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Old 03-30-2014, 10:11 PM   #21
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And some captain's can and do both....for the right reasons ....but both ways aren't always possible or desired.

But one camp shouldn't say the other is right or wrong...safe or unsafe....
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Old 03-31-2014, 06:47 AM   #22
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Tidal information is available.

True , but in many tidal areas with inlets every few miles it would take a super computer to plan on knowing when and where the tide is favorable or sucks.

Easier to keep on putting , and enjoy the day.
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Old 03-31-2014, 07:57 AM   #23
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Tidal information is available.

True , but in many tidal areas with inlets every few miles it would take a super computer to plan on knowing when and where the tide is favorable or sucks.

Easier to keep on putting , and enjoy the day.
True....but there's a few places...but relly only if you are going less than say 8 knots...you start at 8 and go up from there...the currents are a much lower percentage of your worries. If you are a 5-6 knot boat....then yes you better get in the mindset of whatever they bring...but a few areas you can easily plan against the really bad foul currents.

Notrhbound up the Waccamaw River (Georgetown to Myrtle Beach) or Cape Fear River (Southport to Snows Cut below Wilmington, NC) you don't want to fight an outbound spring tide and regular river current if you can help it.

Also just south of Charleston in Elliot Cut and the Stono River....a strong current and back flow against you can start or finish a day on a really slow bell when you lose 2-4 knots for a large chunk of the day.
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Old 03-31-2014, 08:38 AM   #24
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...... in many tidal areas with inlets every few miles it would take a super computer to plan on knowing when and where the tide is favorable or sucks..............
That is correct. A trip from Charleston to Beaufort, SC will have the tidal current reversing seven or eight times. North is no different. Looking at a chart will make this pretty obvious.

I usually keep a constant 2,000 RPM which gives me about seven knots over water. Over land I will see (on my chart plotter) anywhere from below five knots to above nine knots. And this change can occur in just a couple minutes.

I'm not delivering boats, passengers or cargo, I'm cruising for pleasure. I start when I want to and I stop when I want to (keeping in mind the limits of where I can and cannot stop).
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Old 03-31-2014, 09:14 AM   #25
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I find that for the most parts tides cancel out. If you are being pushed toward an inlet, when you pass it you will be running into the current. Like PSneeld said there are some long stretches like the Waccamaw and Cape Fear that it would be better in a slow boat to play the tides. Elliot Cut can be wild when a lot of traffic is running through there.

In a slow boat what you do need to watch carefully are the side setting currents near any inlet to the ocean. They can sneak up on you.
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Old 03-31-2014, 02:57 PM   #26
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I find that for the most parts tides cancel out. If you are being pushed toward an inlet, when you pass it you will be running into the current. .............
You would think so and they probably do over a season, but I can look back and see where it took me X hours to get from home to someplace and X+2 or X-2 to get back or to get there or back the next time.

I understand that some people's experiences may be different from mine but that doesn't mean what I experienced did not happen.
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Old 03-31-2014, 03:51 PM   #27
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Maybe I'm missing something...but I'm familiars with captains that plan a destination for the night and call it a schedule...not necessarily down to the hour.

I'm rarely an hour or maybe 2 (at tops) late or early on a planned 8 hr day in a 6 knot boat.

So being held back by current, stopped by a bridge or two or whatever....there has been only 2.5 days I've ever missed a movement day/departure time to get to a planned stop because of weather

One was because of gale force winds blowing down Albemarle so I laid over in Coinjock.

Another lost half day was because the alligator river bridge wouldn't open because of 40 knots gusts and tornado watch....plus backing 200 feet in a narrow channel with a new to me single with no thruster delayed me almost as much as the bridge...but had I been on a different dock...I wouldn't have lost that day.

The third I was pinned to Hazzard Marines face dock in Georgetown due to a norther blowing 25G35 and they crammed me between 2 other boats with just feet to spare. Again had I been at Harborwalk Marina...never would have lost that day. From now on, weather won't hold me up in those 2 places and hasn't this year as I'll be watching what tomorrow morning wx does for my departure strategy.

I would say 2.5 weather days in dozens of trips between Florida and Jersey over 15 years ain't bad....maybe it's planning...maybe it's luck...mabe it's skill enough to mitigate whatever the weather might be.

No other manmade delay has really slowed me down. Maintenance is a different story...especially on some deliveries...none so far in my boat in nearly 6 thousand miles.

Even so I still plan a weather/maintenance day in every 10. If the day isn't used I shorten a couple days or just add in an additional, fun stop.

Since leaving FT Pierce, Fl...I've already had a couple small changes...mainly due to changed interest...but like last night...a rare 3 day weather window of nearly perfect weather came up while in Oriental.....so now instead of sticking to the ICW...we are going to head out to Hatteras tomorrow morning and follow that with a stop in Manteo. So changes in a 45 day return trip home can still be made if you plan in a couple days here and there or add/subtract some time here and there...if you want to.
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Old 03-31-2014, 05:20 PM   #28
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Always encountering tidal currents of 1.5 to 2.5 knots, flooding or ebbing, here. ... Riding a flood lasts longer than an ebb here. ... Tide tables are only theoretical estimates and not to be unquestioned.
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Old 03-31-2014, 05:40 PM   #29
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The point I was attempting to make in post #15 is; I'm planning a trip. From my home marina I can make it to point "A" or point "B" depending on what time we leave the marina and currents and wind and possibly passing situations where I will be stuck behind a slower moving boat until it's safe to pass. Point "A" and point "B" are perhaps two and one half hours apart with no good anchorage in between.

Not knowing where I will be starting from on day two means I can't reliably say where I'll end up that day. We may again be in an area where stopping points are two or three hours apart. Not knowing where I'll be starting from on day three means I can't say where we will end up that day and so on

I realize I could run a tighter schedule and push on even when I'm tired but that's not why we cruise. Other folks may not have that luxury or just be to "organized" to operate this way.
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Old 03-31-2014, 07:30 PM   #30
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Lots of diffident way to enjoy the water, as these posts point out.

OP, when you go, run your own race, your own way, go when you are comfortable and above all enjoy!

Late last year l departed Chesapeake bay and headed south, not having been south of NORVA with a big boat ever, it was a true adventure and I found it to not be that difficult. Made it safely to JAX, with nary an issue........

The guys and girls on the forum were a big help along with the Active Captain app.

Enjoy!

Hope to see you out there!
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