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Old 05-26-2017, 09:23 PM   #1
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Paper charts in jeopardy?

I'm an old, old time navigator and find the information difference between raster and vector charts appalling. Apparently NOAA is working toward abandoning paper charts altogether. See article:
Paper charts in jeopardy? - Ocean Navigator - Web Exclusives 2017
There is an opportunity to send in a comment.

I use electronic nav, but go places and thru narrows most people don't. I find the additional information of land detail (on paper charts, raster) very helpful.
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Old 05-26-2017, 09:49 PM   #2
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Just out of curiosity, whats appalling about vector charts? You can layer on as much information as you need and they are more accurate than Raster charts. I use both
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Old 05-26-2017, 10:44 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lepke View Post
I'm an old, old time navigator and find the information difference between raster and vector charts appalling. Apparently NOAA is working toward abandoning paper charts altogether. See article:
Paper charts in jeopardy? - Ocean Navigator - Web Exclusives 2017
There is an opportunity to send in a comment.

I use electronic nav, but go places and thru narrows most people don't. I find the additional information of land detail (on paper charts, raster) very helpful.
I fully agree with your frustrations as to the status of NOAA charts and availability. In recognition of that I have retained and acquired charts of the flat world I explore. These with the Out of date [Edition #8 1960] Pacific Coast Alaska Coast Pilot, my GPS, fathometer, and radar I feel comfortable with facing the world without 'Current best NOAA' charts.
These old charts have world charm even with obsolete degree deflections from date of print. They feel good, look good rolled up in the overhead.
I am fond of my charts.

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Old 05-26-2017, 11:51 PM   #4
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Originally Posted by Lepke View Post

I use electronic nav, but go places and thru narrows most people don't. I find the additional information of land detail (on paper charts, raster) very helpful.
Raster charts are available electronically as well.
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Old 05-27-2017, 03:13 AM   #5
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As I see it ECDIS is not all it claims to be. I work on a US Navy vessel and we still use paper alongside of the electronic charts. It is impossible to put a range or bearing fix on an electronic chart picture. We still do 6 minute range and bearing fixes when entering or leaving harbor or in close quarters to land.
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Old 05-27-2017, 05:31 AM   #6
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As I see it ECDIS is not all it claims to be. I work on a US Navy vessel and we still use paper alongside of the electronic charts. It is impossible to put a range or bearing fix on an electronic chart picture. We still do 6 minute range and bearing fixes when entering or leaving harbor or in close quarters to land.
But the surface fleet is still a century behind. We are now in the world of electronics.

Aircraft land on those ships with one or two guys. Why does it take an entire bridge crew to just get into the harbor?

And please, I have done both...flew aboard them and been part of a bridge crew.

If they are still taking bearings and putting them on paper in the next 20 years....I will still chuckle to myself.
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Old 05-27-2017, 05:49 AM   #7
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When we found out that the world was not flat and needed to go somewhere, old school navigation, even regional trips used dead reckoning. I learned that way and its served me well. SWMBO says to others that she thinks my limited brain functions is centered around a compass rose, no matter where we go, land included. The old expression of "turned around" comes to mind and in part probably originated from some of the old timey sea dogs attempting to go somewhere on land.



As it pertains to paper charts, call me old fashioned with a bit of common sense still behind my navigational needs and desires. I cannot plan a trip in advance using any electronic gear. But when the rubber meets the road and I am in unfamiliar regions and your electronic gear quits, I have a paper chart to back me up. And this seems to always happen if you boat long enough, IMO. And yes I still prescribe to dead reckoning navigation, always keeping track of my running time and compass direction on a log folder.

I just hope that I can continue to boat long enough to use and access available paper charts. And I surely do not look down on folks that also subscribe to old school thinking of the tried and true methods while on the water. As it says on many publications, never depend on just one method of navigation.
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Old 05-27-2017, 06:17 AM   #8
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Why do people think that a raster chart on a computer is any different than on a table?

The only difference I see is that it is
1. harder to find the "notes" in the margins of the chart....so I use my electronic coast pilot instead.

2. A little easier to see more chart as it is a larger format, but in no greater detail.

The advantage of the electronic chart is that it is up to date the day I need it, freshly downloaded... obviously in a place like the US where free charts are available. All bets off on paper versus electronic charts where accessibility is more difficult or expensive.

Not sure why one would think those that use electronic charts mostly are looking down at anyone....just frustrated some think a picture of the paper chart on a computer screen is somehow different.

One last thought...if old methods are so tried and true, why are there so many reef wrecks even on my paper charts?
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Old 05-27-2017, 06:26 AM   #9
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Why do people think that a raster chart on a computer is any different than on a table?

The only difference I see is that it is
1. harder to find the "notes" in the margins of the chart....so I use my electronic coast pilot instead.

2. A little easier to see more chart as it is a larger format, but in no greater detail.

The advantage of the electronic chart is that it is up to date the day I need it, freshly downloaded... obviously in a place like the US where free charts are available. All bets off on paper versus electronic charts where accessibility is more difficult or expensive.

Not sure why one would think those that use electronic charts mostly are looking down at anyone....just frustrated some think a picture of the paper chart on a computer screen is somehow different.

One last thought...if old methods are so tried and true, why are there so many reef wrecks even on my paper charts?
This is a non-secular train of thought. There are parts of the state of the art airplanes laying on the bottom of the ocean these days as a result of pilots depending on electronic equipment that failed. Heck frozen water has taken down a couple too. One even crashed into a runway a few year too, depending on electronic equipment and a pilot that could not fly the airplane by "wire".
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Old 05-27-2017, 06:44 AM   #10
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Not really, you and everyone else....especially those that have made a living on the sea or air knows electronic navigation, in the right hands with backups has made going to sea a lot safer and less stressful.

Doesn't mean sloppy or inattentivev work ethic can develope, for those even paper won't save them.
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Old 05-27-2017, 08:19 AM   #11
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GEES............ I use electronic stuff to confirm where I think I am at and that is it. I do all my navigation using paper charts. My chart plotter is to big to use it on my 4" X 6" Garmin or my 9.7" IPad Pro
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Old 05-27-2017, 08:30 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Jackson View Post
As I see it ECDIS is not all it claims to be. I work on a US Navy vessel and we still use paper alongside of the electronic charts. It is impossible to put a range or bearing fix on an electronic chart picture. We still do 6 minute range and bearing fixes when entering or leaving harbor or in close quarters to land.


I like my paper charts as well. I have individual charts as well as chart books. I also had a whole bunch of charts printed by an outfit in Bham. They are only B&W but they were relatively inexpensive.

I am NOT good at taking range and bearing fixes and keeping them recorded on a paper chart. However, it is a practice that I am improving upon in my home waters. I think it is valuable in case of an equipment failure.

Yes, I can already hear many of you gearing up to write that you have protected yourself against equipment failure by way of multiple duplication of devices and equipment. I know that is possible, in many cases desirable, and I actually have electronic backups to my gps. However, I like to be able to continue to think, problem solve, and calculate rather than just look at an icon on a screen.
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Old 05-27-2017, 09:21 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by Scratchnsaw View Post

As it pertains to paper charts, call me old fashioned with a bit of common sense still behind my navigational needs and desires. I cannot plan a trip in advance using any electronic gear. But when the rubber meets the road and I am in unfamiliar regions and your electronic gear quits, I have a paper chart to back me up. And this seems to always happen if you boat long enough, IMO. And yes I still prescribe to dead reckoning navigation, always keeping track of my running time and compass direction on a log folder.

.
I won't look down on you but I will call you old fashioned. You do what you are comfortable with, but that doesn't make it better, just works better for you. I can plan electronically, and I can be prepared with backup electronics that are independent of the other systems. I keep track of all you do except do it electronically. My charts are more up to date than yours. If I want paper, I can always print it out, but I just don't have the need. The difference and the reason I think old fashioned is an appropriate term, but not an insult, is how you and I first learned. I started with electronics. Now, don't say I can't do the other, because I can. I just don't need to use paper and don't choose to.

I also don't hand write documents, I use electronic means and type them. I don't fill out forms by hand, I scan them and use a form filler. I don't read hard copies of fiction, but have them in electronic form.

You feel more comfortable having paper charts, because you've always had them and never chosen to wean yourself. I don't feel the need for them because I've always had electronics and always been comfortable with it.
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Old 05-27-2017, 09:56 AM   #14
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So, unless NOAA is discontinuing updating the electronic data (which I doubt!!), then it should still be possible to get paper versions of the "electronic" charts, just not printed by NOAA. Just like Amazon. A friend recently self-published a book. Ordered today, printed today, shipped today, receive paper book tomorrow!!
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Old 05-27-2017, 09:57 AM   #15
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So, unless NOAA is discontinuing updating the electronic data (which I doubt!!), then it should still be possible to get paper versions of the "electronic" charts, just not printed by NOAA. Just like Amazon. A friend recently self-published a book. Ordered today, printed today, shipped today, receive paper book tomorrow!!
Or just print them yourself. If for any reason we want a paper version of a chart, we just print it.
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Old 05-27-2017, 10:24 AM   #16
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You must have a BIG printer!!!
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Old 05-27-2017, 10:29 AM   #17
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You must have a BIG printer!!!
Yes.
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Old 05-27-2017, 11:04 AM   #18
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You can layer on as much information as you need and they are more accurate than Raster charts.


???

I've seen some vector charts that have info that's not on the comparable raster charts -- marina info in the C-Map charts, for instance -- but haven't before heard an argument that says the comparable data in vector is more accurate than raster...

???

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Old 05-27-2017, 12:05 PM   #19
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The whole appeal of vector charts is that you can layer on as much info or as little as you want with a click of a mouse. Vector charts are also more accurate than raster scan.
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Old 05-27-2017, 12:13 PM   #20
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What is the difference between a raster chart and a vector chart?
Many CHS charts are available in digital form as either a Raster Navigational Chart (RNC) in the BSB format or as an Electronic Navigational Chart (ENC) in the S-57 vector format. Both kinds of electronic charts, when used with navigation software, relieve the navigator of many of the traditional paper chart routines, and contribute to safer navigation.

RNCs are simply an electronic image of the paper charts and as such provide no more information than that available on the paper chart. Raster charts are digitized by scanning the paper chart. Each tiny segment of each line on a chart is converted to a raster picture element or pixel. Similar to a television picture, when magnified they appear as dots on a grid. Beyond geo-referencing, there is no intelligence inherent in the raster image. Many recreational boaters have adopted raster electronic chart systems because the charts are less expensive and the navigation software required to use these charts has been tailored to meet the needs of the recreational boater.

ENCs are vector charts or "smart charts" and are coded with additional information not available in paper or raster charts. ENCs carry a wealth of geo-spatial intelligence through a database of information associated with them. On an ENC the user can click on different features, such as a light or buoy, and retrieve additional information about the feature. For example, a wharf appears only as an image on an RNC, but an ENC can identify it as a wharf and attach attributes to the wharf, such as height, length, age, ownership, number of berths – data that might otherwise be available only by consulting the relevant printed Sailing Directions.

ENCs also provide users with more control over the display of the chart, including the ability to turn different layers of information on and off. Because ENCs offer more powerful navigational flexibility and tools, they are typically used by commercial ships. When displayed on an Electronic Chart Display and Information System (ECDIS) and integrated with other data, such as GPS position, radar, planned route, heading, speed and draught, ENCs become part of a powerful system that allows mariners to know their ship’s position instantly and accurately and to be warned of dangerous situations.


From Fisheries Canada.
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