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Old 10-04-2013, 05:07 PM   #21
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One feature that I don't think has been stressed is the ability to overlay the radar image on the chart. This came in very handy for us in the Bahamas since the charts are not totally accurate. Using the radar overlay we were able to offset the various cays to match the radar image thereby making the chartplotter much more accurate. It seemed that the offset was slightly different for different areas.

Bob
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Old 10-07-2013, 12:58 PM   #22
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I have had a 16 mile dome Furuno, great for collision avoidance and close navigation, and have 64 mile open array Furuno which is also great for collision avoidance and slightly better for distant navigation. The 64 is a lot more sensitive, picking up birds etc and distant thunder storms.

Given where chart plotters are today I feel a radar for collision avoidance is itís predominate roll and like others have said with AIS you have a great complement of electronics. I donít think you could go wrong with either unit.
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Old 10-07-2013, 04:46 PM   #23
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Marlinmike:

What action do you take when you see a boat out at 64 miles that is on a collision course with you ;-).

Seriously, I have used 2 Kw/24 mi units and 4 kw/48 mi units. Offshore at night I set them on 6 NM range and occasionally go out to 12 NM and look around for traffic.

A 12 mile range works pretty good for painting thunderstorms during the day. That range gives plenty of time to reef down and prepare for the blow that may come.

The 4KW units have a 24" scanner diameter so they give slightly better resolution. With the new HD units you can get the same resolution in a 2KW/24 mi unit.

Near shore or entering a harbor I go down to about 1-1/2 to 3 mile range. Either the 2KW or the 4KW can pick up ocean buoys at that range. If I want to discriminate between the red and the green buoy at right angles to the channel, I just wait to get a little closer and range down.

For recreational use the 2KW HD units are the best bargain.
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Old 10-07-2013, 05:21 PM   #24
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Something that the majority of posts here have missed regarding range is that higher range radars very often come with higher power transmitters.

A higher power transmitter will produce more reflected energy, making small target detection better at even close range.

The narrower beam of most long range units further helps small target detection.

So, while looking at something 64 miles away isnt all that realistic, the 64 mile radar will generally see smaller targets like little fiberglass fishing boats much better than lower distance units
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Old 10-08-2013, 08:26 AM   #25
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"Marlinmike:

What action do you take when you see a boat out at 64 miles that is on a collision course with you ;-)."

Actually never on 64 mile range, as I'm sure you know that number is more a lab number. But I did get a unit sized based on my offshore fishing and I wanted 6kw power with a narrow HBW angle, I won't go into all the uses of a high powered radar here, just suffice it to say it's useful 100 miles offshore.

Interesting side note, when I first got the 64 mile unit I actually didn't like it compared to my 16 as it was too sensitive, with time you learn to adjust and adapt.
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Old 10-08-2013, 08:52 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ksanders View Post
Something that the majority of posts here have missed regarding range is that higher range radars very often come with higher power transmitters.
<<But just to reiterate....the narrower the beam width, the better. And usually the more powerful the radar, the narrower the beam width. In this case, the longer range radar likely has more power and a narrower beam width.>>

...said Baker...
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Old 10-08-2013, 10:28 AM   #27
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Radar install on a 1982 mainship 34

I am working on installing 3g radar on a 1982 mainship 34. the mast is located on fht for deck. Has anyone found a way to pull wires from the bottom of the mount to the inside helm.

Thanks Walter
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