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Old 08-09-2014, 06:37 PM   #1
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Here's and interesting DIY.Lithium Ion battery bank.

Shall we discuss this interesting story of a DIY conversion to lithium ion battery bank in a Defever 44.I have a lot of success with flodded lead acid batteries and AGM from years of operating,managing,or owning equipment with those set ups.I confess that I am not as up to date on lithium ion technology as I should be.I just expect my $0.39,yes 39 cent,Verizon phone to work on demand.

Panbo: The Marine Electronics Hub: The DIY lithium battery bank; Bob Ebaugh has 330 cycles so far
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Old 08-10-2014, 09:47 PM   #2
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Check with your insurance company, before you waste too much time researching them.

My insurance company came out with a letter/article with a recommendation that they not be used by recreational boaters. So I would be reluctant to install them if it might jeopardize my coverage. I might be able to find the article again if you're interested in reading it.
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Old 08-11-2014, 12:01 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Edelweiss View Post
Check with your insurance company, before you waste too much time researching them.

My insurance company came out with a letter/article with a recommendation that they not be used by recreational boaters. So I would be reluctant to install them if it might jeopardize my coverage. I might be able to find the article again if you're interested in reading it.

I don't have the talent for what that guy did.I just thought is was an interesting read and may eventually be the future battery solution.Way to expensive for my pocket book.I'll stick with flooded lead acid and AGM.
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Old 08-11-2014, 12:47 AM   #4
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There is another battery technology that is purportedly being developed in Japan that isn't Lithium based, which is supposed to be the next step up in battery technology. I forget what it's called, but reportedly doesn't have the issues with thermal runaway and a finicky battery charger system and temperamental cell charging behavior.

What the letter said was basically the lack of standardization of the different lithium technologies, along with required maintenance and other problems and danger outweighed the advantages.

Here is their conclusion:

The Future Of Li-ion Batteries
Li-ion batteries have a bit in common with propane tanks: They're a high-energy storage system that is potentially dangerous. Fortunately, with propane, we (usually) manage to avoid disaster. But propane systems have a complete set of American Boat and Yacht Council (ABYC) safety standards that govern their installation and use. While the ABYC is closely following developments, Li-ion batteries are an evolving technology, one that the aircraft and auto industries still haven't perfected. Until the market narrows down to one or two chemistries and reliable, robust battery management systems, it's all but impossible to develop standards for the safe installation and use of Li-ion batteries on boats.

While Li-ion batteries may just revolutionize heavy-duty energy storage someday, the costs and risks still outweigh the benefits for most recreational boats. Until more data exist on which type of Li-ion batteries work best for boats, and what unexpected issues may arise, Seaworthy recommends that most boaters steer clear of these compact, high-energy batteries. For the few boats where the benefits of Li-ion batteries might outweigh the expense and the risks, such as offshore racing sailboats and tournament bass boats, we recommend that the systems be professionally installed and professionally maintained.
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Old 08-11-2014, 09:57 AM   #5
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The best battery technology is now owned by Standard Oil, Chevron. It's Ah nickel-metal hydride batteries, NIMH, which were invented for the EV1. They have the capability to last a quarter million miles of use or better in that car. GM sold the patent soon after crushing the EV1's and the Honda's and Toyota's that had those batteries were recalled by Chevron to get the batteries. They didn't want anyone to have them.
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Old 08-23-2014, 11:44 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Edelweiss View Post
There is another battery technology that is purportedly being developed in Japan that isn't Lithium based, which is supposed to be the next step up in battery technology. I forget what it's called, but reportedly doesn't have the issues with thermal runaway and a finicky battery charger system and temperamental cell charging behavior.

What the letter said was basically the lack of standardization of the different lithium technologies, along with required maintenance and other problems and danger outweighed the advantages.

Here is their conclusion:

The Future Of Li-ion Batteries
Li-ion batteries have a bit in common with propane tanks: They're a high-energy storage system that is potentially dangerous. Fortunately, with propane, we (usually) manage to avoid disaster. But propane systems have a complete set of American Boat and Yacht Council (ABYC) safety standards that govern their installation and use. While the ABYC is closely following developments, Li-ion batteries are an evolving technology, one that the aircraft and auto industries still haven't perfected. Until the market narrows down to one or two chemistries and reliable, robust battery management systems, it's all but impossible to develop standards for the safe installation and use of Li-ion batteries on boats.

While Li-ion batteries may just revolutionize heavy-duty energy storage someday, the costs and risks still outweigh the benefits for most recreational boats. Until more data exist on which type of Li-ion batteries work best for boats, and what unexpected issues may arise, Seaworthy recommends that most boaters steer clear of these compact, high-energy batteries. For the few boats where the benefits of Li-ion batteries might outweigh the expense and the risks, such as offshore racing sailboats and tournament bass boats, we recommend that the systems be professionally installed and professionally maintained.

I think this new technology is from the company:

http://osimicronpowerpak.com

It looks interesting but I cannot find very much information on this power pack.
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Old 08-23-2014, 12:58 PM   #7
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Lithium chemistry comes in many forms. The high energy cells are different than LiFePO4 cells. For a house bank LiFePO4 cells are both safer than all others including lead acid, and when cycle life is figured in, they are cheaper too. To fully utilize this cycle life (2000+ cycles), you should be a full time cruiser.

I use these cells for electric propulsion and heavy inverter loads. Almost nil Peukert effect, minimal voltage sag under heavy loads, excellent charge acceptance, plus I have over 400 cycles and they still have over stated capacity.

Capthead is correct about nickel-metal hydride batteries, they really increased the range of the EV-1. Big Oil did swoop in and bought the rights to these cells above 10 ahr. That means you can still buy D cells, but nothing larger.
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Old 08-23-2014, 01:57 PM   #8
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This battery looks intriguing. We gave one away at our Cruising Outpost PNW Cruisers Party last weekend in Anacortes. I didn't get much time to check it out, but those that did really wanted to win it in the raffle ($425 value). And I'm not kidding, the damn thing weighed about as much as an 8D!

Firefly Oasis Battery - Carbon Foam AGM
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