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Old 04-16-2012, 01:02 AM   #21
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How would the cost of trucking a boat between the OP's two locations compare to the cost of running the boat up on its own hull? In 1998 when we bought our GB the cost to truck the boat from Alameda, CA to Puget Sound was about $4,000, the same as it would have cost to hire a delivery crew. So we trucked it which was much faster (3 days) and made our insurance company a lot happier.

One thing in our favor was that because of the type of trailer used the flying bridge did not have to be removed from the boat. A larger model GB would have required the flying bridge to be removed and then replaced at the destination, something that would have added a great deal more cost to the trucking option.
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Old 04-16-2012, 06:48 AM   #22
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With luck on the weather a month should do IF youn run delivery style.

However there are lots of places like St Augustine or Charlston that deserve a day or two.

With some noodeling all the bridge , lock restrictions are posted on line , so a plan will get you much further each day.

Our planning consists of finding suitable anchorages at say , 50 , 60 and even 75 miles apart a few days in advance.

The Marina to marina cruisers have it easier (if the boat is not outsized) as there are loads of buck a foot to $4.00 a foot places to overnight.

From ACY to NYC along the N Jersey shore is the only place along shore , in the actual ocean is required for most.

With good weather the jump from Norfolk to ACY or even NYC can easily be done.

You should have enough hours on the boat to begin to trust it by then.

Good cruising , but do STOP along the way , its more fun.

Do the delivery yourself if you value the boat , most "delivery crews " are beyond brutal.

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Old 04-16-2012, 07:09 AM   #23
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Salty Bear...home port will be at the Beacon Harbour out of St. Catharines. I'm hoping we will find a trawler and have her home around July or Aug. We liked the layout of the Albins and Marine Trader. We stumbled upon an Albin palm beach a couple of days ago. Any thoughts on the Palm?
Be wary of those Taiwan boats fron the 80's if they lived in tropical waters their whole life and stayed in the water year round.

My Albin had pretty bad hydrolysis issues and I'm in the process of grinding off the bottom and relaminating. I'm good with glasswork but a marina might charge $15-$30,000 to do it right (plus the boats ut of the water a couple months to over a year depending how they do it. Don't even talk to people about blisters....if that's what they are talking about first...before they use the word hydrolysis...I'm gonna speculate that they have read some...but not enough on the subject. You ALWAYS have hydrolysis going on...whether you have blisters or not depends.

Don't think that a surveyor will catch much more than the obvious blisters because without extended drying or coring ...a moisture meter isn't very accurate. The more reading I do...the more coring the hull is the only way to find out for sure how bad the damage can be and even then...I have good spots and spots 6 laminations of roving deep that were bad.

Yes..I'm sure some...maybe even many delivery captains can be tough on a boat...but some are better than owners because they care for it better long the way, they can head off major issues before the owner might recognize them...they can fix/jury rig systems so the trip can be completed without expensive on the road repairs...etc...etc.. It just takes a bit to find the right one.

FF is sorta correct about the NJ ICW...it's a PIA for time and boats drawing 4 feet or more. It can be done at high tide most of the way without any more concern than the rest of the ICW. If you do it because you want to or need to for weather...call your assistance tower in the area and get very specific instructions for their stretch of the NJ ICW. I have notated many a cruisers chart for bad areas along most of the NJ ICW over a beer in their saloon.
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Old 04-16-2012, 08:49 AM   #24
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Another option is to make the trip, or segments of it, yourself but make a priceless learning experience out of it by hireing a captain to do an "assisted voyage" with training. If you are new to this type of boating this might work better for your insurance company, as well.
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Old 04-16-2012, 10:07 AM   #25
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What a wonderful opportunity for a lifetime cruise and to get to know your boat in the relative comfort and safety of the ICW! I get excited just thinking about it.

Seeing as how you're presumably new to trawlering, I'd suggest the GICW to Ft Myers, across the Okeechobee Waterway, then up the AICW. If you're comfortable enough then for an offshore jaunt, run outside to NYC, then up the Hudson to Albany and over to Oswego. I've covered all those miles and it can be a relaxing trip with proper planning. There's a lot to learn about locks, bridges, anchoring etc. but that's 1/2 the fun.

No one has mentioned the inland route...not sure if it's still open?

Like others have noted - a good rule of thumb is to plan about 75 miles per day and be prepared to cut it short or go longer. The only time we tie up to anything is to buy fuel, get stores, pumpout or lock thru - we never stay at Marinas.

Check out:
https://activecaptain.com/X.php
for valuable firsthand information.

Oh, and get yourself an unlimited towing policy before you head out.
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Old 04-17-2012, 05:42 AM   #26
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"FF is sorta correct about the NJ ICW...it's a PIA for time and boats drawing 4 feet or more. It can be done at high tide most of the way without any more concern than the rest of the ICW."


That is if you can accomodate the large number of low bridges inside NJ that DO NOT OPEN!

We ran LUCY ( 50 loa) inside NJ after ACY , but under 4 ft draft and 10ft 6 inch air draft allowed the trip.

PLAN AHEAD!!!

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Old 04-17-2012, 06:31 AM   #27
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Quote:
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"FF is sorta correct about the NJ ICW...it's a PIA for time and boats drawing 4 feet or more. It can be done at high tide most of the way without any more concern than the rest of the ICW."


That is if you can accomodate the large number of low bridges inside NJ that DO NOT OPEN!

We ran LUCY ( 50 loa) inside NJ after ACY , but under 4 ft draft and 10ft 6 inch air draft allowed the trip.

PLAN AHEAD!!!

FF
The only problem bridge for the average small to medium powerboat/trawler without a tuna tower/tall mast is the Longport bridge at 25 feet..I'm not sure if they reopened the NJICW back to the original path (behind that bridge)...it shows on the ud to date charts as open...but that's one section I haven't run in about 8 years. The rest of the bridges that don't open (4 of them) are 35 feet.

Good advice about planning ahead for any trip...too many boaters rely on old knowledge and get trapped by construction/dredging, shoaling, lack of fuel, etc..etc...
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Old 04-20-2012, 09:37 PM   #28
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I have done the trip and that is way too long of a trip to have a schedule. How about a wait of 6 days at Barnegat Light, NJ for weather and another 6 days at Oswego, NY for weather and how many other times waiting just one day for weather or whatever.
The most dangerious thing to have on a boat is a schedule. Period.
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Old 04-20-2012, 10:14 PM   #29
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My canadian trucker charged me $2.00 / per mile for my last boat ... but that was back in 1997... I thought I heard $3.00 / mile lately ... anyway - the cheapest way to get a boat from point A to B is usually to truck it.

I would persue that unless you want to enjoy a sweet slow poke
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