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Old 05-13-2016, 04:10 PM   #21
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I use a domestic CO monitor. It beeps when batts get low, and once about 5yr old it kept beeping with good batts, apparently sensor pooped. So I replaced it.

I can't see a big difference between marine and domestic. Houses have furnaces, stoves, cars in garages, barbeques, etc... Lots of potential sources. Risk similar to that of boats.

Diesels don't make much CO, but do make some. They can make a good bit if overloaded and making black smoke, but that is rare for marine gennies. If you see black smoke, back off the load.

On my ride, even in the summer if I run the AC hard for a couple hours before bed, I can shut it down and boat stays comfortable til sunrise. I have run it all night, but not often. Inverter runs the fridge overnight.

I've been the engr on a boat gennie CO fatality investigation. That was sobering. Gasoline gennie, mixture set too rich and it made LOTS of CO. Came in under sliding glass door. Engine room blower left on drew a slight vacuum on whole boat interior.
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Old 05-13-2016, 04:34 PM   #22
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Where does the notion that home detectors are "lesser" sensors than marine ones?

Anyone have side by side tech data to verify that?

Other than power source....differences?

I don't think I've ever seen a statement about the residential sensors not being "good enough" to detect CO. I have read -- but this is only third-, fourth-, or fifth-hand info at best -- that certain household sensors might be more prone to false alarms in a mobile (RV or marine) environment.

Note "certain" and "might" -- with no more definitive info usually available in those kinds of statements.

Even if true, don't know if that would condemn all residential units... and anyway I'd guess it's likely that some protection is better than none, so folks can buy whatever suits their budget.

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Old 05-13-2016, 04:47 PM   #23
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Just installed a diesel heater. Was told we shouldent be without a CO detector. We already had 2, salon and stateroom, just precautionary. Curious if there is a greater CO risk from a heater (different combustion parameters?) than a diesel engine thus increasing potential risk of toxicity?
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Old 05-13-2016, 05:02 PM   #24
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I disbelieve there is any difference in terms of safety...

Usually requirements are the same and guts are the same.

I will continue to use and recommend household ones until proven to me otherwise as the respond to well below the threshold of remote danger.

My experience with marine ones from a years back was they were very unreliable from false alarms to no alarm at all. The new ones might be better....but I have no reason to change my mind or recommendation....but certainly will with the tiniest shred of proof that certain ones are better than others.
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Old 05-13-2016, 05:04 PM   #25
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I'm curious as to how you think the exhaust from the Gen would get into the boat if you have the A/C on?

Why are you not concerned about the engine exhaust?

Also, do you think you would not smell the exhaust?

Actually, bigger risk of engine exhaust getting in, but then, that involves physics, which is usually absent on most of these conversations.
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Old 05-13-2016, 05:29 PM   #26
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The marine versions should have some conformal coating on the innards to mitigate corrosion, that and the ability to hook up directly to a DC source instead of relying on also-corrosion-prone AA cells would be the advantages.
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Old 05-13-2016, 07:15 PM   #27
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We sometimes take one statement and turn it into another. Here, we're stating that we're not aware of a boater dying from a diesel generator. However, we also stated that the exhaust was not harmful. That part is not true. It's just that the harm would probably be very slow in coming and combine with other exposures during your life.
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Old 05-13-2016, 07:20 PM   #28
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I want to mention that generators aside, any boat with a propane galley stove definitely needs CO detectors because unvented gas stoves give off quite a bit of CO. Last year when our oven was accidentally left on during a cold day with Windows all closed, the CO detector went off due to the buildup under those circumstances.

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Old 05-13-2016, 08:15 PM   #29
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One other little tidbit to be aware of.

I was once told that once you get CO into your blood stream it does not leave you after a period. You get to keep it. So multiple exposures over time can cause some real issues. Not sure of the validity of that.

Here is a clearly written article.

CO Health Risks - Detect Carbon Monoxide
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Old 05-13-2016, 08:20 PM   #30
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Diesel exhaust has a lower percentage of CO than a gasoline engine exhaust. Diesels ingest much more air per unit of diesel burned than gasoline engines. Spent many years in the underground mining business where diesels proliferate and what would run us out of a heading first was heat rather than a CO buildup. Never seen a gas engine used UG.

But, if any concerns inside your vessel get a Drager air quality tester. They are simple and foolproof.

Several deaths with gas generators at Lake Powell over the years. Tragically people like to swim beneath the houseboat pontoons with the gensets on. Another died from barbecue exhaust fumes trapped beneath/between the hulls.
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Old 05-13-2016, 08:33 PM   #31
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The salt air in a beach house is just as corrosive as the air in my cabins miles from the beach.

Unless you are a pasaagemaker......I really don't think which kind you buy matters a bit.

If you own a beach house and are using battery powered CO and smoke detectors...maybe you should be buying boat ones instead.
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Old 05-13-2016, 08:54 PM   #32
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The marine versions should have some conformal coating on the innards to mitigate corrosion, that and the ability to hook up directly to a DC source instead of relying on also-corrosion-prone AA cells would be the advantages.
There's a UL specification for marine CO detectors. UL 1524.
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Old 05-14-2016, 10:50 PM   #33
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Where does the notion that home detectors are "lesser" sensors than marine ones?

Anyone have side by side tech data to verify that?

Other than power source....differences?
The high quality detectors, particularly those designed for marine and aircraft, use a detection algorithm that takes into consideration the cumulative effect of CO. In the body, inhaled CO binds to hemoglobin in the blood. Hemoglobin has a high affinity for Oxygen, but it has a higher affinity for CO. So the longer CO is inhaled or present (even at very low levels) in the air one breathes, the more it interferes with the hemoglobin's ability absorb oxygen, to the extent that eventually the oxygen is completely displaced by CO. You effectively suffocate. This is what makes CO so insidious.

Because CO poisoning is cumulative, a detector must mimic the accumulation in the bloodstream. Exposure to even very low CO levels for an extended time will eventually accumulate enough CO in the bloodstream to cause poisoning. Most residential detectors are linear, and are, in fact pretty much useless because they don't monitor very low levels that can accumulate over a long period of time. By the time they alarm, you're already compromised. If you're going to install one, get a good one. First Alert and most of the residential units don't pass muster. The cumulative low level monitoring is the key to choosing an effective monitor.

Aeromedix is designed for use in aircraft, one of the best. Nighthawk by Kidde does cumulative low level monitoring, and several marine units also do. Choose wisely. If it's important enough to install a monitor, it's worth getting one that's top of the line.
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Old 05-14-2016, 11:04 PM   #34
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I don't disagree that one might be better than another...

But I am waiting for someone to post where a specific marine CO detector is substantially better than a home one...

I am waiting......beyond personal opinion....
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Old 05-14-2016, 11:08 PM   #35
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I don't disagree that one might be better than another...

But I am waiting for someone to post where a specific marine CO detector is substantially better than a home one...

I am waiting......beyond personal opinion....
I don't think anyone has suggested that using a home unit is bad. Some have suggested a preference for a unit designed for the marine environment. So I doubt anyone will post what you are asking for.
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Old 05-15-2016, 01:18 AM   #36
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I don't disagree that one might be better than another...

But I am waiting for someone to post where a specific marine CO detector is substantially better than a home one...

I am waiting......beyond personal opinion....
Well, the reason I've read to select a marine unit vs a home unit is that the home unit may go off frequently from fumes from even another boat at the marina. They are calibrated to different standards.

From Boat US:

CO and Fume Detectors On a Boat - BoatUS

Marine units do work off of time based algorithms too.

Another article saying the same thing as boat us, from Sailing Magazine.

Can I use any carbon monoxide detector?

Now, if yours isn't going off excessively perhaps ok. I'm not even going to try to convince you. However, I will continue to use marine units.
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Old 05-15-2016, 07:16 AM   #37
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"any boat with a propane galley stove definitely needs CO detectors because unvented gas stoves give off quite a bit of CO."

Interesting tho that hotels , hospitals and big retail stores use propane floor polishing equipment , in a country overloaded with Liars for Hire !
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Old 05-15-2016, 07:32 AM   #38
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"any boat with a propane galley stove definitely needs CO detectors because unvented gas stoves give off quite a bit of CO."

Interesting tho that hotels , hospitals and big retail stores use propane floor polishing equipment , in a country overloaded with Liars for Hire !
Yes but... air handling systems in those applications are constantly changing the air and adding fresh outside air.
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Old 05-15-2016, 08:07 AM   #39
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Any detector is better than nothing. Several years ago we lost a service manager and his son. They were working on a hunting cabin and were using a small gas heater the one night when the temperature dropped. They didn't make it.
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Old 05-15-2016, 12:39 PM   #40
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I don't disagree that one might be better than another...

But I am waiting for someone to post where a specific marine CO detector is substantially better than a home one...

I am waiting......beyond personal opinion....
I think Maerin just did.
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