Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-25-2016, 04:22 PM   #41
Guru
 
fryedaze's Avatar
 
City: Solomons Island Md
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Fryedaze
Vessel Model: MC 42 (Overseas Ltd) Monk 42
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 1,052
Shaft Zincs inside

This is the 2nd time I have seen zincs on a shaft inside a boat. Is it normal? Does it work the same as in the water?
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Zincs BetsyPre-ExhaustWrap.jpg
Views:	29
Size:	187.6 KB
ID:	48349  
__________________
Advertisement

__________________
Dave Frye
Fryedaze, MC 42 (Monk 42') 1989 Overseas Co
http://mvfryedaze.blogspot.com/
fryedaze is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2016, 04:50 PM   #42
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,859
No they don't work except to possibly keep the shaft from pulling out of the boat if it slips the coupler..


If new...not a bad place to store next years...at least you know you got the correct size.
__________________

psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2016, 08:48 AM   #43
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,515
"Is it normal? Does it work the same as in the water?"

They will work great during each sinking.
FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2016, 08:54 AM   #44
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,515
"My "genius" idea on BOB engine was to have a fuel shut off valve. Perfect, except that from the time I closed off the diesel it took 30 minutes to run through the fuel in the line."

A fine idea , (that is required on inspected boats) is a pull cable to shut the fuel tank line at the tank that is external to the boats cabin.

Could help a small fire from becoming a Large fire.

I would disconnect the steering at the rudder (usually just one clevis pin) and make sure youncan easiloy move the rudder by hand.
FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2016, 09:01 AM   #45
Guru
 
fryedaze's Avatar
 
City: Solomons Island Md
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Fryedaze
Vessel Model: MC 42 (Overseas Ltd) Monk 42
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 1,052
Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
No they don't work except to possibly keep the shaft from pulling out of the boat if it slips the coupler..
The other one I have seen did just that. The coupling bolts sheared and the zinc stopped the prop from hitting the rudder. It was a good thing since the boat sheared the coupling just as it entered lock 52 on the OHIO. If the rudders had fouled he would have had a tuff time getting to the wall. To compound the problem, the lock master was loading the boat from back to front. Each subsequent boat had to pass the others in the lock. Pretty dumb, never saw that in over 100 lockings.
__________________
Dave Frye
Fryedaze, MC 42 (Monk 42') 1989 Overseas Co
http://mvfryedaze.blogspot.com/
fryedaze is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2016, 09:58 AM   #46
Senior Member
 
tallswede's Avatar
 
City: Baytown, Texas
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Islander
Vessel Model: Prairie 36
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 245
I know autopilots are a bit off topic here but Janice, I can tell you whether you have a keel or not, any boat will go off track in a seaway. Wind and waves will just move the boat around. Just a bit of weight shift in a 23' boat will change the way water is flowing over the hull and send it in another direction. Even my 36' Prairie which has a pretty good keel shape will only hold a course for a few seconds out on the bay. A good auto pilot is a blessing. I have a tillerpilot on my 23' Hunter sailboat and it's the best thing since sliced bread. These are the most economical autopilots I know of and if there is a way to rig one on your boat it would really be nice. They can even be had with remotes so if you are away from the tiller such as grabbing a drink or making a sandwich, you can change course when needed.

Kevin
tallswede is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2016, 11:28 AM   #47
Guru
 
janice142's Avatar
 
City: St. Pete, FL
Country: USofA
Vessel Name: Seaweed
Vessel Model: Schucker mini-trawler
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 914
Send a message via AIM to janice142 Send a message via MSN to janice142 Send a message via Yahoo to janice142 Send a message via Skype™ to janice142
Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
If new...not a bad place to store next years...at least you know you got the correct size.
That's true. I never have to worry about finding my shaft zincs. The pancakes for the struts are another matter. The main purpose though is as you say: to prevent the shaft from making an untimely exit of the boat.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tallswede View Post
I know autopilots are a bit off topic here but Janice, I can tell you whether you have a keel or not, any boat will go off track in a seaway. Wind and waves will just move the boat around. Just a bit of weight shift in a 23' boat will change the way water is flowing over the hull and send it in another direction. Even my 36' Prairie which has a pretty good keel shape will only hold a course for a few seconds out on the bay. A good auto pilot is a blessing. I have a tillerpilot on my 23' Hunter sailboat and it's the best thing since sliced bread. These are the most economical autopilots I know of and if there is a way to rig one on your boat it would really be nice. They can even be had with remotes so if you are away from the tiller such as grabbing a drink or making a sandwich, you can change course when needed.

Kevin
Thank you Kevin. I was obviously spoilt with our 40'er. She stayed on track with just the barest of nudges when, as you say, wind came up or currents came into play. You see, when Daddy came up to the fly bridge he wanted to see a straight track. Otherwise I was wasting fuel and that was a Sin.

And too he could check on me from down below by just looking aft.

It's not a bad thing to steer. And now that I know the drill, i.e. put her in neutral so she'll drift, I'm more satisfied. Perhaps I've been led astray by a neighbor who swears his autopilot is the best thing since sliced bread.

I definitely need to watch my One-More-Thing-itis.
Goodness knows I've got the best little boat on the planet. No, I'm not prejudiced either. You should see her! Except for the stuff that's wrong, needs fixing, upgrading, painting or repairs, she's perfect.

I am truly blessed aboard my Seaweed. I wish everyone could be as happy as I am. It's a wonderful life.

Maybe one of the wonderful moderators will split off this part of the tread and call it Tracking Difficulties. Surely I'm not the only one on the planet whose boat won't go in a straight line.

That's interesting about the tiller pilot. For the near-term I'm going to enjoy Seaweed. An autopilot is on the list, but it's not necessary. I've enjoyed my home for nearly eight years now without, and can certainly continue to do so.

Gosh, there have been so many improvements to her over the years. Truly, she is the boat I imagined all those years ago. I am fortunate.
__________________

__________________
Janice aboard Seaweed, living the good life afloat...
http://janice142.com
janice142 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
solar panels Scabbydan Electrical and Electronics & Navigation 16 09-25-2012 09:00 AM
Cell Phone Solar Charger marinetrader Electrical and Electronics & Navigation 5 11-07-2011 10:03 PM
Solar Panel marinetrader Electrical and Electronics & Navigation 102 08-22-2011 08:25 PM
Cheaper Solar? FF Electrical and Electronics & Navigation 2 03-16-2011 05:04 AM




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:14 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012