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Old 12-31-2013, 04:13 PM   #61
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There is no legal requirement for tinned conductors in the US (CFR's), Canada (TP1332E), Europe (CE, RCD's) or any of the voluntary standards (ABYC, SAE, NFPA, UL, CSA, IEEE etc.) Although I personally believe it is a good idea, particularily in salt water.
Yeah, I find that dumb. Copper will corrode like a mother and then create resistance which could cause a fire. Dumb.
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Old 12-31-2013, 04:19 PM   #62
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Yeah, I find that dumb. Stair copper will corrode like a mother and then create resistance which could cause a fire. Dumb.
But it really doesn't corrode all that fast in protected and properly done wiring...many marine electronics manufactures and other component manufactures don't always used tinned wire...so running it to the device that doesn't have it seems a little silly too sometimes.
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Old 12-31-2013, 04:47 PM   #63
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If the OP were to run an extension cord through a door or window, plug the male end into a dock receptacle and plug the charger into the female end of the extension cord, he would be fine.

Once he decides to put a permanent power inlet on the boat and hard wire either the charger or a receptacle, he has in effect installed a shore power system on the boat
Ya but, ya but - as mentioned above, the charger is not be "hard wired", unless that term encompasses what I plan to do, namely position the appliance's plug into a fixed position at a small round "window" formerly occupied by an ancient shore power inlet. The inlet I pictured earlier in this thread is NOT the item I have bought - the one I have is simply a plastic tube or cylinder (with a flange for attaching it to the hole in the deck) into which the plug is placed.
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Old 01-01-2014, 07:25 AM   #64
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many marine electronics manufactures and other component manufactures don't always used tinned wire..

Seems even the cheap Euro hardware , an Chinese knock off folks will at least tin the end of the wire.

This is so it can be captured under a screw with out crushing.

Guess they dont expect marine terminal ends to ever be installed.
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Old 01-01-2014, 07:53 AM   #65
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For those interested in real world wiring standards:

http://www.leoni.com/uploads/tx_down...sealine_02.pdf

European electrical designers have been far ahead of us for years. They have all but universally moved to DIN rail components and use ferrules on wire ends to get away from the problems that go along with trying to capture a wire or wires (tinned or not) under a screw.

The solder dipped wire ends you see on some equipment are intended for the US market where all manner of cheap and less reliable termination methods are the norm. Dipping the wire ends at least gives a chance of obtaining a secure connection without stray ends shorting out with their neighbors on an open connector block or stabbing the installer.

I manufacture a marine exhaust treatment device controller and use nothing but DIN rail devices with ferrules on every wire from millivolt level signal wiring to 400V power. The only ring terminal used is to connect a safety ground to the cabinet.
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Old 01-01-2014, 08:23 AM   #66
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I replaced the shore power inlet on my boat and the (Marinco) instructions stated specifically not to tin or solder the bare wire ends before clamping them in place. Someone in the past had tinned the ends of the wires so I cut them back and installed the inlet as per the instructions.

Those connectors would be nice but converting an entire boat would be incredibly expensive and for little gain. Ring terminals do work if done properly.
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Old 01-01-2014, 08:52 AM   #67
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I don't think anyone would suggest converting the entire boat.

I suggest any new installations or major alterations would benefit by upgrading to the best available technology. On my own boat and a couple others that I "manage" for absentee owners, I upgrade where it is appropriate (such as when the connection was done badly the last time).
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