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Old 10-07-2012, 07:34 PM   #21
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Guessing that is called Gauntlet Inlet on the charts
Unfortunately for us pleasure boaters, its the norm around here. For the lobstermen, in spite of recent low prices per pound for their catch, its a goldfield.
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Old 10-07-2012, 07:36 PM   #22
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Thanks for the replies everyone.

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Old 10-07-2012, 07:41 PM   #23
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Around here if you shine a light into the pilothouse of a commecial vessel be prepared for a sever blasting on the VHF.
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Old 10-07-2012, 07:48 PM   #24
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Headlights

I can tell you with certainty that running with any lights other than nav lights on more than intermittantly will get you stopped and a citation from one of the many law enforcement agencies on the water - CG, Marine Police, Sheriffs, police depts, and game wardens. VA regulations say very clearly that any light other than standard nav lights must be used intermittantly (up to officer to determine what that means) and never shined at an oncoming vessel.

I love boating at night. Visibility is a problem only on the darkest of nights a few days a month or when overcast and we avoid unfamiliar waters then. Had an electrical failure one moonless night and came home at idle speeds from a restaurant about 25 miles away on sight alone. That wasn't fun but we made it safely after several hours running. Amazing how such an experience builds confidence. We don't hesitate to go out at night.

Gary Looking for a live-aboard trawler
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Old 10-07-2012, 08:35 PM   #25
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Wondering ... since night has serious visibility limitations, might not one want to sound his fog horn?
Night isn't reduced (restricted) visibility.....by NAVRULE definition....the maneuvering signals are "in sight" or "in restricted visibility"

here's the NAVRULE definition... The term "restricted visibility" means any condition in which visibility is restricted by fog, mist, falling snow, heavy rainstorms, sandstorms or any other similar causes.
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Old 10-07-2012, 08:36 PM   #26
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Around here if you shine a light into the pilothouse of a commecial vessel be prepared for a sever blasting on the VHF.
Steve W

Or a blast back by a searchlight that will REALLY annoy you...
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Old 10-07-2012, 08:54 PM   #27
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Yeesh. Always interesting to see why hard and fast rules that work in one place won't work in another.

Hope that bay is productive. That's some serious stock depletion otherwise.

I try not to use forward facing floods (destroying night vision, embarrassing other vessels, and all that), but last year I killed a sonar dome with a log, so what do I know?
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Old 10-07-2012, 09:01 PM   #28
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I can tell you with certainty that running with any lights other than nav lights on more than intermittantly will get you stopped and a citation from one of the many law enforcement agencies on the water - CG, Marine Police, Sheriffs, police depts, and game wardens.
In my area, boaters run at night with "headlights" on on a regular basis and I don't see them being stopped by LEOs.

Many deck boats come from the factory with headlights (they are probably labelled "docking lights").

My marina is on a river and it's also a dry stack operation with lots of these boats. Sitting on the dock after dark I can see them for a mile or more driving home with their headlights on.

Personally, I seldom operate in the dark, but when I do, I do not have or use headlights.

BTW: As tempting as it is to shine a light directly into the eyes of a captain who has just done that to you, the result will be that neither of you can see where you are going and he might hit you.
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Old 10-07-2012, 09:07 PM   #29
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Does weird things to the highest power light at a low angle to the water
HOLLYWOOD[/QUOTE]

Interesting . How so.

I love the whole mysteries of the sea thing.

Even simple things like judgment of distance.
Looks like a hundred yards and it's more like 1/2 a mile.
Or the way sound carries.

So what is wierd. Cause and effect Please.

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Old 10-07-2012, 09:31 PM   #30
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I have a lot of lights on my boat. The winters are long and dark Here in Alaska. If it wasn't for lights I could never go anywhere in the winter.
Not enough daylight hours to get anywhere.
I am always anchoring in the dark At 4:30pm

Thankfully I am In Prince William sound in an Ice free harbor and port.
I seem to be one of the few people to take advantage of this.

Never had a complaint about the lights.

Most people say "I gotta get me some of those."

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Old 10-07-2012, 11:08 PM   #31
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I can tell you with certainty that running with any lights other than nav lights on more than intermittantly will get you stopped and a citation from one of the many law enforcement agencies on the water
You are mistaken, as long as those lights aren't mistaken for navigational/running lights. The usual deck and interior-but-visible lights are allowed.
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Old 10-07-2012, 11:10 PM   #32
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Night isn't reduced (restricted) visibility.....by NAVRULE definition....the maneuvering signals are "in sight" or "in restricted visibility"

here's the NAVRULE definition... The term "restricted visibility" means any condition in which visibility is restricted by fog, mist, falling snow, heavy rainstorms, sandstorms or any other similar causes.
No rule prohibits showing navigational lights or making signals regardless of visibility.
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Old 10-08-2012, 12:41 AM   #33
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Does weird things to the highest power light at a low angle to the water
HOLLYWOOD
Interesting . How so.

I love the whole mysteries of the sea thing.

Even simple things like judgment of distance.
Looks like a hundred yards and it's more like 1/2 a mile.
Or the way sound carries.

So what is wierd. Cause and effect Please.

well, light is reflected off water at the same angle that it approaches the water, if you wish to illuminate a large area of water to see objects in the water the light needs to be at a as close to a 90 angle to the surface as possible, a low angle will reflect the light straight ahead ( this is why on a flat day you can see the mirror effect of mountains on the water) the low angle works well to illuminate docks,pilings. it is physics... and I cannot remember ( or care to for that matter) exactly why the water molecule does this.
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Old 10-08-2012, 12:52 AM   #34
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Originally Posted by VAtrawlerguy View Post
I can tell you with certainty that running with any lights other than nav lights on more than intermittantly will get you stopped and a citation from one of the many law enforcement agencies on the water - CG, Marine Police, Sheriffs, police depts, and game wardens. VA regulations say very clearly that any light other than standard nav lights must be used intermittantly (up to officer to determine what that means) and never shined at an oncoming vessel.

I love boating at night. Visibility is a problem only on the darkest of nights a few days a month or when overcast and we avoid unfamiliar waters then. Had an electrical failure one moonless night and came home at idle speeds from a restaurant about 25 miles away on sight alone. That wasn't fun but we made it safely after several hours running. Amazing how such an experience builds confidence. We don't hesitate to go out at night.

Gary Looking for a live-aboard trawler
boy can you imagine what kind of ticket they would write this guy!

As long as you have the correct navigation lights showing " additional" lighting should not get you in trouble.. nav lights are there to be able to determine the direction the other vessel is traveling relative to your vessel
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Old 10-08-2012, 01:18 AM   #35
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The most important thing is to be seen.

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Old 10-08-2012, 07:36 AM   #36
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No rule prohibits showing navigational lights or making signals regardless of visibility.
true...but "night" alone does not meet the definition of restricted visibility....

I wasn't clear in your question then... "Wondering ... since night has serious visibility limitations, might not one want to sound his fog horn?
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Old 10-08-2012, 08:04 AM   #37
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I have a remote spot light like most do, however I've found a hand held spot light used from the bridge to be much more useful. You gotta open the eisenglass though.
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Old 10-08-2012, 10:03 AM   #38
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Isinglass. Makes the beer clear I wonder if it makes the light clear.

SD
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Old 10-08-2012, 10:52 AM   #39
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I have a hard time considering night-running to be recreational.
I love night runs, especially offshore when it's relatively flat. Good vis from coastal lights from the houses, condos, etc, should be to one side. Good sighting on other boaters IF they have their nav light on. I say "if" because we came up on a sailboat anchored as I recall, that was totally black. We used the spot/flood to illuminate her up as we approached and passed. Crazy.

Generally though, your eyes adjust to the lighting conditions and you can easily see the bouys and markers, especially in chanels and harbors that you're familiar with.

Oh, and the stars are something else.
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