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Old 06-10-2012, 04:36 PM   #21
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Mast

Here is a photo of our boat inside the boathouse with the mast folded down to its horizontal resting position. It has two one inch stainless rod supports aft that sit in base plates with one bolt and nut attached when raised for support. There are photos on our website at www.rochepoint.ca with the mast up.
The mast is about a 40lb lift from the height of your waist, becoming a lot less as it rises. Made of aluminium with epoxy paint. Works great, just wish the house opening was a foot taller and it could stay up
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Old 06-10-2012, 05:01 PM   #22
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Here is a photo of our boat inside the boathouse with the mast folded down to its horizontal resting position.....Made of aluminium with epoxy paint...
It looks great! What prep did you do for the mast, what epoxy paint did you use and how did did you apply it? We're getting ready to paint our mast and boom.
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Old 06-10-2012, 05:12 PM   #23
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Sorry, the previous owner had it made in Vancouver to replace the wooden one.
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Old 06-10-2012, 07:19 PM   #24
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Here at Topsail beach we have a swing bridge with only about 13ft clear on mid tide, there are a few local boats that have the Hinged mount. it looked like a 3 1/2 inch pipe cut in half about 3 feet tall and a base plate with a 3 inch aluminum pole as the mounting pole. has a Pin they pull the pin lean the radar back or forward depending on the boat to a rest drive under the few low bridges we have around here.
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Old 06-11-2012, 12:52 PM   #25
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The transmission emmisions from the typical radar used on recreational boats won't hurt you unless you hold your head hard against the side of the radome with the antenna transmitting and hold it there for a solid week. I've heard this not only from the very experienced marine electronics dealer we use but also the folks I've talked to about radar at my employer (Boeing).

That said, better safe than sorry. While we never run the boat from the flying bridge (nothing to do with the position of the radar) we don't let guests go up on the flying bridge while the radar is transmitting, or if they want to go up and we don't need the radar, we turn it off. But while I don't recommend a flying-bridge face mount for a radar antenna for several reasons, emissions isn't one of them.

Flying-bridge face mounts are pretty common on older boats like ours because they have solid wood masts and the antenna cables for the older generation radar sets were pretty thick. So they could not easily be run down inside the mast. The flying bridge mount makes connecting the antenna to the display unit very easy.

But the position of a radome on the flying bridge face is actually quite aways above the heads of people in the main cabin. In fact it's higher over the heads of the people in the main cabin than the antenna on the typical radar arch is over the heads of people on a flying bridge on boats the size of ours. The only way to get in the beam of our antenna is for a tall person to stand upright on the end of our bow pulpit and even then I'm not sure he'd be in the beam.

A flying bridge face mount has two advantages but they do not outweigh the one main disadvantage. So I don't recommend them for a new installation if another option exists, which is almost always the case.

In additon to the typical mast mount, I've seen radomes mounted on poles of various lengths--- stainless, aluminum, fiberglass, PVC, and even wood--- attached to the flying bridge deck. An arrangment like this could easily be made foldable for a boathouse.
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Old 06-11-2012, 03:04 PM   #26
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The transmission emmisions from the typical radar used on recreational boats won't hurt you unless you hold your head hard against the side of the radome with the antenna transmitting and hold it there for a solid week. I've heard this not only from the very experienced marine electronics dealer we use but also the folks I've talked to about radar at my employer (Boeing).

That said, better safe than sorry. While we never run the boat from the flying bridge (nothing to do with the position of the radar) we don't let guests go up on the flying bridge while the radar is transmitting, or if they want to go up and we don't need the radar, we turn it off. But while I don't recommend a flying-bridge face mount for a radar antenna for several reasons, emissions isn't one of them.

Flying-bridge face mounts are pretty common on older boats like ours because they have solid wood masts and the antenna cables for the older generation radar sets were pretty thick. So they could not easily be run down inside the mast. The flying bridge mount makes connecting the antenna to the display unit very easy.

But the position of a radome on the flying bridge face is actually quite aways above the heads of people in the main cabin. In fact it's higher over the heads of the people in the main cabin than the antenna on the typical radar arch is over the heads of people on a flying bridge on boats the size of ours. The only way to get in the beam of our antenna is for a tall person to stand upright on the end of our bow pulpit and even then I'm not sure he'd be in the beam.

A flying bridge face mount has two advantages but they do not outweigh the one main disadvantage. So I don't recommend them for a new installation if another option exists, which is almost always the case.

In additon to the typical mast mount, I've seen radomes mounted on poles of various lengths--- stainless, aluminum, fiberglass, PVC, and even wood--- attached to the flying bridge deck. An arrangment like this could easily be made foldable for a boathouse.
Very true...I asked at a Furuno Technician school I attended for several years and they said the same...you'd have to put your head in the Radome or keep ducking the open array for many moons before the radiation would affect you.
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Old 06-11-2012, 03:25 PM   #27
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With that being said i have a steel plate on the Port side of my head and 9 screws, So i think ill avoid any of the radar i can mounted mine 36 inches above the cabin roof, No flybridge to worry about.
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Old 06-11-2012, 04:44 PM   #28
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I believe Forespar makes a gimbaled radar mast. Not necessarily needed for trawlers (unless you're in some rolly beam seas), but it might be a solution.
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Old 06-26-2012, 10:57 AM   #29
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Dwyer Aluminum Mast Company allows you to design your mast and runs a couple hunderd buck unles you a disco light and speakers.

https://www.dwyermast.com/Default.asp
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Old 06-27-2012, 05:02 PM   #30
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Most people only use radar in really fowl weather ...
Ignoring the opportunity for a bird joke, I will point out that Rule 7 of the ColRegs says:
(b) Proper use shall be made of radar equipment if fitted and operational
This is generally interpretted to mean that, if you have an operational radar, it must be "in use".

I know this is a very anal thing to point out, but I think it's worth knowing "the rules" even if you decide not to follow them.
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Old 06-27-2012, 06:49 PM   #31
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Ignoring the opportunity for a bird joke, I will point out that Rule 7 of the ColRegs says:
(b) Proper use shall be made of radar equipment if fitted and operational
This is generally interpretted to mean that, if you have an operational radar, it must be "in use".

I know this is a very anal thing to point out, but I think it's worth knowing "the rules" even if you decide not to follow them.
Actually...the "must be in use" is a myth that a few people who went through captains courses keep alive in forums...

the rule is...

(a) Every vessel shall use all available means appropriate to the prevailing circumstances and conditions to determine if risk of collision exists. If there is any doubt such risk shall be deemed to exist.

(b) Proper use shall be made of radar equipment if fitted and operational, including long-range scanning to obtain early warning of risk of collision and radar plotting or equivalent systematic observation of detected objects.

(c) Assumptions shall not be made on the basis of scanty information, especially scanty radar information.

A clear blue day does not require RADAR and it's info while useful is NOT EVEN CLOSE t being needed to avoid a collision with a small craft so the use would be debateable at best.

You can argue either way till you are blue in the face...but unless you have a near miss or an actual collision...the authorities are not gonna come ticket you because you don't have your radar on and if you do have a collision...there's probably 100 other things in line before the radar being an issue because the chances are you are not "certified" or "qualified" to even use it. Now if you are...different story...
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Old 06-27-2012, 07:58 PM   #32
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Actually...the "must be in use" is a myth...

the rule is...
Maybe I'm particularly thick, but I don't see anything in the text you added - and highlighted - that contradicts my statement or supports your "myth" assertion.
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You can argue either way till you are blue in the face...but unless you have a near miss or an actual collision...the authorities are not gonna come ticket you because you don't have your radar on and if you do have a collision...there's probably 100 other things in line before the radar being an issue because the chances are you are not "certified" or "qualified" to even use it. Now if you are...different story...
Um, I wasn't referring to the risk of being cited. The only time this is likely to come up is in a courtroom, and if I landed there I would be thankful if I followed the "prudent mariner doctrine".
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Old 06-27-2012, 08:20 PM   #33
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Maybe I'm particularly thick, but I don't see anything in the text you added - and highlighted - that contradicts my statement or supports your "myth" assertion.

Um, I wasn't referring to the risk of being cited. The only time this is likely to come up is in a courtroom, and if I landed there I would be thankful if I followed the "prudent mariner doctrine".
It's been argued ad nauseum at the "USCG" "Professional mariner level" and the words " appropriate to the prevailing circumstances and conditions"
ring true...for the average recreational boater the use of radar in clear conditions can be as much as a distraction as a help...the average recreational boater really CAN'T use their radar effectively so it's a non-issue in the eyes of a maritime court...for the average rec boater...unless like I said you are "qualified" or "certified" in it's use....otherwise RADAR would be mandatory on ALL commercial vessel...which it isn't....and even radar certification isn't required.
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Old 06-27-2012, 10:55 PM   #34
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It's been argued ad nauseum at the "USCG" "Professional mariner level" and the words " appropriate to the prevailing circumstances and conditions" ring true...for the average recreational boater the use of radar in clear conditions can be as much as a distraction as a help...
I simply quoted the ColRegs - you're the one who interpretted "in use" to be a fulll-time radar operator. For the purposes of THIS thread, "in use" would start with "turned on" - i.e. emitting radiation - and maybe end there. Regardless, I'm sure you'll agree that running your radar when underway is generally considered a "good idea" - whether because it's warmed up, being continuously tested, being checked against visual references, increasing familiarization, whatever. That it is also required by the ColRegs is probably secondary - but it isn't a "myth".
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Old 06-28-2012, 06:58 AM   #35
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I simply quoted the ColRegs - you're the one who interpretted "in use" to be a fulll-time radar operator. For the purposes of THIS thread, "in use" would start with "turned on" - i.e. emitting radiation - and maybe end there. Regardless, I'm sure you'll agree that running your radar when underway is generally considered a "good idea" - whether because it's warmed up, being continuously tested, being checked against visual references, increasing familiarization, whatever. That it is also required by the ColRegs is probably secondary - but it isn't a "myth".
Sure using the Radar is a "good idea"...the colregs wording is such that not using it all the time makes you look like you are "unprofessional" or negligent which is almost good enough reason TO have it on all the time....

I only pointed out the "myth" that the rules require a radar if so fitted be in use at all times...otherwise why use the words "appropriate to the prevailing circumstances and conditions"????

For the OP...I would definitely prefer folding masts to telescoping masts and stay away from aluminum pieces that work...like hinges and pins....make it stainless if it will work a lot.
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Old 07-01-2012, 02:24 AM   #36
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The Colreg nterpretation psneeld properly refers to as a myth lies in the interpretation of the word "appropriate." Appropriate means just that--- something that makes sense under the circumstances. The relevant definition of "appropriate" in the dictionary on this computer is:

------------------------------

adjective |əˈprōprē-it|
suitable or proper in the circumstances : a measure appropriate to a wartime economy.

-----------------------------------

So in terms of the wording of the Colregs, the use of radar is determined by how appropriate it is to be using it under the specific conditions one finds oneself in. This is NOT the same as saying "if you have it you have to use it." Under Condition X (heavy fog) it may be appropriate to be using the radar to prevent a collision, but this does not mean that it is just as appropriate to be using it under Condition Y (clear with 15 mile visibility).

So if the skipper or captain determines that using the radar is not appropriate to the prevailing conditions, he or she is not at odds with the Colregs by leaving the radar off.

BUT...... if the radar is off and the vessel is involved in a collision or other accident/incident that MIGHT have been prevented had the radar been on, the skipper/captain/crew of the vessel could be determined to be totally or partially responsible for the event.

As with most things to do with boating, using the radar is an individual's judgement call. Judge wrong and you could have a problem. But there is nothing in writing that dictates exactly when you have to have the radar on because the water and weather environment is virtually infinite in what it can present to a boat's crew. So you could never define all the conditions under which radar MUST be used, even if you wanted to. So they leave it to the Person In Charge on the vessel to determine if the use of radar is "appropriate" under the prevailing conditions or not.
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