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Old 12-22-2011, 11:41 AM   #1
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Galley Switch

I'm renovating my all-electric galley and have replaced a Princess stove/oven unit with a combined microwave/convection oven (1000W) and a separate induction cooktop (1250W). The Princess (with one power source) had a selector switch to use either the cooktop or the oven but not both at the same time. I would like to set up the new galley the same way so that a handy switch would allow either the microwave/convection oven or the induction cooktop to be used, but not at the same time. What would be the best kind of switch for this application?

*

Thanks,

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Old 12-22-2011, 11:45 AM   #2
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Galley Switch

It all depends on where in the circuit you want to install the switch. Is it going to be on the unit itself and void your warranty?

You really need to have someone with electrical skills look at the schematic and advize you.

Ah, just reread and saw where they are entirely independent units. In that case a properly rated DPDT switch will do the job nicely.

*


-- Edited by RickB on Thursday 22nd of December 2011 12:53:16 PM
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Old 12-22-2011, 11:51 AM   #3
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RE: Galley Switch

Why not use the one that is on the old unit?
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Old 12-22-2011, 11:56 AM   #4
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Galley Switch

I have installed a 20A duplex receptacle but separated the two plugs so the cooktop will go to one plug and the microwave to the other. I would like to wire it so that the switch feeds either one or the other plug and the switch is handy to the galley location (i.e., not have to go over to the e-panel).

(The old unit was sold.)


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-- Edited by dvd on Thursday 22nd of December 2011 12:57:23 PM
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Old 12-22-2011, 12:55 PM   #5
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RE: Galley Switch

Quote:
dvd wrote:I have installed a 20A duplex receptacle but separated the two plugs so the cooktop will go to one plug and the microwave to the other.*
Supply the power to those plugs through a properly rated DPDT switch. In one position it supplies one outlet, in the other it supplies the other.

*

Or, if you are just shopping for answers, use a Krytron or a pulse neutron tube.
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Old 12-22-2011, 01:19 PM   #6
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RE: Galley Switch

Thanks, just picked up a 20A DPDT at Graingers -- they were out of pulse neutron tubes.

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Old 12-27-2011, 01:56 PM   #7
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RE: Galley Switch

A single pole, double throw switch will be fine. You don't have to switch the neutral.
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Old 12-27-2011, 03:54 PM   #8
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RE: Galley Switch

Quote:
rwidman wrote:
*You don't have to switch the neutral.
Good marine electrical practice demands switching both conductors. It is a safety issue for AC circuits and is the only way to assure isolation of a load.

If one is going to play marine electrician, one should take a professional approach.
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Old 12-27-2011, 04:49 PM   #9
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Galley Switch

Quote:
RickB wrote:rwidman wrote:
*You don't have to switch the neutral.
Good marine electrical practice demands switching both conductors. It is a safety issue for AC circuits and is the only way to assure isolation of a load.

Not really.* Look inside your electrical panel.* All the branch circuits use single pole breakers.* They switch the hot wire only.

*


-- Edited by rwidman on Tuesday 27th of December 2011 05:50:54 PM
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Old 12-27-2011, 04:58 PM   #10
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RE: Galley Switch

Look between your deck layers, it is probably rotting plywood. Just because recreational boat builders do certain things doesn't mean they are doing it right or even using best practices.

Marine AC switches should break both conductors. In this case where the installer has the option to do it cheap or do it safely and adhere to best practice, I suggest best practice in favor of saving a foot of wire and $2. This particularly applies to a galley fixture.

I guess we have different standards.
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Old 12-29-2011, 01:07 PM   #11
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Galley Switch

I read the entire thread twice and will have to side with Rick on this one.

Best practice vs It will work fine.

You can always do what will work but sometimes there is a better way. Especially when working with something that could be hazardous as in a galley where a fire could occure.

SD

*

*


-- Edited by skipperdude on Thursday 29th of December 2011 02:29:38 PM
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Old 12-29-2011, 02:29 PM   #12
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Galley Switch

All very entertaining, but while the keyboards clacked away I installed my 20A DPDT switch and it's working great!

Thanks,
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-- Edited by dvd on Thursday 29th of December 2011 03:32:06 PM
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Old 12-29-2011, 06:18 PM   #13
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RE: Galley Switch

Quote:
skipperdude wrote:
I read the entire thread twice and will have to side with Rick on this one.

Best practice vs It will work fine.

You can always do what will work but sometimes there is a better way. Especially when working with something that could be hazardous as in a galley where a fire could occure.

SD

*-- Edited by skipperdude on Thursday 29th of December 2011 02:29:38 PM

"Best practice"?* Switch it the way everything else on a boat is switched.**Switch the hot wire.* There is absolutely no reason to switch both wires.* If there was, it would be an ABYC requirement.

You can switch both wires, you can even switch the bonding conductor but why?* All you will accomplish is to make things more difficult and confuse anyopne who ever works on your electrical system in the future.

Being in the galley makes absolutely no difference.* Take that stove or microwave apart and you will find that the manufacturer only switches the hot wire.

This is electricity 101.
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Old 12-29-2011, 06:26 PM   #14
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Galley Switch

*
Quote:
dvd wrote:
All very entertaining, but while the keyboards clacked away I installed my 20A DPDT switch and it's working great!

Thanks,
dvd



-- Edited by dvd on Thursday 29th of December 2011 03:32:06 PM
*

Well that's just GREAT! And to think I was just pulling up a chair with a full bowl of popcorn! I guess the show is over. Now we can all go about our own business. (whistling innocently...)


-- Edited by FlyWright on Thursday 29th of December 2011 07:27:17 PM
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Old 12-30-2011, 04:09 AM   #15
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RE: Galley Switch

"I would like to set up the new galley the same way so that a handy switch would allow either the microwave/convection oven or the induction cook top to be used, but not at the same time. What would be the best kind of switch for this application?"

Of course a fellow interested in conserving his energy might select a load shedding switch , so one item could be on , but would be automatically shut off when the second item is selected.

Graingers , about $60, for the automatic everything folks.
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Old 12-30-2011, 06:00 AM   #16
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RE: Galley Switch

Quote:
FF wrote:


Of course a fellow interested in conserving his energy might select a load shedding switch , so one item could be on , but would be automatically shut off when the second item is selected.


*Ummm. Isn't that what an On-On DPDT switch does? (for $11)
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Old 12-30-2011, 06:06 AM   #17
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Galley Switch

First, unless there's an electrical problem or limitation that won't allow the oven and cooktop to be used at the same time, all this switching will accomplish is to make it more difficult to cook meals. I (and my wife) often use the burners and microwave or oven at the same time when preparing a meal.

Second, as I previously posted, there's absolutely no need to switch the neutral if a switch to select one appliance or the other is desired.* A simple SPST switch will do the job as long as it's rated for the current.

Third, I'll make a guess that this "automatic load shedding switch" only switches the hot conductor. It also confuses the cook and makes the boat more complicated and prone to trouble.

Let's remember the "KISS" principle here: Keep It Simple, Stupid.



-- Edited by rwidman on Friday 30th of December 2011 07:07:28 AM


-- Edited by rwidman on Friday 30th of December 2011 07:08:43 AM
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Old 12-30-2011, 06:11 AM   #18
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RE: Galley Switch

Quote:
RickB wrote:
Good marine electrical practice demands switching both conductors. It is a safety issue for AC circuits and is the only way to assure isolation of a load.

Not so. You can assure "isolation of a load" by unplugging it.
*
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Old 12-30-2011, 10:20 AM   #19
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RE: Galley Switch

Quote:
rwidman wrote:
*
.* All the branch circuits use single pole breakers.* They switch the hot wire only.

*

What is ment by branch circuits.

I thought he was setting things up with a seperate circuit for the application? He seems to indicate not wanting to have to go to the electrical pannel to change circuits.

Would there be any difference if he was running things off an inverter or the shore power?

SD
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Old 12-30-2011, 10:56 AM   #20
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RE: Galley Switch

Quote:
skipperdude wrote:rwidman wrote:
*
.* All the branch circuits use single pole breakers.* They switch the hot wire only.

*

What is ment by branch circuits.

I thought he was setting things up with a seperate circuit for the application? He seems to indicate not wanting to have to go to the electrical pannel to change circuits.

Would there be any difference if he was running things off an inverter or the shore power?

SD

Just like in your home, on a boat there is a circuit supplying power to the main circuit breaker (or fuse in the "old days") panel.* The circuits leaving that panel are "branch circuits".* They are each protected by a circuit breaker (or fuse) that opens the "hot" conductor if there is a short circuit or overload.

If you have a circuit from the main panel that supplies power to a sub panel, the circuits leaving the sub panel would also be considered "branch circuits".

The same terminology would apply to DC circuits.

An inverter (or genset) is no different, it is merely a self contained power source.

And just so there's no misunderstanding. there can be more than one circuit supplying power to the main circuit breaker panel (shore power, genset, or inverer), but only one can be used at a given time.

*
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