluntary ships" does not apply to the following:
  1. Cargo ships over 300 gross tons navigating in the open sea;
  2. Ships certified by the U.S. Coast Guard to carry more than 6 passengers for hire in the open sea or tidewaters of the U.S.;
  3. Power driven ships over 20 meters in length on navigable waterways;
  4. Ships of more than 100 gross tons certified by the U.S. Coast Guard to carry at least one passenger on navigable waterways;
  5. Tow boats of more than 7.8 meters in length on navigable waterways; and,
  6. Uninspected commercial fishing industry vessels required to carry a VHF radio.
  7. Ships required to carry an Automatic Identification System (AIS) transceiver by the U.S. Coast Guard regulations enacted pursuant to the Maritime Transportation Security Act of 2000.
Ships are considered as operating domestically when they do not travel to foreign ports or do not transmit radio communications to foreign stations. Sailing in international waters is permitted, so long as the previous conditions are met. If you travel to a foreign port (e.g., Canada, Mexico, Bahamas, British Virgin Islands), a license is required. Additionally, if you travel to a foreign port, you are required to have an operator permit.
__________________
Advertisement

Larry M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2013, 10:26 AM   #22
Veteran Member
 
neworleansrich's Avatar
 
City: New Orleans
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Catalyst
Vessel Model: 50 ft Power Cat
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 77
Unless you are cruising in an area with an active SSB Net, you may not find much to listen to on the SSB frequencies. Further, in an emergency it may be hard or impossible to raise any other station, CG or private, due to the relatively few stations listening 24/7. I have two suggestions that will make your SSB radio much more useful:

1) There are free computer programs (Google "Free weatherfax programs") that you can download to allow you to receive free Weather Fax broadcasts Marine Radiofax charts The only equipment you will need other than the SSB and computer is an audio cable. I find the Wind/Wave predictions on these charts very accurate for the Gulf and Bahamas. When you are out of internet range, this free service is priceless.

2) TonyB is correct: Get a General HAM license (no code test required) American Radio Relay League | ARRL - The national association for AMATEUR RADIO It is legal to transmit on HAM frequencies using a SSB radio with a HAM license (However, it is NOT legal to transmit on SSB frequencies using a HAM radio). Most SSB radios can be set up to transmit and receive on the HAM frequencies, though the set up can be a bit of a fiddle (information on how to do it is all over the internet). The propagation of HF radio (SSB and HAM) is all about the atmospheric skip. With the large number of HAM operators out there, it is quite easy to find someone at the perfect distance to which you can communicate. Further, there are wonderful people who man the various HAM NETS eager to help any mariner with any issue.

Try tuning to 14.300 MHZ for the Marine Mobile Service Net during daylight hours Maritime Mobile Service Network to get an idea of the wonderful free service these volunteers provide.
__________________

neworleansrich is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2013, 10:42 AM   #23
Guru
 
N4712's Avatar
 
City: South FL
Country: U.S.A
Vessel Name: Oliver
Vessel Model: Nordhavn 47 Hull# 12
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 3,613
Quote:
Originally Posted by denverd0n View Post
No, you are free to listen without any forms required. You only need to register with the FCC if you wish to transmit.
Oh ok, thanks for clarifying.
__________________
Thanks, Oliver
M/V Oliver
Nordhavn 47 Hull #12
N4712 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2013, 10:45 AM   #24
Guru
 
N4712's Avatar
 
City: South FL
Country: U.S.A
Vessel Name: Oliver
Vessel Model: Nordhavn 47 Hull# 12
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 3,613
Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry M View Post
If you go to the Bahamas you will need a license for your VHF and the SSB, EPRIB etc. can be part of the lience. FCC: Wireless Services: Ship Radio Stations: Licensing Who Needs a Ship Station License You do not need a license to operate a marine VHF radio, radar, or EPIRBs aboard voluntary ships operating domestically. The term "voluntary ships" refers to ships that are not required by law to carry a radio. Generally, this term applies to recreation or pleasure craft. The term "voluntary ships" does not apply to the following:[*]Cargo ships over 300 gross tons navigating in the open sea;[*]Ships certified by the U.S. Coast Guard to carry more than 6 passengers for hire in the open sea or tidewaters of the U.S.;[*]Power driven ships over 20 meters in length on navigable waterways;[*]Ships of more than 100 gross tons certified by the U.S. Coast Guard to carry at least one passenger on navigable waterways;[*]Tow boats of more than 7.8 meters in length on navigable waterways; and,[*]Uninspected commercial fishing industry vessels required to carry a VHF radio.[*]Ships required to carry an Automatic Identification System (AIS) transceiver by the U.S. Coast Guard regulations enacted pursuant to the Maritime Transportation Security Act of 2000. Ships are considered as operating domestically when they do not travel to foreign ports or do not transmit radio communications to foreign stations. Sailing in international waters is permitted, so long as the previous conditions are met. If you travel to a foreign port (e.g., Canada, Mexico, Bahamas, British Virgin Islands), a license is required. Additionally, if you travel to a foreign port, you are required to have an operator permit.
Thanks for the info! So I need an license for my VHF in the Bahamas? Never had one neither has anyone I know that travels the Bahamas.
__________________
Thanks, Oliver
M/V Oliver
Nordhavn 47 Hull #12
N4712 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2013, 10:47 AM   #25
Guru
 
N4712's Avatar
 
City: South FL
Country: U.S.A
Vessel Name: Oliver
Vessel Model: Nordhavn 47 Hull# 12
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 3,613
Quote:
Originally Posted by neworleansrich View Post
Unless you are cruising in an area with an active SSB Net, you may not find much to listen to on the SSB frequencies. Further, in an emergency it may be hard or impossible to raise any other station, CG or private, due to the relatively few stations listening 24/7. I have two suggestions that will make your SSB radio much more useful: 1) There are free computer programs (Google "Free weatherfax programs") that you can download to allow you to receive free Weather Fax broadcasts Marine Radiofax charts The only equipment you will need other than the SSB and computer is an audio cable. I find the Wind/Wave predictions on these charts very accurate for the Gulf and Bahamas. When you are out of internet range, this free service is priceless. 2) TonyB is correct: Get a General HAM license (no code test required) American Radio Relay League | ARRL - The national association for AMATEUR RADIO It is legal to transmit on HAM frequencies using a SSB radio with a HAM license (However, it is NOT legal to transmit on SSB frequencies using a HAM radio). Most SSB radios can be set up to transmit and receive on the HAM frequencies, though the set up can be a bit of a fiddle (information on how to do it is all over the internet). The propagation of HF radio (SSB and HAM) is all about the atmospheric skip. With the large number of HAM operators out there, it is quite easy to find someone at the perfect distance to which you can communicate. Further, there are wonderful people who man the various HAM NETS eager to help any mariner with any issue. Try tuning to 14.300 MHZ for the Marine Mobile Service Net during daylight hours Maritime Mobile Service Network to get an idea of the wonderful free service these volunteers provide.
Thanks, I think I'm just going stick to listening in on broadcasts.
__________________
Thanks, Oliver
M/V Oliver
Nordhavn 47 Hull #12
N4712 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2013, 11:08 AM   #26
Guru
 
City: Carefree, Arizona
Country: usa
Vessel Name: sunchaser V
Vessel Model: DeFever 48
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 6,369
N4712

By virtue of buying your N47 you took a few steps into the serious cruisers realm. Being able to send and receive on SSB will serve to increase your safety at sea as well as providing general communications and daily weather updates. Venturing a few miles offshore and losing all of today's modern cellular technology is a reality. SSB offers a really simple and time proven substitute.

It sounds like your vessel is well equipped; enjoyng it and all the Nordhavn pluses will be exciting.
sunchaser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2013, 11:41 AM   #27
Guru
 
N4712's Avatar
 
City: South FL
Country: U.S.A
Vessel Name: Oliver
Vessel Model: Nordhavn 47 Hull# 12
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 3,613
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunchaser View Post
N4712 By virtue of buying your N47 you took a few steps into the serious cruisers realm. Being able to send and receive on SSB will serve to increase your safety at sea as well as providing general communications and daily weather updates. Venturing a few miles offshore and losing all of today's modern cellular technology is a reality. SSB offers a really simple and time proven substitute. It sounds like your vessel is well equipped; enjoyng it and all the Nordhavn pluses will be exciting.
Totally agree, for weather were going have the garmins which is excellent. Also I see a distress button that will work the same as a vhf right?
__________________
Thanks, Oliver
M/V Oliver
Nordhavn 47 Hull #12
N4712 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2013, 06:05 PM   #28
Guru
 
Tidahapah's Avatar
 
City: Mooloolaba
Country: Australia
Vessel Name: Tidahapah
Vessel Model: Bert Ellis Timber motor cruiser
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,779
Maybe you can clarify something for me re your weather info.
You say for weather you have your Garmins, what does that mean?
I know they make sounders/fish finders, plotters radars etc.

here in Aus for weather info we either get it from one of the suppliers via computer, BOM (Bureau of Meteorology ) Bouyweather and various other sites, over VHF from Marine Rescue Stations or via phone.
Once out of reach of these, about 30 miles off the coast it is down to sat phone or HF radio.

Cheers
Benn
__________________
"When I die I hope my wife doesn't sell my toys for what I told her I paid for them"
Money: It's made round to go round , not flat to stack.
"Get out and do it"
Tidahapah is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2013, 06:09 PM   #29
Senior Member
 
MikeD's Avatar
 
City: Port Havelock
Country: New Zealand
Vessel Name: Siesta
Vessel Model: Pelin Sterling 36
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 150
Benn

I think this is what they are talking about

XM
__________________
Mike

"To fish or not to fish, what a silly question. "
MikeD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2013, 06:44 PM   #30
Guru
 
N4712's Avatar
 
City: South FL
Country: U.S.A
Vessel Name: Oliver
Vessel Model: Nordhavn 47 Hull# 12
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 3,613
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tidahapah View Post
Maybe you can clarify something for me re your weather info. You say for weather you have your Garmins, what does that mean? I know they make sounders/fish finders, plotters radars etc. here in Aus for weather info we either get it from one of the suppliers via computer, BOM (Bureau of Meteorology ) Bouyweather and various other sites, over VHF from Marine Rescue Stations or via phone. Once out of reach of these, about 30 miles off the coast it is down to sat phone or HF radio. Cheers Benn
Garmin has a weather service (Sirius) that gives a radar with realtime weather, tides and marinas around you. Great technology!
__________________
Thanks, Oliver
M/V Oliver
Nordhavn 47 Hull #12
N4712 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2013, 06:45 PM   #31
Guru
 
N4712's Avatar
 
City: South FL
Country: U.S.A
Vessel Name: Oliver
Vessel Model: Nordhavn 47 Hull# 12
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 3,613
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Dilger View Post
Benn I think this is what they are talking about XM
Yep!
__________________
Thanks, Oliver
M/V Oliver
Nordhavn 47 Hull #12
N4712 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2013, 07:04 PM   #32
Guru
 
gwkiwi's Avatar
 
City: Juno Beach, FL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Takes Two
Vessel Model: Defever 49 RPH
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 500
I am trying to understand my SSB Icom MC-710 and its too foreign for me so I will also check out the book.

I know you don't need a license to transmit if its for an emergency call, either yours or anothers emergency but yes a license is needed for general chit chat.

As my EPIRBS are registered do I need to do a separate form for the SSB.
gwkiwi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2013, 08:53 AM   #33
Senior Member
 
Captain K's Avatar
 
City: Gulf Shores, Alabama
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Holly Day
Vessel Model: Marine Trader 44
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 288
Unless they've changed, US Federal Regulations require both a station license and an operator license for SSB transmissions, regardless whether you are a "voluntary" or commercial vessel. (Valid emergency traffic is of course exempted.) The station license will include your SSB, VHF, EPIRB, and RADAR gear if you list those on the appropriate forms. Forms and procedures are available on-line. Not sure of the web address, but if you Google FCC (Federal Communications Commission) the pathway should come up. As has been pointed out previously, these licenses are required for international voyages to signatory countries of the IMO (International Maritime Organization). Fortunately these days the process is simple and easy (no Morse code tests, etc.). Good luck.
Captain K is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2013, 09:08 AM   #34
Scraping Paint
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Vessel Model: CHB 48 Zodiac YL 4.2
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,804
Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain K View Post
... these licenses are required for international voyages to signatory countries of the IMO (International Maritime Organization).
The ITU (International Telecommunications Union) sets operating and licensing standards.

The IMO is concerned only with who must hold a radio license on a ship, and what radios a ship must carry.
RickB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2013, 09:31 AM   #35
Senior Member
 
Captain K's Avatar
 
City: Gulf Shores, Alabama
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Holly Day
Vessel Model: Marine Trader 44
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 288
Quote:
Originally Posted by RickB View Post
The ITU (International Telecommunications Union) sets operating and licensing standards.

The IMO is concerned only with who must hold a radio license on a ship, and what radios a ship must carry.
Thank you for setting me straight amigo!

BTW the website for forms and procedures in the US is www.wireless.fcc.gov/services/index.htm?job=licensing&id=ship_stations
Very simple stuff. No testing. Fill out the appropriate forms, mail them in with a check for the fee, retain the stub at the bottom of the form and you can operate legally with that while your application is being processed. Good luck!
Captain K is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2013, 10:44 AM   #36
Guru
 
BobH's Avatar
 
City: Montgomery, TX
Country: USA
Vessel Model: None, but looking
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 778
>>>Oliver: When you start playing around with your radio, turn off all your onboard electronics which include you refrigeration, battery charger/inverter, florescent lights, etc. They will interferer with your reception.<<<

Just ran across this thread. The above quote is the most ridiculous thing I ever heard. If any of those interfere with reception you have a serious wiring problem. We used our SSB and Pactor modem for three years cruising to receive email and weather reports and the only interference was with the autopilot when transmitting.

Bob
BobH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2013, 11:21 AM   #37
Guru
 
Tony B's Avatar
 
City: Joe Wheeler State Park, Al
Country: Cruising/Live-Aboard USA
Vessel Name: Serenity
Vessel Model: Mainship 36 Dual Cabin -1986
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 1,250
I haven't done any serious cruising in over 10 years. Back then, most cruisers I knew and cruising networks were on the HAM bands. I don't know what it's like now.
__________________
Cruising the Eastern U.S. Inland Waterways and Gulf Coast. Presently on the ICW in Louisiana and heading Back to Texas.
Tony B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2013, 11:37 AM   #38
Guru
 
City: Carefree, Arizona
Country: usa
Vessel Name: sunchaser V
Vessel Model: DeFever 48
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 6,369
For offshore weather forecasting and pulling up GRIB files I'm not sure Sirius/XM is the tool of choice. For near onshore/coastal work the marine VHF broadcasts when combined with Sirius/XM is a pretty good combination. In the far reaches of the PNW Sirius/XM sometimes cannot be received.
sunchaser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2013, 11:41 AM   #39
Guru
 
N4712's Avatar
 
City: South FL
Country: U.S.A
Vessel Name: Oliver
Vessel Model: Nordhavn 47 Hull# 12
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 3,613
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunchaser View Post
For offshore weather forecasting and pulling up GRIB files I'm not sure Sirius/XM is the tool of choice. For near onshore/coastal work the marine VHF broadcasts when combined with Sirius/XM is a pretty good combination. In the far reaches of the PNW Sirius/XM sometimes cannot be received.
We got Sirius everywhere we went last year. Were not in the far north latitudes.
__________________
Thanks, Oliver
M/V Oliver
Nordhavn 47 Hull #12
N4712 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2013, 11:54 AM   #40
TF Site Team
 
Bay Pelican's Avatar
 
City: Chicago, IL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Bay Pelican
Vessel Model: Krogen 42
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,789
Bob. 19 out of 20 boats in the Eastern Caribbean have SSB/Ham radios and generally use them every day. There is a great deal of discussion on how to eliminate interference, and fortunately for me a great deal of expertise available.

You may not start off turning off all electrical appliances on the boat but it is the conventional way of testing for interference if you have interference. On Bay Pelican we had substantial interference from one of the inverters (Freedom 25 now replaced), the galley fluorescent light and a difficult one to figure out, the control panel for my water maker.

Unfortunately for trawlers our antennas are not as high as the mast stays used by the sailboats.

Marty
__________________

Bay Pelican is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:46 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012