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Old 08-17-2012, 12:55 PM   #61
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Around here, someone beaches a boat at high tide and forgets to move it as the tide goes out.

Personally, I wouldn't beach my boat except to save it from sinking, but other people do it all the time.


I only beach a boat if the boat can sit on it's bottom without tipping or damaging the running gear.
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Old 08-17-2012, 01:26 PM   #62
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In my marina, the berths are covered and it is hard to see traffic so the marina staff have asked everyone to toot their horn as when leaving the slip and entering and exiting the fairways. Most everyone does honk.

When we came in Sunday, our honk alerted some folks to get their dog out of the water. We had to stop our boat and wait for them to get him--ultimately a young boy jumped in after the dog and got him out of the main fairway.

One marina on the sacremento has a restaurant at the entrance and the bartender honks a very loud horn whenever anyone enters or exits that marina. the berthers there must love that.
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Old 08-17-2012, 02:59 PM   #63
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A mixture caused this debacle. It was a mixture of an auto pilot with a party. They hit the beach at about 18 knots. I knew the boat, and I took the picture.
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Old 08-17-2012, 04:49 PM   #64
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Did it happen at night?
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Old 08-17-2012, 06:45 PM   #65
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It's the not at all part I worry about. On a trip from Newport to Bermuda, I saw some lights on the horizon that were on constant bearing with us. I woke our captain who tried to raise the vessel, which was clearly on a crossing/collision course. Eventually, it appeared he would cross well ahead of us. After an hour or so, a very drunk "captain" got on the radio and told us that he was, indeed, a tow vessel (lights not properly displayed) and that he had a huge barge on 100 meters or so of cable behind him with no lights on it (did I mention it was starless and pitch black?). We roused the crew and tacked off for several miles. The tow vessel finally put a searchlight on the barge, which looked particularly lethal, as close as we were on a blustery night in the Atlantic). I do think this is the exception, rather than the rule, for commercial skippers, but things like this have happened to me more than once and the consequences of them getting it wrong can be pretty disastrous.
It's a crazy world...on one hand the rules really aren't much for the small rec boater...yet they are the only rules we have and the authorities make a big desl about us following them if an accident happens yet the boating licensing issue and enforcement of existing rules is almost non-existent.
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Old 08-17-2012, 07:16 PM   #66
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It's a world in which a person who has never operated a boat in his life can plunk down the money for a 60 foot diesel cruiser and drive away from the dock with no more training than the handwriting skills required to sign the check. So the notion that boaters should be all up to date on the horn regulations and practice them seems a little ludicrous, don't you think?

Particularly in an age of electronic communications. Knowing horn signals seems somewhat tantamount to knowing how to bank a fire properly on a steam locomotive. Interesting but not very useful anymore. Like I said, nobody uses horns around here, recreational or commercial, and it doesn't seem to make one whit of difference.

Having a VHF radio and knowing what and who uses each channel, now that's important I think.
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Old 08-17-2012, 07:36 PM   #67
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It's a world in which a person who has never operated a boat in his life can plunk down the money for a 60 foot diesel cruiser and drive away from the dock with no more training than the handwriting skills required to sign the check. So the notion that boaters should be all up to date on the horn regulations and practice them seems a little ludicrous, don't you think?

Particularly in an age of electronic communications. Knowing horn signals seems somewhat tantamount to knowing how to bank a fire properly on a steam locomotive. Interesting but not very useful anymore. Like I said, nobody uses horns around here, recreational or commercial, and it doesn't seem to make one whit of difference.

Having a VHF radio and knowing what and who uses each channel, now that's important I think.
he/she can't drive that 60 footer in New Jersy unless they can show some proof of boater education....and if you live in NJ...you hve to take an 8 hr course and pass what has become a not so easy exam. The course material is still way out there..but at lest it is something.
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Old 08-17-2012, 07:45 PM   #68
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............... Knowing horn signals seems somewhat tantamount to knowing how to bank a fire properly on a steam locomotive. Interesting but not very useful anymore................
The requirement to carry three cheap, but less than three year old flares isn't far behind.

I believe they just recently changed the regulations to allow an electronic simulation of a bell rather than requiring an actual metal bell with a certain diameter.
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Old 08-17-2012, 07:54 PM   #69
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he/she can't drive that 60 footer in New Jersy unless they can show some proof of boater education....and if you live in NJ...you hve to take an 8 hr course and pass what has become a not so easy exam. The course material is still way out there..but at lest it is something.
Yes, but I assume it's the same course and exam that's given to the fellow who just bought a 15-foot Bayliner runabout. There is no quickie boater course on the planet that's going to teach the fellow who just bought the 60 footer squat-all about how to maneuver or navigate or dock or whatever his big, heavy, multi-engine boat.
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Old 08-17-2012, 08:12 PM   #70
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Yes, but I assume it's the same course and exam that's given to the fellow who just bought a 15-foot Bayliner runabout. There is no quickie boater course on the planet that's going to teach the fellow who just bought the 60 footer squat-all about how to maneuver or navigate or dock or whatever his big, heavy, multi-engine boat.
Yes to the same course...heck its the same for the Jet Ski people...but no it's a classroom affair...no hands on...but after years of hands on training...some guys can drive that 60 footer after just a couple of lessons...and some guys who have been boating their whole life still can't drive their 16 RHIB let alone their 40-60 footers.

No matter what you do in life...like Dirty Harry said so well..."A man's gotta know his limitations"...

I saw it as an instructor pilot all the time...some people could do anything with the aircraft, some people could do nothing, some could fly but made bad decisions, some were brilliant but had no stick and rudder controls, some could be Blue Angels yet should never have been let into the operational environment.

same with boats...some of the posters on here scare me to death!
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Old 08-17-2012, 08:17 PM   #71
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...some of the posters on here scare me to death!

Don't you do towing? If so, then aren't we all potential future customers?
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Old 08-17-2012, 08:20 PM   #72
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The requirement to carry three cheap, but less than three year old flares isn't far behind.

I believe they just recently changed the regulations to allow an electronic simulation of a bell rather than requiring an actual metal bell with a certain diameter.
From the USCG Navcen On Line rules...

The bell or gong or both may be replaced by other equipment having the same respective sound characteristics, provided that manual sounding of the prescribed signals shall always be possible.

Please note that the bell is no longer required on a vessel 12 meters or more but less than 20 meters in length].

i) A vessel of 12 meters or more but less than 20 meters in length shall not be obliged to give the bell signals prescribed in paragraphs (g) and (h) of this Rule. However, if she does not, she shall make some other efficient sound signal at intervals of not more than 2 minutes.
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Old 08-17-2012, 08:21 PM   #73
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Don't you do towing? If so, then aren't we all potential future customers?
Yes and no.....

The posters that scare me are because of their mindset....
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Old 08-17-2012, 08:30 PM   #74
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No matter what you do in life...like Dirty Harry said so well..."A man's gotta know his limitations"...
Absolutley. And my example was just to reinforce your "it's a crazy world" statement. One would like to think--- and would probably be correct almost all of the time--- that a person buying a new 60 foot boat would either have garnered a lot of boating experience along the way or if not, was smart enough to hire a crew.

Perhaps a better example would be the Joe Sixpacks who plunk down the money for 21 foot runabout or sportfish and then roar off into the sunset without a care in the world believing that, "Hey, driving a boat's just like driving a car, right?" These are the guys who, until the last mill on Lake Washington finally closed, seemed to regularly slam into the log booms along the shore at night at full speed and kill people, either themselves or their passengers.
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Old 08-17-2012, 08:38 PM   #75
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Absolutley. And my example was just to reinforce your "it's a crazy world" statement. One would like to think--- and would probably be correct almost all of the time--- that a person buying a new 60 foot boat would either have garnered a lot of boating experience along the way or if not, was smart enough to hire a crew.

Perhaps a better example would be the Joe Sixpacks who plunk down the money for 21 foot runabout or sportfish and then roar off into the sunset without a care in the world believing that, "Hey, driving a boat's just like driving a car, right?" These are the guys who, until the last mill on Lake Washington finally closed, seemed to regularly slam into the log booms along the shore at night at full speed and kill people, either themselves or their passengers.
My experience....whether the guy buys a 60 footer or a 18 footer...it's all about personality....whether its 60 or 10 feet the A-hole is gonna hurt people or equipment no matter what....the good operator could buy a used nuclear aircraft carrier and be a great boater.

As I pointed out with the pilot issues...some people are operators and the rest "whatevers"....the people who love boating but are anything but operators should go slowly and surely and boat with friends that are....
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Old 08-17-2012, 09:10 PM   #76
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A year or two ago I was heading north on a narrow portion of the AICW and another trawler was heading south, both of us at a breakneck 7 knots or so. We had room to pass each other, port to port safely, but not much more.

At exactly the point where we were side by side, a boater in a 20' or so CC who appeared to be a professional crabber passed me between the two of us.

Now, I suspect he had far more hours on the water than either of us, and should have known better, but he lacked the good sense to wait until passing was safe.

Mind you, I don't really care what stupid things others do until they endanger me or my family (or boat).

If you've ever been to driving school, a big deal is made of "defensive driving". It's something we should carry over to our boating.
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Old 08-17-2012, 09:20 PM   #77
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....a big deal is made of "defensive driving". It's something we should carry over to our boating.
Good point. We do, particularly in meeting situations. Even if we are the stand-on vessel we always give way to commercial vessels and we do it early and obviously enough so that they understand our intentions to go behind them or their tow if they have one.

Same thing with meeting situations with other recreational boats. We've seen and heard about enough near misses to not take anything for granted anymore so we always assume a give-way vessel won't. If they do, great, but we're more than prepared to let them blunder blindly along on the course they are so intent on following. It's no big deal to vary our course a bit.

And we always pass a sailboat under sail on their downwind side. One, it doesn't affect their wind and two, a sailboat-- particulary a larger one--- is much more likely to tack suddenly than it is to jibe.
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Old 08-17-2012, 09:41 PM   #78
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Marin posted
"Good point. We do, particularly in meeting situations. Even if we are the stand-on vessel we always give way to commercial vessels and we do it early and obviously enough so that they understand our intentions to go behind them or their tow if they have one."
Very important, especially making your intentions obvious early on
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Old 08-17-2012, 09:42 PM   #79
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After all my time on the water...I just can't equate driving a boat like driving a car...especially going 6-8 knots....it's like walking...even riding a bike seems more harrowing.

At 6-8 knots...things are happening so slow...and most of our boats are responsive enough to do almost anything except react to something so completely sudden or unexpected (meaning I would have to be waking up at the helm).....I just can't get too excited..maybe after towing for over a decade in close quarters has jaded me too far.

The trick is to avoid most of these situations from a long way out as Marin suggested...that is really the main intent of the Colregs anyhow...to never really get into a close quarters situation.
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Old 08-17-2012, 10:42 PM   #80
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Did it happen at night?
Nope, late afternoon. They had it on auto pilot set for the inlet running back from fishing. It landed a little east of the inlet. Good thing it did. It missed the jetty rocks. Sometimes depending on automatic equipment is not so good. I know of a charter skipper who would leave for the fishing grounds in the middle of the night. He would set his auto pilot, chart plotter arrival alarm, and radar contact alarm. Then he would go to sleep. Now, that is depending on your equipment too damn much. Failure to keep proper lookout. That's why we need to stay on our toes out there.
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