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Old 12-13-2015, 03:11 PM   #21
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............... I personally prefer the dielectric grease alternative to solder, ....
Dielectric grease is not an alternative to solder. "Dielectric", by definition DOES NOT conduct electricity. It's purpose on electrical connections is to exclude air and moisture. When used on plugs and sockets, etc., the action of inserting the plug scrapes the dielectric grease off the mating conductors while leaving enough to protect the connection.

If you want to smear dielectric grease on the terminal after crimping, that's fine but heat shrink tubing is better. Both is best and you can buy terminals with dielectric filled heat shrink tubing attached.
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Old 12-13-2015, 03:25 PM   #22
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The requirement is to have BOTH a mechanical and an electrical connection.
Isnt the C.G. requirement that no connection can be of solder alone? Crimping by itself is ok.
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Old 12-13-2015, 03:25 PM   #23
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You can't "run a bit of solder over" a connection and expect it to accomplish anything. You either heat the cable and the connector to the point where solder flows freely into the joint or your technique does nothing at all. More than likely, doing this will melt the insulation and solder wicking up the wire will make it stiff and subject to metal fatigue.

A properly crimped connection will be tight enough that there is no place for solder to flow.
Sorry totally disagree. I have over the years seen many crimped joints fail due to electrolytic reaction. I always crimp my connections using a proper crimp tool and then apply solder using flux. If soldering is done correctly the solder should not wick past the end of the terminal leaving the cable flexible. I am not overly concerned if the plastic on the crimp melts.
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Old 12-13-2015, 04:54 PM   #24
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You can't "run a bit of solder over" a connection and expect it to accomplish anything. You either heat the cable and the connector to the point where solder flows freely into the joint or your technique does nothing at all. More than likely, doing this will melt the insulation and solder wicking up the wire will make it stiff and subject to metal fatigue.

A properly crimped connection will be tight enough that there is no place for solder to flow.

+1.
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Old 12-13-2015, 05:05 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by WesK View Post
Dielectric grease is not an alternative to solder. "Dielectric", by definition DOES NOT conduct electricity. It's purpose on electrical connections is to exclude air and moisture. When used on plugs and sockets, etc., the action of inserting the plug scrapes the dielectric grease off the mating conductors while leaving enough to protect the connection.

If you want to smear dielectric grease on the terminal after crimping, that's fine but heat shrink tubing is better. Both is best and you can buy terminals with dielectric filled heat shrink tubing attached.
Probably a good thing I usually just crimp then! With heat shrink afterwards. Only occasionally do I get the urge to use grease, from now on it might be even less!
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Old 12-13-2015, 05:13 PM   #26
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WesK: you are on the money! Soldering may "help" crappy crimps, the moral of the story is don't make crappy crimps.
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Old 12-14-2015, 06:58 AM   #27
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"Soldering may "help" crappy crimps, the moral of the story is don't make crappy crimps."

The hassle is folks attempt to do marine electrical with auto terminal ends and auto crimp tools.

The Anchor brand wire , terminal end and crimping tool ( $ 80. or so) is OK , even for USCG inspected boats.

The usual hassle with soldering is folks do not have the proper heating tools.

A home soldering iron or gun has not enough heat to work.

It will heat the terminal end , but takes so long some of the wire is also melting and getting stiff.

My solution is to put flux on the wire , before inserting it in the terminal end.

Then a 3 -5 lb copper roofing iron is heated with a propane torch . Flea market item.

Just a touch of the heavy hot iron will do the job , flow the solder with out harming that nice multi-strand wire you bought.

Heat shrink tape is always an added plus.
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