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Old 08-21-2014, 08:12 PM   #41
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A couple of observations, nothing more.

1) The Trojan pictures illustrate the heat being moved from the crimp to the plastic to lead interface on the battery. As we know nothing of the test parameters, I am just calling out I noticed this.

2) as far as the hammer type crimper shown, I have found using a drill press vice (as it is light enough to carry aboard) rather than a hammer a sure fire way of assuring a full crimp. Squeeze until you can't squeeze any more.

I have followed Nigel Calder's advice to great satisfaction. I question whether a gas tight crimp could accept any solder into the joint. Heating and stiffening the area adjacent to the crimp makes no sense to me. At least not enough to rework any of my connectors.
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Old 08-21-2014, 08:46 PM   #42
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I hope you all can accept this apology. I'd appreciate that more than asking anyone to take sides.
You have no reason to apologize as you were correct.
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Old 08-21-2014, 08:47 PM   #43
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Greetings,
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Old 08-22-2014, 06:52 AM   #44
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>I question whether a gas tight crimp could accept any solder into the joint. Heating and stiffening the area adjacent to the crimp makes no sense to me<

Dunking a terminal end in a ladel of molten solder does not melt the tinning on the wire beyond the dunk depth.

Wet rag helps as does being quick.
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Old 08-22-2014, 07:50 AM   #45
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>I question whether a gas tight crimp could accept any solder into the joint. Heating and stiffening the area adjacent to the crimp makes no sense to me<

Dunking a terminal end in a ladel of molten solder does not melt the tinning on the wire beyond the dunk depth.

Wet rag helps as does being quick.
If you are too quick you won't solder anything. The wire and the terminal must be brought up to the temperature needed to melt solder and the solder must be allowed to flow into the joint. The molten solder will also wick up the cable and make it stiff.

Cooling a solder joint too quickly with a wet rag may cause a cold solder joint. You have to wait for the materials to cool below the melting point of the solder before trying to cool the joint artificially.

BTW: Where are you getting this ladle of molten solder?
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Old 08-24-2014, 06:39 AM   #46
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>Where are you getting this ladle of molten solder?<

Dad was a plumber and in his day waste pipes were calked with okum then lead was poured to seal the joint.

The skill was taping the lead (special chisels) to tighten the joint even more with out cracking off the cast iron flange.

If done right the line could flex slightly over the years and not leak.

A cast iron pot was part of the gear , with a burner that would spin on to 20 lb propane tank that had threads to accept the unit , the ladle was part of the full kit.

On a larger job a helper would come in 1/2 hour early to get the lead melting.

Today with a small propane torch the old ladle still melts solder , takes a while tho, so its best to do a bunch of terminal ends at once,

Same deal as using a 5 lb roofing copper to solder smaller terminal ends , with out melting up the tinned wire.

>If you are too quick you won't solder anything. The wire and the terminal must be brought up to the temperature needed to melt solder and the solder must be allowed to flow into the joint.

# of course#

The molten solder will also wick up the cable and make it stiff.<

The wet rag stops the heat from going far up the wire , its purpose.

Cooling a solder joint too quickly with a wet rag may cause a cold solder joint. You have to wait for the materials to cool below the melting point of the solder before trying to cool the joint artificially.

The soldered end is NOT cooled with a wet rag , only the wire after it leaves the terminal gets the protection, from before immersion.
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Old 08-27-2014, 12:39 PM   #47
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Neat! Never had heard of solder slugs before, but watched the installation video at the link, and it looks easy enough to do.

Thanks!
I know NAPA shows then in their catalog
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