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Old 05-18-2014, 01:12 PM   #81
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The same for the flying bridge. Its more than a helm station. We have two large settees up there plus room for chaise lounges... We even have a sink and a referidgerator on the flying bridge. The area represents approx 13X25' or 325 square feet of living space. This is living space your boat doesn't have either.
Good point !! So many people see the flybridge as just a steering station. In reality it's one of the more roomy and pleasant entertainment areas on the boat, with seating for six and a refer for Corona!!
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Old 05-18-2014, 01:43 PM   #82
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Good point !! So many people see the flybridge as just a steering station. In reality it's one of the more roomy and pleasant entertainment areas on the boat, with seating for six and a refer for Corona!!
True, True, True!!

For cruising there is comfortable permanent seating for 5 in affixed cushioned chairs - 3 facing forward and 2 facing rear. Deck space for two portable chairs can make that = 7. When at anchor there is often one to three on bridge during day. Port and stbd permanently fastened full track fold-downs act as recliners or flats making it nice for reading or snoozing. Storage lockers under fold-downs offer plentiful space as is the same for cabinet doors to either side of center helm. When canvassed at dock, coolers, cushions, small HD inflatable boat with oars, BBQ equipment, and swimming toys are stored under.

For 4th O' July fireworks, Christmas parades, and other events it becomes standing room only to get best views from the bridge.

Yup! - - > Flying bridge surely is not only for piloting - but - many assorted fun things too!
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Old 05-18-2014, 02:36 PM   #83
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As I see it the trade offs in boat and trawler design often center around how much the boat is a vacation home on the water vs how much emphasis is on it being just a functional boat. There is good reason why buyers and builders opt for the space and luxury thus the big boxy boat. The classical primary helm station is commonly caught up in this compromise situation along with things like side decks cockpits and low free-board. The FB aside from the primary station has its + attributes and negative all a balance in choice. My point being with some design thought a primary helm need not be augmented by the FB just for the sake of visibility. I do not think this statement would hold water when applied to sport-fishing boats or working tugs,but could work with many pleasure trawlers(whatever trawler implies) and express types. There are many of these types with very nice primary helm stations and some that really cry for a FB. There are many boat with good upper and lower helms and some with both lacking its all in the trade offs.
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Old 05-18-2014, 03:05 PM   #84
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I was coming back from a 2 night trip south of Savannah this morning on the icw and i noticed several northbound boats with nice bridges that were operating from the lower helm. I didnt understand why until i took a down wind turn. Horseflies. By the thousands. Bitting right thru my tee shirt.
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Old 05-18-2014, 03:18 PM   #85
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How's this for rear visibility from below?
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Old 05-18-2014, 04:00 PM   #86
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Like I said in the OP, I just knew I was going to hate myself for stirring up this pot.
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Old 05-18-2014, 06:59 PM   #87
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Barpilot what you get is different opinions and preferences. One of my joys cursing or walking a dock is seeing the many different approaches taken to deal with traveling on the water. If you have a good reason to have a FB or your boat came with one enjoy it if you can. If you are considering an add on or new to you boat just weigh the pros and cons as they affect your time on the water. There is no free lunch here a FB costs in terms of $ complexity and potential negative function, so it has to do something you want if you purposefully put it there. my present boat was designed and built one off I had to go through this process and decide if I end up with a FB. 30 years ago I probably would have given more weight to a FB,my needs and my interface with the water has changed over time.
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Old 05-18-2014, 07:23 PM   #88
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Still giving us the oldies, aren't you Al?
Nope...that's how she looks today.


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How's this for rear visibility from below?
Looks great!

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Like I said in the OP, I just knew I was going to hate myself for stirring up this pot.
Good discussion of various perspectives, IMO. (no pun intended) Thanks, Barpilot!
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Old 05-18-2014, 08:03 PM   #89
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Like I said in the OP, I just knew I was going to hate myself for stirring up this pot.
Nothing stirred up. Just individual preferences and reasoning. Help you figure out your own preferences.
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Old 05-18-2014, 08:27 PM   #90
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Funny thread; I showed it to Ann.
"So you are arguing both with the lower helm only crowd and the flying bridge only crowd?"
Answer: "Yes! Because in the ideal world, they are both wrong!"
"Well isn't that a little too obvious?"

One thing that I note about the lower helm only crowd: the focus seems to be more on boating as a means to get from Point A to Point B, rather than on enjoying and observing the surroundings on the water and the out of doors. As I said, we are all on the water for different reasons.

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Horseflies. By the thousands. Bitting right thru my tee shirt.
OMG, the May flies in Georgia! Like something out of a Stephen King novel. Yes, we were very thankful for our lower helm the one year we experienced that. They are only out for about a week, but dayammn!

Mark, your wife being all bundled up was the giveaway. Still missing 70% of the view. I spent the first half of my life messing around out there on sail boats and skiffs and ski boats. Always thought it kind of boring in and of itself. Then later in life came back and did it all on Fb equipped boats... whole 'nother world, on the rivers and Delta. If you ever get out the Gate and do ocean cruising, then much, much less of an issue for sure; needle definitely swings in favor of lower CG and helm.
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Old 05-18-2014, 09:30 PM   #91
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How's this for rear visibility from below?
Don... that truly is beautiful... Just think of how additionally awesome it would look with perefectly clear view from an the elevation of a Flying Bridge!

Sorry, couldn't help myself.
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Old 05-18-2014, 10:02 PM   #92
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Don... that truly is beautiful... Just think of how additionally awesome it would look with perefectly clear view from an the elevation of a Flying Bridge!

Sorry, couldn't help myself.
Just saw my dermatologist Friday. He froze 3 more places off. Yeah, I've had fly bridges and tuna towers, and I am paying the price. I also like to be on the same level as my anglers. Been there----done that. You really can have a breeze and enjoy the water from a more protected station. With the auto pilot on I can even stroll out to the cockpit. Oh yeah, no oxygen deprivation from altitude.
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Old 05-18-2014, 10:15 PM   #93
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Just saw my dermatologist Friday. He froze 3 more places off. Yeah, I've had fly bridges and tuna towers, and I am paying the price. I also like to be on the same level as my anglers. Been there----done that. You really can have a breeze and enjoy the water from a more protected station. With the auto pilot on I can even stroll out to the cockpit. Oh yeah, no oxygen deprivation from altitude.
We just wish you the best. Certainly a part of boating that scares us. We even have tops for our RIB's. We love the sun but we stay sheltered when we can.
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Old 05-18-2014, 10:24 PM   #94
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We just wish you the best. Certainly a part of boating that scares us. We even have tops for our RIB's. We love the sun but we stay sheltered when we can.
Thanks. Here is a shot of our RIB with the 4 grandkids.
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Old 05-18-2014, 10:40 PM   #95
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Just saw my dermatologist Friday. He froze 3 more places off. Yeah, I've had fly bridges and tuna towers, and I am paying the price. I also like to be on the same level as my anglers. Been there----done that. You really can have a breeze and enjoy the water from a more protected station. With the auto pilot on I can even stroll out to the cockpit. Oh yeah, no oxygen deprivation from altitude.
That's so true for so many of us. I've only had one basal cell carcinoma removed from my nose, but that's enough. (My wife says it helped my appearance!) I'm a slow learner though because I didn't use enough sunscreen last week and now I'm paying the price with peeling ears and shoulders. I need to be more careful.

I enjoy the FB in the shade of the bimini for short runs, but the salon has all the comforts of home, a great view and I feel more connected to the boat's systems with ears, nose, ER cameras and 2 fridges.
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Old 05-18-2014, 10:41 PM   #96
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How's this for rear visibility from below?
Don... that truly is beautiful, looks GREAT from your salon!

Just think of how awesome it would look from the clear range of our elevated sight Flying Bridge!

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Old 05-18-2014, 11:36 PM   #97
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Nope...that's how she looks today.




Looks great!



Good discussion of various perspectives, IMO. (no pun intended) Thanks, Barpilot!
There must be lots of psychology majors on this forum. Sailing has always been pretty uncomplicated. I never had any idea that getting into trawlering was going to be so complicated. With sailing, it's pretty much me, the boat and the weather. I may be getting in over my head. I had no less than three people tell me this weekend that handling a twin screw was just like driving a tractor or bobcat. Ah, that would assume that I have ever had or even wanted to drive a tractor or bobcat......................
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Old 05-18-2014, 11:39 PM   #98
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There must be lots of psychology majors on this forum. Sailing has always been pretty uncomplicated. I never had any idea that getting into trawlering was going to be so complicated. With sailing, it's pretty much me, the boat and the weather. I may be getting in over my head. I had no less than three people tell me this weekend that handling a twin screw was just driving a tractor or bobcat. Ah, that would assume that I have ever had or even wanted to drive a tractor or bobcat......................
Well, driving a twin is really like pushing a grocery cart.
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Old 05-18-2014, 11:45 PM   #99
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There must be lots of psychology majors on this forum. Sailing has always been pretty uncomplicated. I never had any idea that getting into trawlering was going to be so complicated. With sailing, it's pretty much me, the boat and the weather. I may be getting in over my head. I had no less than three people tell me this weekend that handling a twin screw was just driving a tractor or bobcat. Ah, that would assume that I have ever had or even wanted to drive a tractor or bobcat......................
Wifey B: Have you ever held a cat? Maybe that counts instead of driving a bobcat. Driving a trawler a lot simpler than sailing. Just new to you. Really the only thing different is the propulsion.

You think lower helm is complicated question. Omg, the arguments you sail people go through on mono vs. cat. And then you have all these different kinds of sails and stuff. I don't even know the names. And you tack and go this way and that. Too much freaking work for me. Oh and I can handle twin screw but never driven a tractor or bobcat or forklift or....lawnmower....I do like the videos though of the drunk guy going down the street riding his lawnmower and getting a DUI.

And sailing you're far more at the mercy of the weather. Important anyway but bail out harder for you dudes. I mean you're off shore and it kicks up. Let's say 30 miles off. Fast boat hits land fast in an hour. Semi in 2 hours, typical trawler in 3. Sail it may be 5 and it may be 10 if the wind is wrong.

We sail only when someone else doing it all and we just ride along and smile and enjoy. Well, we did have 8 foot styrofoam sailboats we'd play with on the lake.
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Old 05-19-2014, 12:21 AM   #100
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When I looked for a boat, I wanted to keep it simple. At the time, for me, it meant a seaworthy boat, a pilothouse, and good visibility.










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